Education

Alexandre Lemieux via Credit Flikr Creative Commons

With E-book sales outpacing print books, the days of the heavyweight backpack are numbered. In New Hampshire, thirty-three public schools banded together to purchase E-books instead of textbooks. Producer Sam Evans-Brown finds out why public schools are making the switch now, and why the long wait.

Read and Listen to Sam's story here.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/gadgetdude/804190044/">gadgetdude </a> / flickr

New data released today shows New Hampshire students graduating with the highest debt loads in the nation. 

According to a report from the Institute for College Access and Success, the Class of 2011 averaged $32,440 in debt.

It’s the second year in a row New Hampshire has had the highest average load. 

Tara Payne with the NH Higher Education Assistance Foundation says the numbers send a signal to students and parents.

If there is one thing that the mobile-computing era has made clear, it's that kids love touch screens. Because those touch screens — smartphones, iPads, Kindles and the like — are an inevitable added distraction to the classroom, schools across the country are struggling to deal with the growing prevalence of the technology.

But a growing number of schools are embracing these hand-held, Internet-ready devices by creating policies that put them to use in the classroom.

James Sarmiento / Flickr

We continue our “Issue of the Week” election series…and today we find out where the candidates for Congress, Governor, and President stand on.. education. Though all agree on the importance of strong schools and universities, candidates part ways on how to achieve this aim.  We’ll take a look at how they plan to tackle the many educational challenges, from student debt to funding state universities. 

GUESTS:

Danielle Curtis: Education reporter for the Telegraph of Nashua

Sam Evans-Brown: Education and environment reporter for NHPR

SanFranAnnie via Flickr Creative Commons

Tonight the country will get a chance to witness a quadrennial spectacle, the first of three presidential debates. There are many examples of debates that have shifted, even defined Presidential campaigns, sometimes, just because of a memorable turn of phrase.

The New Hampshire Board of Education recently announced a moratorium on aid to state-approved charter schools, a stunning development for their supporters. The state says there’s just no money there, raising questions about the future of this alternative source of public education in the Granite State. We'll look at what this may mean for the future of charter schools in New Hampshire.

Guests

Unicorns, Nessie, Big Foot...Oh My!

Sep 26, 2012
VeniceVandal via Flickr Creative Commons

A replica of Bigfoot, a display case dedicated to lake monsters, and the “mystery cat corner” are a few of the sights to see at Portland, Maine’s International Cryptozoology Museum. A little bit oddity, a little bit kitsch, it’s the type of place you might find by walking down a random alley... lucky for us, our adventurous producer Zach Nugent took that walk, and brings us this audio field trip.

The famous Patterson-Gimlin film:

Jonathan Lynch / NHPR

Concerned parents, teachers, and children held a rally in Manchester Saturday to protest the state of the Manchester school district. At least 200 people showed up to the rally at Veterans Memorial Park.

The event was organized by Citizens for Manchester Schools, a group formed in response to a budget shortfall that prompted the school district to lay off close to 150 teachers.

One of the group’s chief concerns is the burgeoning average class size in Manchester, with some classes reaching over 40 students.

Flikr Creative Commons / Herkie

A list of the top-ten most-read stories on nhpr.org and stateimpact.npr.org/new-hampshire.

New Hampshire is among many states seeking a waiver to the controversial federal education law, No Child Left Behind.  State officials recently submitted their plan to adopt new standards for students as well as teachers, while paying special attention to the lowest-performing schools. We’ll find out what’s being proposed, and what might be next.

Guests:

Civics for Citizenship

Aug 29, 2012
adam (THEO) via Flickr Creative Commons

One goal of our schools is to prepare young people to become informed and engaged citizens. Yet there is growing concern that students are not being prepared to participate in democracy, to learn from the historical actions of American government, or – critically - to understand the U.S. Constitution. We’ll take a look at efforts to address this here in New Hampshire.

Guests:

Matthew Paulson, via Flickr

This presentation was given at the Unitarian Universalist church in Peterborough, N.H. on August 5. The presentation will air on NHPR at 4 p.m. on Saturday.

From the Monadnock Summer Lyceum:

NH DOE

The New Hampshire Department of Education says that in the past decade there has been a 6 percent increase in the number of high school graduates continuing on to college, but also a five percent increase in the number of high schoolers leaving the state for college.

the_exploratorium via Flickr Creative Commons

Produced with Phoebe Axtman and Zach Nugent

Mounting research has shown that the most important factor in a child’s successful education is not his or her socioeconomic status, class size, or even the design of the curriculum…. it’s the teacher.  But teacher dropout rate is high and the highly talented teachers are too few, especially in Science and Math.

