Education

Paige Sutherland / NHPR

A statement issued this week by the leader of Phillips Exeter Academy in defense of two deans contradicts a New Hampshire State Police report from 2016. The report alleges two deans had violated a mandatory sex abuse reporting law.

Rockingham County Attorney’s office decided against criminal charges, with deans Melissa Mischke and Arthur Cosgrove now remaining on campus.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with attorney Peter Hutchins about the dropped charges, and sexual harassment reporting at high schools.

Mike Ross, UNH

Local chapters of the ACLU and the NAACP are asking the University of New Hampshire to emphasize issues of racial diversity and equity in the search for the university’s next president.

In an open letter to the presidential search committee, Devon Chaffee of the New Hampshire ACLU and Rogers Johnson of the Seacoast NAACP say the hiring of a new UNH president is the single greatest way to redirect the university.

They are urging the committee to use that opportunity to hire someone who will “foster a more socially conscious and inclusive campus.”

evmaiden via Flickr Creative Commons

A bill that would allow New Hampshire parents to use state funding to send their children to private schools faces a key vote Tuesday.

The House Education Committee will vote on the controversial bill that’s been the subject of debate among lawmakers and school reform advocates.

Jason Moon for NHPR

A key legislative vote on a controversial school choice bill was postponed today.

For weeks, Republican lawmakers have been working to revamp a sweeping school choice bill that was first proposed last year in the State House.

The bill would allow some families to take their children out of public school and then spend tax dollars that would have gone to that public school on other educational purposes.

jimmywayne / Flickr Creative Commons

A University of New Hampshire alumnus has pledged more than $2 million of his estate to students at the College of Engineering and Physical Sciences, ensuring that several students will receive free tuition every year.

The scholarship from Bob Winot will be awarded to New Hampshire or Vermont students who demonstrate financial need and have a grade point average of 3.0 or higher. It's estimated to benefit as many as four students a year.

Jason Moon for NHPR

A controversial school choice bill faces an important vote before lawmakers tomorrow.

The bill would create a type of school voucher system in the state, where parents could take their children out of their local public school and then spend the tax dollars that would have gone to that public school on other educational purposes, like private school tuition or home school supplies.

The proposal was hotly debated last legislative session and ultimately tabled by lawmakers.

Jason Moon for NHPR

The Manchester School District is planning to dramatically redesign the student experience at one of its high schools.

The details are yet to be worked out, but key concepts of West High's makeover include breaking up the normal school schedule so that students can do more learning outside the classroom, like through internships with local businesses. The plan also calls for every student to receive a personalized learning plan that's tailored to his or her particular needs.

Bolgen Vargas is the Manchester Superintendent of Schools.

evmaiden via Flickr Creative Commons

Debate about a controversial school voucher bill is again heating up.

The bill would create a type of universal school voucher system in the state, where parents could take their children out of public school and then spend the tax dollars that would’ve gone to that public school on other educational purposes. Things like private school tuition or home school supplies.

Jason Moon for NHPR

Last night in Durham, parents, teachers, and students from the Oyster River School District met for a conversation about diversity and discrimination.

The event comes several weeks after allegations of racist bullying in the school district.

As NHPR’s Jason Moon reports, the event last night was a time for people to share their stories and to chart where to go from here.  

Parents, teachers, and school administrators will gather in Durham tonight for a forum on diversity.

The event is being organized by the Oyster River School District.  It's in response to a pair of alleged racist bullying incidents from early in September.

College Board

New national data on the price of college shows once again New Hampshire’s public universities have the highest sticker prices for in-state students anywhere in the country.

Standardized tests scores for New Hampshire students are down slightly from last year.

According to the results for the Smarter Balanced tests released today, there was a 3 percent drop in the number of students in grades 3 - 8 proficient in English Language Arts compared to last year. In math, there was 2 percent drop.

Meanwhile, New Hampshire 11th graders taking the SAT showed a slight improvement in math scores.

There is a growing debate in New Hampshire and nationally about the value of homework, and educators are responding. Merrimack School District implemented a new homework protocol at the beginning of this school year.

Teachers can still assign practice homework, but it will no longer count as a graded assignment. Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Mark McLaughlin, assistant superintendent for Merrimack, about the new protocol and what it means for teachers and students.


Ryan Johnson / Flickr CC

The New Hampshire Department of Education says it has received an overwhelming number of applications for a new robotics grant program.

The department says nearly 100 schools have applied for the newly created New Hampshire Robotics Fund, which gives schools a financial boost to launch robotics teams.

Shannon McCracken teaches science, technology, and art at Farmington High School. She says the grant would offer new opportunities for her students.

Millyard800 / Wikimedia Commons

The state's longest-serving governor and a philanthropic entrepreneur have been awarded the University of New Hampshire's most prestigious awards.

Democrat John Lynch, who graduated from UNH in 1974 and served as governor from 2005-2013, was awarded the Charles Holmes Pettee Medal in recognition of his devotion to service. Lynch currently serves as a professor at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College.

