government shutdown

File Photo / NHPR

U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen says by getting to work now on a long-term spending plan, Congress can hopefully avoid another last-minute deal like the one reached earlier this week.

Senator Shaheen says one of the positive things to come out of the resolution to the partial government was the establishment of a committee of conference focused on crafting a federal budget.

During a stop at a business in Salem on Friday, Shaheen says that committee has already started its work.

Walsh TD via Flickr Creative Commons

Following the resolution of the partial government shutdown, officials at the White Mountain National Forest say they’ll be back to a full staff of 120 employees by the end of the week.

Forest Supervisor Tom Wagner says he received official word late Wednesday night, and began calling employees back to work first thing Thursday morning.

“I probably have about 50 percent of my workforce back now, and the remainder will be up and operational tomorrow at 8 o’clock in the morning.”

The shutdown forced the national forest to cut its staff down to roughly 16 employees.

Big Machine Records

Before the legislature agreed on a deal yesterday, we asked for your contribution to our Un-official Partial Shutdown Playlist – music reflecting your feelings about how our government has been functioning, or not functioning these past two weeks. A number of you contributed to the list by posting your picks on Facebook, Twitter, and by calling our listener hotline.

Many in the nation breathed a sigh of relief on the news that the standoff was over on Capitol Hill, the deal makes our collective shutdown playlist a little un-necessary, but we’re pretty happy it didn’t need such a long run.

Perhaps our collective effort had something to do with the shutdown ending...for now.

via weknowmemes.com

Well, the United States has survived another fiscal standoff--for now. Just a few hours before midnight, Republican Legislatures conceded and agreed on a deal to fund government operations until January 15, 2014. The deal ended 16 days of a partial federal shutdown, and today the gears of government sputtered back to life. The crisis was no laughing matter for furloughed workers and worried economists – but, provided plenty of grist for online memes and jokesters. With the fiasco behind us – for now – we’re looking at how the government showdown played out online. Brady Carlson is with us, NHPR’s host of All Things Considered and our regular web culture analyst.

Politics Of The Shutdown

Oct 17, 2013
jessie owen / Flickr Creative Commons

Granite State politicians weigh in on the politics in Washington that led to the shutdown, as well as the way forward.

Guests:

  • Ray Buckley- Chairman of New Hampshire Democratic Party
  • Gene Chandler- Republican House Minority Leader from Bartlett.
  • Andy Smith - Director of the UNH Survey Center and Associate Professor of Political Science

Callout:

  • Tim Carter - Leader of the Lakes Region Tea Party

New Hampshire Senator Kelly Ayotte is applauding a deal reached by Senate leadership to raise the debt ceiling and bring an end to the partial government shutdown.

Appearing on MSNBC this afternoon, Ayotte, a Republican, says the shutdown went on far too long.

“And that’s why I’m glad we got out of our trenches, that we’re resolving this, that we are moving on. And I’m hoping that we can solve the greater fiscal challenges facing the nation by coming together.”

SpeakerBoehner / Flickr Creative Commons

With a deadline looming for the US to hit its borrowing limit, and amid a lengthening partial federal shutdown, we’re looking at the latest efforts in Washington to resolve this, and also at the impact on our country and our state.

Guest:

  • Matthew J. Slaughter is professor and associate dean at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College. He is also currently an adjunct Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and a member of the Congressional Budget Office's Panel of Economic Advisers.

U.S. Reps. Annie Kuster and Carol Shea-Porter of New Hampshire have signed a petition that would force a vote to end the federal government shutdown.

The two Democrats agree that it's time for a vote to reopen the government nearly two weeks into what Kuster called a damaging shutdown that is hurting Granite State families and businesses.

The discharge petition is a special congressional procedure that would allow a majority of voters to force a vote on a bill to reopen the government.

NHPR / Michael Brindley

With the government shutdown now in its second week, there’s growing bipartisan concern in New Hampshire about the impact on state tourism and the local economy.

But there’s a difference of opinion on who’s to blame in Washington.

With Columbus Day weekend approaching, nearly two dozen campgrounds on federal land in the White Mountain National Forest remain closed due to the shutdown.

State Representative Warren Groen of Rochester says the state’s tourists and business owners are paying the price.

starbuck77 / Flickr Creative Commons

A week into a government shutdown, with a looming debt ceiling crisis, politicians remain rooted in their positions.  Many people wonder if we’ve become partisan to a fault, with both sides refusing to contemplate compromise. We’ll look at how we got here and whether we’ve run out of solutions.

GUESTS:

NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers joins Morning Edition host Rick Ganley to talk about the state's $76 million surplus and what it means for Governor Maggie Hassan politically.  Rogers also touches on the government shutdown and the reactions among members of New Hampshire's Congressional delegation.

Many of the furloughed Portsmouth Naval Shipyard workers soon will be back on the job.

A shipyard spokesman told the Portsmouth Herald that workers who are part of the Naval Sea System Command, the Naval Facilities Engineering Command and base support are heading back to work Monday morning. Other workers are being told to contact their supervisors to see if they'll be working.

mailemae59 / Flickr Creative Commons

As another debt ceiling deadline looms, on top of a government shutdown, we’ll look at what our nation’s defining document, particularly the fourteenth amendment, says about federal debt, as well as the roles of Congress and the President. 

GUESTS:

19 Furloughed From U.S. Attorney's Office In Concord

Oct 2, 2013
Betsy Divine via Flickr Creative Commons

New Hampshire's top federal prosecutor says he has furloughed 19 of his 43 staff members as a result of the government shutdown.

U.S. Attorney John Kacavas said Tuesday that the furloughs are without pay and may remain that way under terms of the sequestration budget blocked largely by Republicans.

Kacavas says he plans to rotate staff members on and off furloughs to "spread the pain."

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

The government shut-down hit home for more than 1,700 civilian employees at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, and that could deal a serious blow to the economy of the seacoast region.

The scene outside of the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard Tuesday painted a picture of what thousands of furloughed federal workers looks like you’ll see a long steady stream of cars leaving the base, but just a trickle headed the other way.

That’s because while most at the shipyard were told to report to work, many were pulled one-by-one into the office of their supervisors and handed a letter.

Walsh TD via Flickr Creative Commons

If the federal government shuts down at midnight it will affect the White Mountain National Forest at a time when many tourists are headed there for fall foliage.

The White Mountain National Forest covers about 800,000 acres and normally has about 120 full or part-time employees, says Tom Wagner, the forest supervisor.

If the federal government shuts down more than 100 of them will be off work.

“Sixteen of those employees between our law enforcement and our line officers at each office will continue to work if this is an extended shutdown," Wagner said.