forest health

Could It Happen Here? Fighting Forest Fires in N.H.

Oct 25, 2017
KEN WATSON / KENWATSON.NET

While Western blazes are common, wildfires in California this year have been especially devastating.  Meanwhile, New Hampshire has been battling a persistent forest fire this fall, on the Dilly Cliffs near the Lost River Gorge area of Woodstock. We examine how often we see forest fires in New Hampshire, and the effects of drought and future climate change. We also discuss how  local, state and federal agencies approach fire-fighting and forest ecosystems. 

Jimmy Baikovicius via flickr Creative Commons

Today’s topic is perfect for the fall season: cleaning up the leaves. Yes, it’s that time of year again, and if you hate raking as much as we do we’ve got some good news for you. It really doesn’t have to be so…well…impulsive.

Protecting N.H.'s Forests and Trees

Aug 30, 2016
Richard Brunner

New Hampshire’s landscape is full of beautiful sights, sounds and smells - and with very few exceptions, trees. While trees fill our state and have stood tall for decades, they also encounter invasive insects and extreme weather that threaten their health. From backyards to secluded state parks, trees are the background for much that happens in the Granite State. We look at the different ways that trees are protected and maintained throughout the state. 

This show was originally broadcast on 7/25/2016.

Jimmy Baikovicius via flickr Creative Commons

Today’s topic is perfect for the fall season: cleaning up the leaves. Yes, it’s that time of year again, and if you hate raking as much as we do we’ve got some good news for you. It really doesn’t have to be so…well…impulsive.

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

When you’re a transmission arborist, you spend a lot of time in a helicopter, cruising over power-lines.

“So here’s an example of non-compliant vegetation,” says Kurt Nelson who does this job for Eversource. He indicates some young pines growing underneath the tall transmission towers. They aren’t high enough to endanger the lines… yet.

“That’ll be a target for us,” says Nelson.

Kyle Harms, Louisianna State University

"Forest succession" is a pattern of plant regeneration that begins when a plot of land is left to its own devices. The first phase of this succession is bare soil or an abandoned field. And nature, over the span of decades, converts the area through several stages to mature forest – if left undisturbed.

Jimmy Baikovicius via flickr Creative Commons

Today’s topic is perfect for the fall season: cleaning up the leaves. Yes, it’s that time of year again, and if you hate raking as much as we do we’ve got some good news for you. It really doesn’t have to be so…well…impulsive.

Ancient tree-worshipers – Druids - believed mistletoe possessed magical powers because it grows high in bare oaks, shedding lush green leaves even in midwinter. Druids harvested mistletoe to hang in households to promote fertility. Translation of the folklore over centuries creates the holiday custom of hanging mistletoe to elicit a Christmas kiss.