Food

anotherlunch.com via Flickr CC

  While me may not remember classmates’ names, or the books we read, there’s something about school lunch that stays with us long after graduation. Today, Word of Mouth investigates the content of children’s brown bag lunches, and discovers they’re not always healthier than cafeteria fare.  Then: a growing number of young Americans are lowering their vocal registers. We’ll look at the speech pattern known as vocal fry, and find out why women who speak with a creak have worse job prospects than their higher-register peers.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.


Michael Samuels

Basil has been one of the big draws all summer at Dimond Hill Farm in Concord. 

“We give a sprig away for every customer who buys something,” says Yianna Coliandris, who works at the farmstand.

“Everyone was enjoying that, and it was absolutely thriving. It was beautiful, beautiful basil, and it tasted and smelled absolutely wonderful.”

But now customers will have to find basil elsewhere.

“This was the basil,” says Jane Presby, surveying a tenth of an acre of empty soil.

USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab via Flickr

Today on Word of Mouth, invasive species like Zebra Mussels to Asian Carp, are destroying biodiversity across North America. Or are they? Also, we'll look into China’s push to build a frozen food infrastructure. The number of urban Chinese households with a refrigerator has risen from just 7 percent to 95 percent in a decade. We’ll find out what that means for global climate change.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.


Ale Viyie via Flickr Creative Commons

For years, Market Basket has called itself the store where you get more for your dollar.

And those longtime customers who are currently boycotting the chain over the firing of longtime CEO Arthur T. Demoulas say they’re spending more on groceries as they’re patronizing other stores.

Those worried about their grocery budgets might pick up a few tips from Erik August Johnson.

vixyao via Flickr CC

New Hampshire bills itself as having a terrain for all seasons – the mountains offer climbing and skiing, the forests shelter innumerable hiking trails, and the lakes and rivers draw people in summer and winter alike. We speak with Lucie Bryar about some the state’s best spots for exploring. And, casual dining chains have been experimenting in extreme discounts. We take a look at the logic behind it and speak with one reporter who put these policies to the test. Then, in case you’ve run out of vacation ideas, we have a list of America’s ickiest attractions.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.


nseika via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/z98qI

The world of crowdfunding is awash in potato salad, thanks to a spud enthusiast in Ohio called Zack Danger Brown. Promising only that, upon raising ten dollars, he was going to make potato salad – “I haven't decided what kind yet” – Brown raised nearly $50,000 in two weeks on Kickstarter. (The total was well over $70,000 before Kickstarter cancelled several donations it said couldn’t be verified.)

Wacky Grilling Recipes From J.M. Hirsch

Jul 10, 2014
Chris Makarsky via Flickr Creative Commons

Recently, we talked to J.M. Hirsch, food editor for the Associated Press and author of Beating The Lunchbox Blues about his wacky grilling habit. He was kind enough to send us a couple of his recipes and told us a few more on air.

woodleywonderworks via Flickr Creative Commons

It’s been 25 years since Larry David’s “show-about-nothing” debuted on NBC, but it lives on. Recently a critic made the argument that Seinfeld not only transformed the sitcom but paved the way for television’s anti-hero dramas. Plus, not even a month into summer, you may already be approaching capacity on grilled burgers and hot dogs. JM Hirsch, food editor for the Associated Press joins us to inject new ideas into the outdoor cooking season. And, a sneak peak of bands heading to western Massachusetts for this weekend’s Green River Festival.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.


A food market can be a cultural center for a neighborhood. The owner of an Asian market in Manchester is hoping to become just that, but first he must find a new space for his store. To learn more about the Saigon Asian Market we turned to Mark Hayward of the Union Leader who has written about the market’s struggle with the Manchester Zoning Board of Adjustment:

What can you tell us about this store and about its owner?

Word Of Mouth Voted Best N.H. Radio Talk Show

Jun 26, 2014

We are so proud to have been voted Best New Hampshire Radio Talk Show by the readers of New Hampshire Magazine.

Six years after launching Word of Mouth, we still feel like upstarts and appreciate our listeners coming through. Thank you!  It's pleasure to bring you stories that spark curiosity and wonder about the world around us, and will continue spreading interesting information the best way we know how: through Word of Mouth.

