Foodstuffs

Foodstuffs
7:00 am
Sat October 26, 2013

How To Turn Your Jack-O-Lantern Into Tasty Pumpkin Goodness

Credit Jason Dean / Flickr Creative Commons

With pumpkin season in full swing, many Granite Staters are enjoying baked goods, snacks, and beverages flavored with this signature fall fruit.  And then, of course, there's the annual rite of pumpkin carving. Weekend Edition host Amanda Loder talked with The Heart of New England e-magazine's Marcia Passos Duffy about how to wring pumpkin flavor out of post-Halloween jack-o-lantern remains.

Read more
Word of Mouth
11:56 am
Tue October 22, 2013

Eating One Of The Hottest Peppers On Earth...For Sport

About 250 times hotter than a jalapeño, the Naga King Chili was even used in a weapon made by the Indian military.
Credit Aaron Joel Santos / Novus Select via Smithsonian.org

The scoville scale is used to measure how spicy as pepper or chili is. The jalapeno can have a rating as high as 8,000 units, and for many sensitive palates, that’s plenty. The world’s hottest peppers approach an incredible 1.5 million scoville units – so hot, a tribe in northeast India consumes them for sport. Best-selling science writer Mary Roach visited the Naga tribes to observe their competitive and cultural history with the scorching Naga King Chili.  Roach is author of many books – most recently is Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal… and she wrote about the Naga King Chili for Smithsonian magazine.

Read more
Foodstuffs
3:40 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

In Which A Man Named Mario Finds And Eats A Giant Mushroom

Mario Mollica says hen of the woods mushrooms mimic the look of the oak trees around which they grow.
Credit thegardenbuzz via Flickr/CC - http://www.flickr.com/photos/thegardenbuzz/5037450393/in/photostream/

When we say giant mushroom, we mean it - a two foot long, 30 pound mushroom found in Salem.

Read more
All Things Considered
12:33 pm
Thu October 10, 2013

Giants Among Us: A Family Fights For Pumpkin Supremacy

David, Matt and Erin Patterson pose with the prize of the patch.
Credit Shaina Gates / NHPR

The Pattersons, Matt and Erin, live off a quiet road in New Ipswich.

Dirt driveway on the left, beige house in the middle, pumpkins on the right.

“So this is it,” says Erin. “This is Lola.”

Lola is the prize of the patch this year. She sits heavy in the garden, bigger than you can get your arms around.

More yellow than orange, the pumpkin is hidden behind a partition of burlap.

Read more
Foodstuffs
5:27 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Inside The Traditional New England Church Bean Supper

Bean suppers are a traditional part of New England food.
Credit lynn.gardner via Flickr/CC - http://www.flickr.com/photos/grandgrrl/3357596727/in/photolist-67GywK-exGGoJ-exDuSx-exGGhh-exDuX8-exGG2q-67Gyw8-exGG9S-cPneUY-5wQkFS-7A7gmP-6YEa91-8HTFkt-8JCqPh-7xuzf2-4eeMcC-a25S97-dmHoJs-dmHo3w-dmHmdX-8JCqjw-8JCqoy-8JznKn-5x

New Hampshire food has been moving in plenty of new directions lately, but some old traditions are carrying on in this part of the country too, including the church bean supper.

Susan Laughlin is food editor for New Hampshire Magazine; she took part in a supper in Boscawen and wrote about the experience in the October issue. She talks with All Things Considered host Brady Carlson about what she expected to see at the dinner and what she found instead.

Read more
NH News
4:51 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Orchards Compete For A Slice Of The 'Pick Your Own' Pie

Pick-your-own is increasingly where the money is for New Hampshire orchards
Credit She Shimmers via Flickr Creative Commons

Fall in New Hampshire means fairs, foliage – and getting out to one of the state's 300-odd apple orchards to pick your own. Elaine Starkey is out at Butternut Farm in Farmington, with her sons and grandkids, to do just that.

"They usually have donuts, but we got here a little late."

'Pick Your Own Apples' now means not just picking the fruit, but also hay rides, corn mazes, petting animals, And enjoying other seasonal products, like cider, pies, and yes, donuts. 

Read more
Foodstuffs
3:57 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Put Free Coffee On Laconia's Main Street, And People Will Come

Kevin Grollo (left) of Woodshed Coffee Roasters shows off some of the local blend at the New Hampshire Coffee Festival in Laconia.
Brady Carlson, NHPR

Organizers expected a nice, somewhat modest turnout for the first try at a New Hampshire Coffee Festival. But then, putting a sign out on Main Street that essentially says “free coffee” has a tendency to over-deliver.

