Environment

Word of Mouth
2:09 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

Decrease In Moose Population Has Scientists Puzzled

Credit Barbara via flickr Creative Commons

There are between 800,000 and 1.2 million moose in North America, but scientists are concerned that their numbers are shrinking – and fast. Moose populations from New Hampshire to Minnesota have been plummeting for years – as much as twenty-five percent each year in some cases – and while there are plenty of theories, nobody’s quite sure why.

Jim Robbins is a freelance writer and regular contributor to the New York Times. He wrote about the moose die-off for the Times’ environment section.

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Word of Mouth
12:48 pm
Wed October 23, 2013

Too Many Cars, Not Enough Drivers

Credit kardboard604 via flickr Creative Commons

The data on driving is that for nearly a decade, Americans are driving less – especially younger drivers. With an added drop in vehicle sales and issued driver licenses, some researchers and reporters suggest that the US may have passed “peak car” – and that America’s infatuation with driving may have hit its zenith in the 1990s.

Jordan Weissmann is a senior associate editor at The Atlantic, where he wrote about the concept of “peak car”.

Emily Badger, is a staff writer for The Atlantic Cities, she’s also covered the “peak car” phenomenon.

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Word of Mouth
11:42 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Mapping The Arsenic Seeping Into Our Diet

A screenshot of the U.S.G.S. map of arsenic concentrations in the U.S.

While many Americans struggle to trim sugar and fat from their diets, a far more dangerous ingredient may be seeping in…from the ground. Arsenic is an odorless, tasteless poison that exists in the earth’s crust. Last winter, the U.S. Geological Survey found that low levels of arsenic were present in forty percent of New Hampshire’s groundwater, for example,  with one in five wells measuring above ten parts-per-billion.

Independent researchers have also identified excessive levels of arsenic in water-intensive crops, including rice grown in the U.S. and abroad. Deborah Blum is a Pulitzer Prize-winning science journalist, columnist and blogger for Wired and The New York Times. She was given access to a U.S.G.S. map showing arsenic concentration across the U.S. ahead of its release to the public, and is joining us to share some of the findings. 

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NH News
3:31 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

N.H. Joins Lawsuit Aimed At Blocking Fishing Regulations

The Gulf Of Maine Cod is one of the species of fish affected by the federal groundfishing regulations.

New Hampshire is joining a lawsuit arguing that new federal rules will devastate New England's groundfishing industry.

Gov. Maggie Hassan and Attorney General Joseph Foster said Monday that New Hampshire has joined a lawsuit Massachusetts filed against fishing regulators in May seeking to block the rules.

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Word of Mouth
3:02 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

The Government Has Been Dropping Rabies Vaccines By Plane For Years

A couple weeks ago the Associated Press reported that the Department of Agriculture was dropping new vanilla-flavored rabies vaccines by airplane over New Hampshire forests as part of a five-state pilot study. Okay, if that sounds a little strange to you, get this: apparently the government has been distributing rabies vaccines by plane for over fifteen years. The story piqued the interest of NHPR environmental reporter Sam Evans-Brown, so he did some digging and is here to tell us more.

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NH News
8:31 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Virus May Be Responsible For Wild Turkey Deaths

Wild turkeys are a common sight in New Hampshire this time of year.
Credit pbedell via Flickr Creative Commons

New Hampshire Fish and Game biologists say wild turkeys in the Newington area may have been infected with a couple of viruses.

They've sent specimens from dead turkeys found last week to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Biologists tell the Portsmouth Herald the turkeys may be been infected with the avian pox virus or one referred to as LPDV.

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Environment
1:21 pm
Wed August 21, 2013

Statewide Project Looks At Ecosystems And Climate Change

UNH aqua-sensor technician Lisle Synder inspects an electrical cord at the Saddleback Mtn. site in Deerfield, N.H.
Ella Nilsen NHPR

A collaborative project between New Hampshire universities, the National Science Foundation, and state agencies is looking at ecosystem health and how the environment is affected by climate change.