And not only was Word of Mouth voted Best New Hampshire Radio Talk Show, but NHPR was voted Best FM Radio Station!

With all that in mind, here is a look back at some of your favorite Word of Mouth stories from the past year.

The school year is drawing to a close, but next week a group of teens in Salem are heading back to the classroom - and the kitchen.

They're taking part in the Junior Chef program, a partnership between the Boys and Girls Club of Greater Salem and the Tuscan Kitchen restaurant.

Eddie Payne is an executive chef with the Tuscan Kitchen. He describes the program to NHPR's Brady Carlson.

Kaytee Riek via flickr Creative Commons

According to the calendar, it’s still spring for a few more days, but some music critics have already anointed the song of the summer. Today on Word of Mouth we’ll reveal the warm-weather anthem you’ll be hearing all summer long. Plus, for soccer-loving countries, the World Cup inspires passion, patriotism, and songs, bad ones. We’ll listen to a selection of the worst songs also inspired by the World Cup, from around the world.

Listen to the full show and click Read More for individual segments.


The CareGivers  is dedicated to helping elders stay in their homes, and provides services that help them do so. Elsie relies on the CareGivers for help grocery shopping and getting to appointments. And each month, she welcomes a volunteer from the CareGivers Caring Cupboard food pantry.

erix! via Flickr Creative Commons

You’ve seen the studies: wearing seatbelts makes you happier! Facebook users are depressed! The internet harms teenage brains! But how reliable are these studies? Today Word of Mouth puts social science to the test. Then we continue with a look into a curious tradition that has been lost over the years: funeral cookies, “A snack called death.” Plus, venture capitalists in Silicon Valley aren’t just banking on the future of tech, they’re pouring money into the future of food… why one start-up is spending millions on an eggless-egg.

Listen to the full show and click read more for individual segments.


WalterPro4755 via Flickr Creative Commons

In 1986 there were an estimated 50,000 Civil War re-enactors in the U.S. Since 2000 their ranks have been cut in half. Today on Word of Mouth: the decline of Civil War reenactments, and what drives someone to take on the identity of a 19th century solider. Plus, after millennia of selective breeding, there are now over 3000 known varieties of apple. But, are our beloved Galas and Honeycrisps in peril? Why the extinction of wild apple species in central Asia could spell disaster for their descendants. And, when it comes to rice, why brown may not be the healthier.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments


The 2014 Locavore Index again ranks New Hampshire's local food system as one of the strongest in the country, rating third behind Vermont and Maine.

Martin Langeveld of Strolling of the Heifers, the Vermont organization which produces the Locavore Index, talks with All Things Considered host Brady Carlson about how New Hampshire's food system is growing and changing.

Courtesy Niall Kennedy via Flickr/Creative Commons.

The work of the New Hampshire Food Bank is well established in the state, providing millions of pounds of food every year to food pantries and soup kitchens north and south. Less well-known, perhaps, are the programs it has developed that address the causes of hunger -- helping people get training that leads to employment and to food security.
 

Dartmouth College - that hallowed, prestigious Ivy League institution of higher learning - is now home to a food truck.

It's known as The Box, and it will serve Mediterranean-style sandwiches, salads and other foods, while giving students at the Tuck School of Business a chance to manage and operate a private, for-profit business.

Rustic Crust Pushes To Restart Production In April

Mar 17, 2014
American Flatbread Pizza
Kelly Garbato / Flickr Creative Commons

  Construction crews are working two shifts a day to open a temporary facility for the Rustic Crust company in Pittsfield.  Earlier this month a fire burned down its production facility.

About a decade ago, Marion Nestle made waves when she published her groundbreaking book “Food Politics,” now considered by many to be one of the founding documents of the movement to reform the American food system.   In it, Nestle criticized the high quality, low quantity eating habits encouraged by the food industry and how many lawmakers in Washington have been influenced by the deep pockets of big agriculture and big food.

