Forest

Something Wild
12:00 am
Fri July 4, 2014

Something Wild: The Challenge Of Choosing A National Tree

California redwoods
Brian Hoffman via flickr Creative Commons

If today's installment of Something Wild fell to my NH Audubon cohorts, it would be easy to feature our national symbol, the Bald Eagle--perfect for patriotic Fourth of July! Instead, "NH Forest Guy" wracks his brain to make a tree connection to our nation's birthday. All I could come up with is that bottle rockets are affixed to wooden sticks and that firecrackers and other pyrotechnics are constructed and packaged using cardboard and paper--all derived from tree. No trees? No fireworks!

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Something Wild
9:28 am
Fri May 23, 2014

Water In The Trees

A yellow birch "leaking" water.
Credit Dave Anderson

The patter of rain. Fingers of wind comb the canopy of tender leaves. These are exotic sounds of the new tree canopy in late May. New Hampshire forests are adapted to withstand rigors of wind and weather. Leaf structures reflect inner tree plumbing we rarely consider.

Tubes of the water-moving "xylem" are coiled like springs that stretch and recoil to some degree and not break the tension of water in these drinking straws.  Stem fibers of differing lengths break at different stress points

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Newscast
3:16 pm
Sun May 18, 2014

White Mountains Campgrounds Open, But Beware Slick Footing

Credit Bryan Pocius / Flickr Creative Commons

Campgrounds in New Hampshire's White Mountain National Forest are open, but the Forest Service is warning people that some areas still have snow, and spring melt-off can lead to some slippery footing.  The Forest Service says heavy rainfall and slower seasonal changes also can cause stream crossings to be high and footing slick. Campers also need to be wary of bears and invasive insects.  Campers are advised to properly store all food and drink, and empty food wrappers.  Campers can introduce invasive insects to the area by bringing firewood from home; they need to buy firewood locally.

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Something Wild
6:28 am
Fri April 25, 2014

Tiny Tree Flowers

Spring blossoms of our largest plants - woody trees - are small and inconspicuous. Trees flower early - before leaves emerge. While showy wildflowers on the forest floor rely on specialized insect pollinators, forest trees do not.

Trees rely on wind-pollination of flowers to yield summer seeds and autumn nuts. Flowering before leaves emerge ensures greater air circulation among pollen-producing male stamens and female pistils containing ovaries.

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Something Wild
12:00 am
Fri April 4, 2014

Saw-Whet Owls

Northern saw-whet owl.
Credit Kent McFarland via flickr Creative Commons

There are a lot of unusual sounds out there in the natural world. Here’s one from the nighttime forest, often heard this time of year.

Hey, is that a bus backing up?

No, it’s not a school bus backing up.

It’s a tiny owl, the northern saw-whet, and it’s a lot more common than bird surveys suggest. As you might imagine, small birds active only at night are not easy to survey. Also important to note is that because they're the favorite meal of the much larger barred owl, their survival depends on keeping a low profile—usually under cover of dense conifers.

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Something Wild
12:00 am
Fri January 31, 2014

Snow: An Ally For Winter Survival

Credit Tom Petrus via flickr Creative Commons

Got snow? That's probably a sore subject for many in New England this time of year, but in the woods, snow is not an enemy--a scourge to be shoveled, scraped and plowed out of the way. In nature, snow is a trusted ally to plants and wildlife. Snow acts as a blanket, a source of camouflage, a form of concealment,  and even a sponge. 

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Something Wild
12:18 am
Fri December 13, 2013

Forest Succession

Kyle Harms, Louisianna State University

"Forest succession" is a pattern of plant regeneration that begins when a plot of land is left to its own devices. The first phase of this succession is bare soil or an abandoned field. And nature, over the span of decades, converts the area through several stages to mature forest – if left undisturbed.

