first amendment

The U.S. Supreme Court Cases To Watch This Fall

Oct 23, 2017
John Marino; Flickr

A new term at the U.S. Supreme Court opens with some long-standing debates.  The high court began its legal season on October 1st. Major issues include the drawing of political boundaries, called gerrymandering. Other cases address issues of digital privacy and religious freedom. 

NPR has a comprehensive discussion of many of these cases, found here


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The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of a limited version of President Trump's travel ban this week, saving broader consideration for the fall.  We cover the legal arguments and look at other high-profile high court cases this term, including First Amendment issues on trademarks and hate speech. 


  The NH ACLU has weighed in on a lawsuit against the town of Farmington. In an amicus brief filed in federal court, the organization claims Farmington subjects its employees to a social media policy that violates those employee’s first amendment rights to free speech.

 

 

The lawsuit was initiated last year by former Farmington firefighter, Alexander Morin.  Farmington fired Morin in 2015, after Morin posted opinions on Facebook during off-duty hours.

 

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Hate incidents on college campuses have been on the rise recently, raising these questions among college and high school students alike: What's free speech?  And what's hate speech? What's dissent?  What's a threat?  

This show originally aired on November 29, 2016. 

New Angles in the Religious Liberty Debate

Jul 16, 2015
American Life League / Flickr CC

With the Supreme Court ruling making same-sex marriage the law of the land, opponents of that decision are looking to religious liberty as the next forum for debate. But the first amendment’s ‘free exercise of religion’ has much deeper roots, and broader implications than gay rights, from Muslim headscarves to contraception insurance coverage.

Photo Credit DenisDervisevic, Via Flickr Creative Commons

A sheriff’s office employee in Hampton Virginia alleges that in 2009 he was professionally de-friended after “liking” the Facebook page of his boss’s political opponent.  But in a wrongful termination suit that concluded earlier this year, a judge ruled the other way…saying that “merely ‘liking’ a Facebook is insufficient speech to merit constitutional protection.”  Ken Paulson is President and CEO of the F