5 Reasons Why Monks Are Awesome

Feb 24, 2014
byourself_4 via flickr Creative Commons

What's cooler than being cool? Ice cold... monastic beer. Yes, beer brewed by monks. There is a relatively high possibility that monks (yes, monks) are cooler than you. And I'm not sorry, because they do some pretty darn awesome stuff. Here are 5 reasons why monks are  way awesome:

2.24.14: Modern & Monastic Food

Feb 24, 2014
michaelmossbooks.com and Victoria Reay, Holly Hayes & William Jones via flickr Creative Commons

Prepare your palate, because we're bringing you a smorgasbord of stories; today's Word of Mouth is all about food! But taste with caution, sandwiched between stories of slime and frozen meat are stories of monastic meals and heavenly... beer? That's right, beer that was divinely sanctioned. Grab a snack and take a listen. You'll never think of food the same way again.

Listen to our full show and click Read More for individual segments.

Cheryl Senter

Kids Culinary Arts teaches kids cooking and nutrition during after school programs, vacations and summer camps. The organization works in school districts and towns to get kids cooking and eating healthy foods. Matthew and Nicole Heiter, 11 and nine years old, have become experienced hands in the kitchen. Their mother, Lauren credits Kids Culinary Arts.

This week the James Beard Awards recognized three Granite Staters in their list of semifinalists, two of whom are in the category for Best Chef Northeast.

Taylor Quimby for NHPR

For the parents of young children, getting out to a nice restaurant can require some tricky logistics.   Between babysitters, winter colds, and sheer exhaustion, it’s understandable when parents ditch romantic efforts in lieu of pajamas and another night of bad TV. But why not have a date night from the comfort of home?  My wife Tiffany and I discovered a way to enjoy the both of best worlds…sort of.

Want to know more about Plated, the service featured in this piece? Here's their website. 

Doug88888 via Flickr Creative Commons

As editor of The New York Time’s “Modern Love” column since 2004, our guest Daniel Jones has read over 50,000 love letters.  Well, not love letters exactly, but letters about love.  Okay, and most of them aren’t actual physical letters, but emails.  Which says a lot about the state of romance in 2014, given how much of it sparks, burns, and is often extinguished from behind a computer screen.  Technology’s impact on modern love features heavily in Jones’ new book “Love Illuminated: Exploring Life’s Most Mystifying Subject with the Help of 50,000 Strangers”.

This week on Foodstuffs, we connect the Granite State to the food traditions of Iraq.

Nawal Nasrallah of Salem is author of the book Delights From The Garden Of Eden, which not only includes Iraqi recipes but traces the history of the country’s cuisine. Saveur magazine named it one of the top 10 cookbooks of 2013.

Every chair lift ride up Pats Peak in Henniker looks full on this mild winter day. Skiers and snowboarders are coming down the mountain, one after the other.

Joni Aubin and her colleagues spent much of the day before getting ready for these crowds – and not just on the slopes, either. Though she manages the snow sports office, Aubin helped out in the Tradewinds Café, wrapping up stacks of a Pats Peak specialty: the giant M&M cookie.

Jackie Newgent RDN, CDN via Flickr/CC - http://www.flickr.com/photos/jackie_newgent/11072560865/in/photolist-hSrLzP-7kUgGc-5CfzCM-aLpi5P-4dAm1v-7T2r4-aLphsD-aLpmcB-aLpiPV-aLph9t-aLpkZv-aLpjog-aLpkvi-aLpgKk-aLpkGR-aLpkPV-aLpgXZ-aLphN6-aLpfGD-aLphdT-6gYqPv-

Chances are at least a few of us have once again vowed to eat healthy in the new year. And, chances are, those of us who have made that resolution will run into a big challenge: how do you eat healthy when you're eating out?

Susan Laughlin of New Hampshire Magazine has been pondering this very question, and she has some encouraging tips - mostly related to soup.

Phil Nolan via Flickr Creative Commons

New Year’s Eve is a day of indulgence, the last chance to gorge on delicious treats and beverages before cleaning the slate. What’s on your menu tonight? Does it involve kale or Siracha, or a Cronut? According to our guest J.M. Hirsch, food editor at the Associated Press, those were among the hottest foods of 2013.

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