Tiggywinkle via Flickr Creative Commons

If you want to learn about the earth, you’re gonna have to get your hands dirty.   That’s the philosophy of environmental educator David Sobel: senior faculty member at Antioch University New England, and author of the book "Beyond Ecophobia".

Gage Skidmore via Flickr

In 1862, Congress passed the Morrill Act, which paved the way for our system of public higher education.  We’ll look at how America’s public and land-grant universities are faring today as they face budget cuts, aging resources, and, at times, criticism.

Guest:

Daniel Mark Fogel, professor of English at the University of Vermont, where he also served as president. He is co-editor of Precipice or Crossroads? Where America's Great Public Universities Stand and Where They are Going Midway through their Second Century.

courtesy Louis Broad, via UNH Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans and Space

Time to add another page in the history of space exploration in New Hampshire. This week a team of high school students taking part in the Project SMART summer program at UNH sent a small craft 105,700 feet into the air – that’s over 20 miles up. And it came back down to Earth without a parachute.

Brady Carlson, NHPR

It’s summer camp season – these days kids can spend a week on almost any activity they like, from sports and the outdoors to computers and robotics. Since the late 1960’s, kids who love music have been heading to Bennington, Vermont, which is home to a piano camp known as Summer Sonatina.

Flikr Creative Commons / Mike Willis

Governor John Lynch has vetoed a bill that would create a tax credit for businesses donating to not-for-profit scholarship organizations.

Most American troops have left Iraq, and many have left Afghanistan. Now more than half a million of them have left the service — and they're going to college. Some vets say the transition is like landing on another planet, but they aren't the only ones struggling: The college staffs are, too.

Flikr Creative Commons / Dean Terry

 

At the beginning of this school year, Spaulding High School in Rochester took a big step. They put in a new grading system, got rid of final exams, and reworked how they thought about giving grades in general. The change at Spaulding is part of a bigger change happening all over the Granite State.

kcadams via Flickr/Creative Commons

Recruitment from other countries is a rising trend in Higher Education as a way to diversify campuses and bring in money to financially strapped institutions.  It’s also become a big business, raising questions about the way in which students are brought in.  We take a look at this practice and how it’s evolving here in the Granite State.

Guests

Sara Plourde / NHPR

Enacting any constitutional amendment is tough. It requires a three-fifths vote by both House and Senate, and two-thirds support from voters at the polls.  Add to this the fact this amendment deals with school funding and that lawmakers have killed 80-odd  Claremont-inspired amendments over the past 14 years, and the guardedness of even the boldest of lawmakers is understandable.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/elizabeth_albert/4998473663/sizes/m/in/photostream/">Elizabeth Albert</a> / Flickr

Legislative leaders and the governor have reached a deal on language for an education funding constitutional amendment.

Ryan Lessard / NHPR

A group of parents in Manchester are calling for the state to provide more money for their school district.  The newly formed Citizens for Manchester Schools held a rally in downtown Manchester  Tuesday night. 

The organization’s president, Jim O’Connell says the city’s schools are underfunded. He says the money needed to fund an adequate education is relatively small.

As part of our year-long series on New Hampshire's Immigration Story, we've looked at what it's like for a refugee to arrive in New Hampshire, speaking a different language, and having to learn new customs.

For young refugees who enroll in New Hampshire schools, the challenges can be even greater - and the same goes for teachers working with them.

Sen. John Gallus, a Republican from Berlin, has joined only four North Country members of the House in supporting a bill that would give a business a tax credit when it donates to a parochial or private school.

As NHPR’s Dan Gorenstein reported the Senate Wednesday passed House Bill 1607.

Advocates of the bill say it gives less wealthy families more choices in where they wish to send their children.

As schools continue to mainstream children with disabilities, students with emotional and behavioral disabilities  may be the toughest to include.  They’re less likely to graduate and more likely to get arrested.  And there are questions about how to approach these kids – whether it’s a matter of more discipline or alternative methods.  We look at this issue and discuss a new documentary that takes a look at the topic through the life of a high school student coping with these disabilities.  

Guests:

Christiana Care / Flickr/Creative Commons

The long projected shortage of nurses in the state has been temporarily resolved in recent years. Hospitals that used to be beggars have become choosers, by seeking to hire more nurses with bachelor degrees or even master’s degrees. While many in the field are eager to adapt and pursue higher education, others fear academic achievement is being favored over years of experience.  We look at this development and the broad challenges facing the field of nursing.

Guests:

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