At first glance, this part of Saddleback Mountain in Deerfield looks like a regular forest. But look closer and you see thick, black electrical cords running along the forest floor and silver instruments sitting among the trees.

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Word of Mouth
11:12 am
Mon August 5, 2013

Arctic Methane Belch Could Prove Costly

Credit NASA/Kathryn Hansen via NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's flickr

Methane is 25 times more potent a greenhouse gas than carbon – and scientists have discovered there is a potentially disastrous amount of methane trapped under relatively thin ice in the east Siberian arctic shelf. New research measures the global impact the gas could have on global warming… and it’s not very optimistic.  Fred Pearce is environmental consultant for New Scientist.

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Giving Matters
12:00 am
Sat August 3, 2013

Children Learn To Be Good Stewards Of The Great Bay

Great Bay Discovery Center in Greenland, N.H. April 8, 2013.
Cheryl Senter

The Great Bay Stewards work to preserve and protect the Great Bay estuary through education, land protection and research. Sharon Musselman, one of the educators, is recently a retired teacher who often brought her own classes here to explore this ecosystem.

"I'm excited to be here at Great Bay Discover center," Musselman said. "I brought my first grade class to Great Bay for 15 years because it is such a great experience for first graders."

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The Exchange
9:00 am
Wed July 31, 2013

Eradicating Invasive Species: Part 1 - Plants

Purple Loosestrife, Autumn Olive, Norway Maple and Multi-flora Rose may sound like plants you'd want in your garden, but actually, they're four of the 423 invasive plants currently in New Hampshire. These non-indigenous weeds, trees and shrubs, grow with a great ferocity strangling and starving the native species. Now some are fighting back against these green villains and making some progress as well. Today we begin a two part series on invasive species in New Hampshire, starting with weeds, trees and other non-native plants. 

Guests:

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Environment
10:04 am
Wed July 17, 2013

VIDEO: Oyster Farming With Fat Dog

Credit Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

On the dock of Great Bay Marine, there’s what looks like a little raft tied up, but get close and you hear the hum of a water pump. This is where Fat Dog Oyster Company is based.

Reporter Sam Evans-Brown recently spent a day with Jay Baker and Alex Boeri of Fat Dog for his story on the boom in oystering in N.H.'s Great Bay Estuary. You can check out more of his photos and sound in this 2-minute video:

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The Exchange
9:00 am
Mon July 15, 2013

Changing The Game On Climate Change

Credit PSNH

Last month, President Obama vowed to take on climate change, bypassing Congress and pledging to use his authority under existing laws. The centerpiece of his plan is imposing, for the first time, limits on carbon emissions from existing power plants.  Environmentalists applauded the announcement, but industry representatives balked, calling the approach heavy handed and warning of plant closures. We'll look at how this debate affects New Hampshire and the region.

Guests:

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EarthTalk
12:00 am
Sun June 30, 2013

Barack Obama's Climate Change Initiative

Credit iStockPhoto

EarthTalk®
E - The Environmental Magazine

Dear EarthTalk: What is the gist of President Obama’s new plan to tackle global warming and how does the green community feel about what the White House is proposing?  -- Bill Kemp, Seattle WA

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Word of Mouth
9:12 am
Wed May 29, 2013

New Zealand Cat Wars

New Zealand cat owners are reacting with outrage against a plan to drastically reduce the number of free-roaming cats proposed by renowned environmental activist Gareth Morgan.

The movement is rooted in a long-standing national concern about the dwindling native bird populations, including the kiwi, that are struggling against New Zealand’s cat population, which is the largest per-capita in the world. Here to discuss Kiwi’s cat war is ecologist Dr. James Russell, a senior lecturer at the University of Auckland.

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EarthTalk
12:00 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Nature Photography: Good Or Bad For The Environment?

Credit iStock Photo

EarthTalk®
E - The Environmental Magazine

Dear EarthTalk: Is nature photography good or bad for the environment? – Cal Moss, Camden, ME

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