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Environment
4:13 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

USDA Airdrops Vanilla-Flavored Rabies Vaccines Over Eastern Forests

Raccoons were the animal most frequently found rabies positive in 2013 in New Hampshire
Credit fatedsnowfox / Flickr Creative Commons

The United States Department of Agriculture is distributing vanilla flavored rabies vaccine packets from airplanes over New Hampshire. The packets will show up in Coos and Grafton counties as part of 5-state pilot study of a new rabies vaccine.

The vaccines are thrown from 500 feet from a small aircraft over rural areas and distributed by hand in towns. They’re vanilla flavored, which trials have shown to be a favorite flavor for critters.

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Something Wild
6:00 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Forest Pharmacy

Credit Forest Society

The Chairman of the Society of Forest Medicine at Nippon Medical School in Tokyo, Japan Dr. Qing Li, studies nature’s effect on the human immune system. A person’s natural immune cells called “NK cells” can be reliably measured in a lab. NK cells function like white blood cells to increase resistance to illness including cancer by sending self-destruct messages to tumors and virus-infected cells. Stress, aging and pesticides reduce NK counts.

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Giving Matters
12:00 am
Sat February 23, 2013

Managing Forest Land With Help From Monadnock Conservancy

Courtesy, Monadnock Conservancy

Jack Calhoun and his siblings donated the 310-acre Calhoun Family Forest to the Monadnock Conservancy. They wanted the tract to be managed as their parents had managed it -- as a sustainable timber resource, for public use, education and conservation.

Jack: This property is an aggregation of properties that my parents bought; and over the years, they managed it for sustainable timber, for wildlife, and for protection of water resources

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Something Wild
8:15 am
Fri January 4, 2013

Walls in Winter Woods

Credit via sogrady, Flickr Creative Commons

Experts estimate that by 1871 there were more 250,000 miles of stonewalls throughout in New England and New York—enough to circle the earth ten times. The majority of New England stonewalls were built between 1810 and 1840. Naturalist, Tom Wessels refers to these decades when forests were cleared to pastures enclosed by stonewalls as "Sheep Fever." He calculates the mass of stone in walls to be greater than the Great Pyramids of Egypt suggesting stonewalls should rightfully be considered "the eighth wonder of the world."

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Something Wild
12:00 am
Fri November 23, 2012

Restoring the American Chestnut

Thanksgiving leftovers in my kitchen include Chinese chestnut-stuffing. Most people know that our American chestnut trees were decimated by an Asian fungus detected in 1904 that killed untold billions of trees and wiped-out one of the most common and most important lumber and wildlife trees from eastern forests before 1940.

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The Exchange
9:00 am
Thu November 15, 2012

The Fate of New Hampshire's Forests

New Hampshire is the second most forested state in the country, but according to our guest today, UNH Professor and Ecologist, Scott Olinger, our forests face serious challenges from climate change to invasive species.  Today on the Exchange, we're looking at what's happening to our trees, what cane be done to protect them and the environmental significance of our forests.

Guest

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Something Wild
12:00 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Forest vs. Tree Cover

We were all duped by media reports this summer that NH had exceeded Maine for the highest percentage of forest cover in the US. Apparently, we're just not "seeing the forest for the trees." 

A classic “apples to oranges” comparison reported New Hampshire’s “89% tree cover” now qualifies us as the “most-forested” state in the nation.

FACT #1: A USDA Northern Forest Research and Syracuse University study determined NH tree cover is 89% - and yes, that is higher overall than Maine’s percent tree cover.

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Environment
12:44 pm
Fri September 14, 2012

Destructive Invasive Beetle Creeps Closer to NH

Flikr Creative Commons / MJIphotos

The Emerald Ash Borer, an invasive Asian beetle that has killed millions of Ash trees in the Great Lakes region, is creeping closer to New Hampshire.

This week an Emerald Ash Borer infestation was found in the Berkshires in Western Massachusetts. The pest has spread from Michigan, through the Mid-Atlantic region, to upstate New York and Connecticut.

Kyle Lombard with the division of Forested Lands says, on its own the ash borer moves very slowly.

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