A student claims the private, Christian school he's attended since kindergarten has told him he's no longer welcome because of his gender identity.

Seacoast Media Group reports  that Stiles Zuschlag transferred to a Maine public high school for his senior year after he was told he was no longer welcome at New Hampshire's Tri-City Christian Academy. Zuschlag, a transgender teen, said he was told he should consider homeschooling or counseling.

Tri-City Christian Academy administrator Paul Edgar declined to speak about Zuschlag's case citing privacy issues.

New data is available from the federal Department of Education on the costs and performance of New Hampshire’s universities.

The new numbers are available on the College Scorecard, an online tool created by the federal government. It’s designed to let students easily compare stats like average annual costs and graduation rates from one school to another.

Clay Junell / Flickr Creative Commons

The University of New Hampshire is teaming up with a school district to provide fresh vegetables to students every week.

Beginning this month, the UNH Thompson School of Applied Science is supplying students in the Oyster River Cooperative School District with vegetables like tomatoes, cucumbers and lettuce. The vegetables are grown hydroponically in greenhouses.

NH Department of Education

Concord High School English teacher Heidi Crumrine was named New Hampshire Teacher of the Year on Tuesday.

The New Hampshire Department of Education says Crumrine was chosen for her dedication to teaching every type of learner. Now she’ll be the state’s candidate for National Teacher of the Year.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Crumrine on Wednesday.

The transcript has been edited lightly for clarity.

So what are you most passionate about when it comes to teaching?

 

Recent allegations of racist attacks or bullying among school-aged children have schools and communities doing some soul searching, along with establishing new policies and procedures.   

Grace Caudhill, the mother of a 7-year-old boy allegedly racially harassed on a school bus in the Oyster River School district told NHPR reporter Jason Moon that she has heard from the parents of biracial children in other parts of the state who describe similar experiences of "racial denigration and racial hate in school."  (Listen to the full story here.) 

A new report shows New Hampshire has made big strides in connecting public schools to broadband Internet. But there are some districts in the state who lack access.

biologycorner / Flickr Creative Commons

New Hampshire students will be introduced to new standardized tests this spring.

In recent years, New Hampshire has worked with a consortium of other states to create its standardized tests - what's known as the Smarter Balanced and the NECAP system.

Now, with the help of an assessment company, the state is crafting its own test, the New Hampshire Statewide Assessment System, or SAS.

Education Commissioner Frank Edelblut says the new system will be more tailored to New Hampshire and it will take significantly less time for students to complete.

Lee Haywood via Flickr Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/7iSnfi

Governor Sununu says requiring all school districts to start the school year after Labor Day would help bring the state's education system into the 21st century, and help the economy. 

“We talk about innovation in schools; we talk about 21st century – well,  I think it's time that we start looking at the calendar,” he said on The Exchange. 

Facebook - All Eyes on UNH

The University of New Hampshire has released an interim report on efforts to improve campus climate. The report comes from a task force created in the wake of a string of racially charged incidents that embroiled the Durham campus last school year.

Franklin Pierce University is offering free tuition, room, and board for the fall semester to up to 20 college students displaced by Hurricane Harvey.

Linda Quimby, vice president of enrollment at Franklin Pierce, says the move is meant, in part, to send a message to current students about moral leadership.

“We do think it sends a powerful message. And we also feel that it’s a way that Franklin Pierce can best reach out to individuals who may be impacted by the storm.”

Johannes Thiel via Flickr cc

High schoolers in the town of Northwood now have busses to take them to school again. But the town is still struggling to find drivers for elementary students.

NHPR Staff

A new audit of the state’s Community College system found dozens of areas in need of improvement.

The audit, from the state’s Legislative Budget Assistant, identified 29 different areas of concern, ranging from unclear delineation of powers to conflicts of interests to questionable spending.

Republican State Senator John Reagan requested the audit.

Jason Moon for NHPR

School districts across New Hampshire have been grappling with a shortage of school bus drivers.

Nowhere has that situation become more dire than in Northwood, where officials have been forced to delay the start of the school year and to push back the start of the school day by two hours.

That’s causing big problems for parents.

CREDIT MIKE ROSS, UNH

The University of New Hampshire says, thanks to a new program, more than 400 incoming freshman will attend the school tuition free. 

Under UNH’s new ‘Granite Guarantee’ program, any full-time, first year student, who lives in New Hampshire and qualifies for federal Pell grants, can attend the university without paying for tuition.

Victoria Dutcher, vice president for enrollment management at UNH, says the program is designed to encourage more in-state students to attend.

Jason Moon for NHPR

Civil rights groups are filing a formal right-to-know request with the Manchester school district.

Speaking from the steps of city hall, Manchester NAACP president Eric Jackson said the school district hasn’t been transparent enough about its efforts to address racial inequities.

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