Frank Guinta

Too see Frank Guinta's candidate page in our Elections 2014 coverage, click here.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

  Congressman Frank Guinta worked the counter -- and met with lobbyists from the National Association of Convenience Stores during a stop at Cumberland Farms in Portsmouth.

He said he would work to make sure compliance with federal regulations like the new food labelling law isn’t unwieldy for convenience stores:

I will now,  when I’m back in Washington,  take a look at the current rule. And there’s legislation to fix that – proposed legislation -- so I’m going to take a look at all of that.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

A stark choice was on display Monday night as Democrat Carol Shea-Porter and Republican Frank Guinta met for their final debate before the mid-term elections next week, televised live on WMUR TV.

In their three campaigns against one another, Guinta and Shea-Porter have debated more than a handful of times. They rarely agree on much.

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

When Democrat Carol Shea-Porter first ran for congress 8 years ago, few gave her much of a shot.  Most of the powers that be in the democratic party lined up behind someone else, and her campaign was a decidedly hand to mouth operation.

“Well nobody, got paid first of all, so you didn’t have to get that much money if nobody gets paid,” explains Caroline French. Back then she was in charge of making sure Shea-Porter got to her events on time.

French says that first campaign was won on pure enthusiasm.

NHPR / Michael Brindley

The 2014 election marks Republican Frank Guinta's third try at the 1st Congressional District seat.

The former mayor of Manchester won in 2010, riding a wave of anti-government, Tea Party sentiment to a resounding 54-42 defeat of Democratic incumbent Carol Shea-Porter.

Two years later, in a big year for Democrats, Shea-Porter returned the favor.

The two are now locked in a tight rematch.

At a house party in Rochester, Frank Guinta works the room, shaking hands with roughly 20 people gathered in the kitchen.

David Lane / Union Leader

First congressional district candidates Frank Guinta and Carol Shea-Porter met Tuesday night on NH1’s TV debate. Both candidates took aim at the other’s voting record in Washington.

Scroll down for audio of the full debate.

These candidates know each other well. This is the third time they’ve run against each other. And this debate often focused on refighting old battles.

Democrat Carol Shea-Porter was quick to blame Guinta and Republicans for the mandatory budget cuts known as sequestration.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Laura Knoy sits down with former U.S. Representative Frank Guinta for an in-depth discussion about the issues on New Hampshire voters’ minds this election season. This special broadcast is a part of our election series presented in partnership with the Rudman Center at the UNH School of Law.

More information about NHPR's special election series presented with UNH Law School can be found here.

GUEST:

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Republican Frank Guinta, who is running to regain the congressional seat he held for one term, says he and his opponent, Democratic incumbent Carol Shea-Porter, would have agreed on at least one vote. Guinta would have voted against the Obama administration’s current military campaign in Iraq and Syria.

In a conversation with NHPR’s Laura Knoy at the UNH School of Law’s Rudman Center, former Congressman Guinta said he would want more details on the president’s plan to arm moderate Syrian rebels.

Sara Plourde / NHPR

NHPR and UNH School of Law present

Frank Guinta
Republican candidate for US House of Representatives

October 7th at 5:30pm
Reception to follow

UNH School of Law, 2 White Street, Concord, NH

Join Laura Knoy for an in-depth discussion with the candidates about the issues on New Hampshire voters’ minds this election season. Each forum will be broadcast the following day during The Exchange at 9 am on the stations of NHPR.

Think of it as a rematch of a rematch.

In New Hampshire, Democratic Congresswoman Carol Shea-Porter is battling Republican Frank Guinta for the third time in a row. Each has beaten the other before – Guinta defeated Shea-Porter during the 2010 Tea Party wave, and Shea-Porter won her seat back in 2012.

You wonder if it starts to get boring when you're hitting the same rival over and over again.

"Well, I know what he's going to say, that's for sure," says Shea-Porter.
Guinta admits the same: "I mean, it is kind of old hat."

New Hampshire's Congressional candidates agree that maintaining a strong national defense and protecting civil liberties are not mutually exclusive responsibilities, though they disagree on how to strike a balance between the two.

Josh Rogers/NHPR

The unity message could be heard from the podium and heard from the banquet room floor -- and not simply from the usual suspects.

“The Democrats will say this is all for show, Republicans will keep fighting, and will beat them by letting them split hairs and they will stay home.”

That’s Kentucky Senator Rand Paul, who keynoted the breakfast.

“So I want to show N.H. today, what I want to show the country, is that we are unified.”

Here’s former N.H. House Speaker Bill O’Brien:

AP Photo

Former ambassador John Bolton's Political Action Committee, or PAC, is endorsing and contributing money to two more candidates in New Hampshire, Republican House hopefuls Frank Guinta and Marilinda Garcia. 

Bolton was President George W. Bush's ambassador to the United Nations. His political action committee is backing about two dozen candidates for federal office, including Guinta and Garcia, who won their primaries on Tuesday. 

Sara Plourde / NHPR

Five days before the primary, more than $3.1 million has been spent on behalf of Republican candidates seeking to advance to the general election against New Hampshire’s Congressional incumbents.

In District 2, a seat held by Democratic Rep. Anne Kuster, Gary Lambert has outspent state Rep. Marilinda Garcia by a slight margin, $277,000 to $239,860, according to the most recent filings with the Federal Election Commission.

Republican candidates in the 1st Congressional District squared off Tuesday for their final debate before the Sept. 9 primary.

With the news earlier in the day that a second American journalist had died at the hands of the Islamic State, discussion on the conflict in Iraq was at the forefront Tuesday night.

Frank Guinta said the country needs to "eliminate and eradicate ISIS," but when pressed on whether that meant boots on the ground, the former Congressman balked.