“I literally cried in awe of the turnout and the people coming downtown to celebrate the Coffee Festival with us," promotions committee member Lori Chandler said.

Read more
Foodstuffs
12:00 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Steam Cream: Ice Cream Powered By Steam

Clem Legates and wife scooping steam cream.
Ryan Lessard NHPR

If you’re looking for an uncommon food experience, very few are as rare as Steam Cream, a small batch of ice cream produced in New Hampshire only once a year.  


Read more
Word of Mouth
12:15 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

Farming...In Space!

Credit Courtesy NASA.gov

If you think there are too many food deserts in cities across the United States, try finding some fresh produce in outer space.  Naturally, NASA makes sure astronauts living on the International Space Station don’t go hungry, but since it costs about $10,000 to send a single pound of food to the I.S.S., you can bet they don’t see a lot of leafy greens.

That cost is just one reason growing fresh food in outer space is a crucial step in the future of manned space exploration.  Jesse Hirsch is a staff writer for Modern Farmer, where you can find his article, “Space Farming: The Final Frontier”. 

Read more
Foodstuffs
5:46 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

Reflections On Food, And Faith, At Greek Fest

Susan Harris (left) and Mary Garci serve traditional Greek recipes at the Greek Fest at Taxiarchai Orthodox Church in Laconia.
Brady Carlson, NHPR

This time of year is full of food fests, including a preponderance of Greek fests.

Food is, of course, a central part of Greek culture, and as we found at a festival in Laconia, that means a look at the food can reveal something deeper.

Read more
Word of Mouth
1:58 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

The Shocking Truth Behind Pistachio Pricing: The Ones With Shells Cost MORE!

Pistachios with shells: 8 oz. Pistachios shelled: 6 oz
Taylor Quimby NHPR

When it comes to food I can be a bit of a cheapskate. If I can’t tell the difference between two similar products, the first thing I look at to determine which to buy is the price tag. But sometimes, being a frugal shopper means more than picking the right brand – sometimes it’s about getting your hands dirty. 

Take pistachios for example. I always buy them with the shells on.  Why?  Because they’re cheaper. Presumably, consumers are paying extra for the privilege of not having to split a thumbnail cracking them open. But when we asked around the office at our Concord studios, it turned out there were lots of reasons people choose to buy whole pistachios.

Read more
Foodstuffs
1:51 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

How Much Variety Is There In New Hampshire's Breakfast Places?

Julien's Corner Kitchen in Manchester.
Brady Carlson, NHPR

My toddler, Owen, and I agree on most things when we go out for breakfast. We prefer booth seats over chairs, sharing is always encouraged at the table, and we always go for crayons and coloring books when they're offered.

The one difference? He, being two years old, prizes consistency in his breakfasts - the more similar they are to the last breakfast outing, the better. In fact, he doesn't use the word "breakfast" for these trips - "I wanna go out for pancakes," he says. 

Read more
Foodstuffs
5:39 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

Some School Vending Machines Are Cutting Back On Sugary Drinks

Part of the effort to curb child obesity in the US has been to rethink vending machines – in particular, those offering sugary drinks at schools. The theory is that students make healthier choices when they have healthier options in front of them.

And new research from Dartmouth College shows the contents of those machines are changing – less sugar, more bottled water. But not every school is changing in the same way.

Read more
Foodstuffs
11:28 am
Fri August 30, 2013

Getting Corn While We Can

Piney Woods Farm
Michael Samuels

Now is the time for fresh, local corn, and farm stands are doing a brisk business as summer comes to an end.

Read more
Word of Mouth
12:15 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Lobster's Journey From Trashy Food To Fancy Feast

Credit The Vault DFW via Flickr Creative Commons

As the summer winds down, so will demand for lobster and its market price. Maine lobstermen are bemoaning low wholesale prices, but far from shore, say New York City’s Lobster Joint, market price today for a roll is $19…a boiled lobster will cost your $34. Today, the crustaceans are coveted, and symbolic of wealth, class, and extravagant living. Not so long ago, lobster was considered lower than the ocean floor on which it dwells. Here to trace its climb up the social ladder from grub for the poor to high-class delicacy is Daniel Luzer, Web Editor at the Washington Monthly. We found his article, “Low Lobster Got Fancy,” in Pacific Standard.

Read more

Pages