Environmental Protection Agency

Water Contamination in N.H. Addressing PFOA

May 31, 2016
florianhuag / Flickr/CC

With new guidance from EPA on how much of the chemical is too much, and a lawsuit against the plastics plant that is its source, many Granite Staters are glad to see more action around the contamination. But others are still worried: both that the damage is already done, and that there's not enough assurance that it won't happen again.


EPA Superfund Records Collections

The federal Environmental Protection Agency has agreed to test water for possible PFC contamination near the Coakley landfill in southeast New Hampshire.

The Portsmouth Herald reports Gov. Maggie Hassan said it's her understanding that the EPA has committed to testing areas around the landfill in Rye and North Hampton and is finalizing a plan for such testing.

https://flic.kr/p/muU7qZ

The Obama Administration's top environmental regulator, EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy, was in New Hampshire today promoting the use of wood as a fuel. McCarthy took a tour of sawmill in Middleton that burns leftover wood scraps to generate electricity and to heat its facility.  

EPA Head To Highlight Biomass In New Hampshire Visit

Nov 16, 2015
Chesapeake Bay Program via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/UFV42

  The head of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is in New Hampshire today promoting biomass energy. 

Alan Levine via Flickr Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/yeux

Nationally, only 17% of students who enter community college seeking a bachelor’s degree reach that goal within six years. Today, we learn about a new program in Orlando, Florida that aims to solve the problem of community college attrition. Then, you’re locked in a dark cell with a group of strangers – there’s a zombie on the loose and you’re running out of time…oxygen…and solutions. It’s not a video game, this is real life…and you paid to be there. Welcome to the new trend in adventure recreation: the escape room.  

The public has a chance to learn about cleanup proposals at a former chemical plant in northern New Hampshire that was named a federal Superfund site in 2005.  The Chlor-Alkali site is along the east bank of the Androscoggin River in Berlin. The plant had supported the production of paper in local mills.  The Environmental Protection Agency says elemental mercury and other contaminants have migrated from the site and into the river, and continue to do so.

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

  A new EPA Clean Air standard for wood stoves is set to take effect next year.

It has been 25 years since the EPA wrote the first woodstove regulations. Since the rules were last refreshed, the health hazards from the unburned particles in wood smoke have been researched and quantified. But with the new rules now pending, manufacturers are saying that prices for new stoves will rise, and worry that will result in more people sticking with dirty old stoves.

Cheap, But Dirty

EPA Proposes Tighter Woodstove Emissions Standards

Jan 5, 2014
Woodstove 2006
Gord McKenna / Flickr Creative Commons

The EPA is proposing stricter emissions standards for wood stoves.  Manufacturers would have to build stoves that burn 80 percent cleaner than current models.  And for the first time, pellet stoves would be held to the same standards.  The EPA says pollution from these heaters is linked to asthma attacks, heart attacks, and stroke. 

Christian Patti / http://christianpatti.com/

The nine states that are members of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative have written the EPA to ask that RGGI be used as a model for forthcoming national regulations on emissions from existing power plants.

The EPA has already released rules on how much carbon dioxide new power plants are allowed to emit, But the rules that will crack down on existing plants are still in the works.

Simon Bowen

EarthTalk®
E - The Environmental Magazine

Dear EarthTalk: What are “ghost factories?”                                           -- Philip Walker, Hartford, CT

An Intervale firm is in trouble with the Environmental Protection Agency over allegations of water pollution in the North Country.

 NHPR’s Chris Jensen reports.

CSG Holdings – also known as Columbia Sand & Gravel - is accused of allowing polluted water to get into the Connecticut River.

“The nature of the discharge from the site contained large amounts of suspended solids basically.  Sand.  Silt.”

That’s David Deegan, an EPA spokesman.