With less than two weeks before the primary, candidates for U.S. House of Representatives have filed their Federal Election Commission disclosures for July 1 through Aug. 20. 

In Congressional District 1, Republican upstart Daniel Innis ended the period with $67,000 cash on hand, well below the $188,000 of his opponent Frank Guinta.

Guinta outpaced Innis in fundraising during the period by a margin of $34,000 to $23,000, but also reported $289,000 in debt.

Innis loaned his campaign $10,000.

Republicans hoping to unseat New Hampshire's U.S. House incumbents are split on recent legislation to address the crisis on the U.S.-Mexico border.

The $694 million bill passed by the House on Aug. 1 would increase spending for overwhelmed border agencies, add more immigration judges and detention spaces, and alter a 2008 anti-trafficking law to permit Central American children to be sent back home without deportation hearings.

Courtesy image

Frank Guinta held the District 1 seat in the U.S. House of Representatives from 2010 to 2012, when he was defeated by the current incumbent, Democrat Carol Shea-Porter.

Guinta, who has also served as a state representative and mayor of Manchester, is one of four Republicans competing in September's primary for the right to challenge Shea-Porter in November.

Frank Guinta joined me in NHPR's studio to talk about the race and his stance on some of the issues. (Scroll down to find the full audio of our interview with Guinta, as well as the version edited for broadcast.) 

2014 Primaries and Elections: A Look Ahead

Jul 9, 2014
meagan_taylor / Flickr/CC

With summer officially here, it’s not just the weather heating up, but the political season as well. There are polls, ads, debates being scheduled, and big-name politicians coming in to support candidates. There's also already some drama, with one contender dropping out and another’s residency being questioned.  We’re looking at how the U.S. Congress, Senate, and N.H. Governor races are shaping up so far.

GUESTS:

afagen / Flickr Creative Commons

In mid-March, with the sap has hardly running, November seems a lifetime away. But in the political world, eight months goes by quickly, especially for those preparing for mid-term elections. Although the filing period isn’t until June, there’s already a solid list of Republicans hoping to face the three Democratic incumbents. In the 1st Congressional District, former Congressman Frank Guinta and former UNH business school Dean Dan Innis look to go against Carol Shea Porter. In Congressional District 2, state Rep.

Candidate's Facebook Profile

Dan Innis, a Republican Candidate for Congress in New Hampshire’s first district, has released a proposal for reforming the country’s budget. The former Dean of the UNH Business School Dan has proposed requiring that a budget be passed every two years and enforcing a strict timeline on the budget process. He is also calling for tax code reform: closing loopholes and eliminating deductions in order to broaden the tax base.

Zach Nugent / NHPR

The tightest race in New Hampshire lived up to expectations last night. Carol Shea-Porter eked out a victory over Frank Guinta by four points, or just fewer than 14,000 votes.

While the race was close all the way through, indications that it would be a good night for Shea-Porter rolled in early. It was the wee hours of the morning when Carol Shea-Porter thanked a dwindling crowd of night-owl supporters for handing her back the seat in the US House of Representatives that she lost two-years ago.

NHPR / Sam Evans-Brown

This race is real bellwether for a number of reasons: the district itself demographically perfectly balanced between liberal and conservative voters, both candidates have held the seat before meaning they are more-or-less on equal footing in terms of name recognition, and both are party stalwarts have voted with their partys’ leadership high in 90th the percentile.

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

This time around in the first congressional district the names are the same but the roles are flipped; Republican Frank Guinta, once the challenger, is now the incumbent. But that’s not the only way this year’s race is like a mirror image of last election.

When Congressman Frank Guinta goes out knocking on the doors of independents in Manchester – his political backyard – most everybody knows who he is.

Guinta: Good Morning!

Jason Meserve, NHPR

This week we continue our series on jobs and the economy by talking to the candidates in the 1st congressional district.

We start with the incumbent, Republican Frank Guinta of Manchester. He talks with All Things Considered host Brady Carlson.

Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee

The Guinta campaign has taken issue with another television ad in the race for the first congressional district. This is just the latest salvo of the tit-for-tat that has characterized the contest.

Guinta’s campaign is upset about an ad from the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, because it makes the following claim…

Ad: Frank Guinta voted to make you pay over $1,000 dollars a year more in taxes.

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

The campaigns of Carol Shea-Porter and Frank Guinta are trading sharp words over a Shea-Porter ad claiming Guinta voted to cut money for veterans’ programs. The ad that Shea-Porter’s campaign released last week stuck to the aggressive tone that the former congresswoman has adopted this election cycle.

Abby Goldstein / NHPR

New Hampshire’s first district candidates for Congress battled Monday in a debate moderated by NHPR’s Laura Knoy. The topics for discussion stayed within the realm of economic policy and job creation and energy policy was among the stickier points.

Much of the debate between Congressman Frank Guinta and former Congresswoman Carol Shea-Porter was an argument of who should and should not receive federal tax dollars. This was highlighted when the candidates were asked how they would address the rising cost of energy.

Wednesday, a House vote to repeal the Affordable Care Act has passed 244 to 185.

Both New Hampshire Congressmen voted to repeal the nation’s healthcare law.

Many have called this vote symbolic. Charlie Bass says this new vote was triggered by the Supreme Court decision to uphold the law. But, he says, he considers it a kickoff to congressional races for re-election.

Ryan Lessard / NHPR

A group of about twenty five demonstrators, organized by the AFL-CIO, petitioned Congressman Frank Guinta’s office to support the anti-outsourcing legislation known as the Bring Jobs Home Act.

The Supreme Court’s decision on the health care law threw many lawmakers in Washington for a loop.

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