hacking

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A New Hampshire software developer is working on a way to protect household devices that are connected to the internet, the latest in a broader, nationwide push to keep the devices in our homes safe from hackers.

David Brooks, who writes the Granite Geek column at the Concord Monitor, has been keeping a close eye on this topic—and he’s pretty worried. Brooks spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello.

This is all about the Internet of Things (IoT), so bring us up to speed: What is that?

Airman 1st Class Greg Nash

Technology is developing more quickly than the security to protect it, leaving the personal information of millions at risk. Your health records, schedule, shopping habits, and more are  vulnerable to potential hackers. As the "Internet of things" grows, and more companies collect information on their customers, called big data, how can you protect yourself?


Senator Jeanne Shaheen says she is still undecided over a confirmation vote for Rex Tillerson, President-elect Donald Trump’s nominee for Secretary of State.

Shaheen, a second-term Democrat, met earlier this week with the former ExxonMobil CEO, calling her conversation with Tillerson broad. Speaking in Rochester Friday, the Democrat again raised concerns about Tillerson’s business dealings with Russia.

CyberHades / Flicker/CC

A recent breach at insurance giant Anthem compromised the personal information of as many as eighty million Americans including more than six hundred thousand granite-staters. It was just the latest hacking attack of a major company, following Home Depot and Target. We’ll look at why this keeps happening and what protections show promise.

Guests:

Mark Stevens via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/oWwRHM

According to a report from the National Park Service only 7% of annual park visitors are African American. On today’s show, we delve into environmental history and cultural studies to find out why the story of the American outdoors is so white.

Then, environmentalists have taken many tacks to get people to be “greener”: the doomsday approach, education, shame. Now new research suggests another way to increase green behaviors: a salary. Why paying people an hourly wage decreases environmentally-friendly behaviors.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

(Photo by Eleventh Earl of Mar via Flickr)

A branch of the military is taking a new tack in intelligence gathering…video games. The US Navy has contracted a private firm to buy up used gaming consoles  - mostly in foreign markets  to extract sensitive data on gamers. Jacob Aron wrote about the new strategy for New Scientist.