Health

  A company that offers health insurance plans in New Hampshire under the Affordable Care Act is suing the federal government over a part of the health care law. 

Billy Brown / Flickr

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found more than half of families eligible for a federal nutrition program are not enrolled. 

Shawn Carpenter via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/89a25N

Concepts of gender are shifting in workplaces, schools and public bathrooms across America. But how about on the track, or court or pool where athletes compete as male or female?  Today, how new Olympics guidelines define gender, and a fair fight.

And later in the show, an upset among the dignified crosswords puzzles set! We'll find out why the New York Times puzzle makers are being called tone-deaf. 

2016 Kids Count Data Book, Annie E. Casey Foundation

New Hampshire remains near the top of the list in an annual ranking of kids’ well-being, but the same report shows that issues with child poverty — while less prevalent here than in other states — have grown.

In the newest edition of Kids Count, a report produced by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, New Hampshire comes in at No. 4 in the nation for overall child well-being. Much of the rankings used in the report use data from 2014.

American Dueling Grounds, Chuck Klosterman, & SpaceX

Jun 10, 2016
Nat Welch / https://flic.kr/p/dZ3KLR

Dueling was once a common part of the American experience. Today, we’ll learn more about this history and some popular dueling spots that that public can still visit today.

And what if we're wrong about everything? Pop culture critic Chuck Klosterman takes on the difficult task of predicting how our present will be viewed hundreds of years from now. We'll talk about the next great American novelist, Neil DeGrasse Tyson, and the improbable factor that kept Hamilton on the ten dollar bill.

Michael Garcia Novak / Flickr/CC

Even with all the angst about mid-life crises, and birthday cards calling you over the hill, the author says the middle years are most often about renewal. Today we're talking with former NPR correspondent Barbara Bradley Hagerty on what she discovered about middle age in America.

Casey McDermott / NHPR

All this week, NHPR is looking at how New Hampshire schools are rethinking the role they play in the lives of their students and their communities.  More students are arriving preoccupied with hunger, homelessness, and other family crises.  Teachers are on the front lines, trying to fill basic needs before the learning begins. Schools are cobbling together their own system of social services in the face of the state’s heroin crisis, the aftermath of the recession, and struggling local economies.  


Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon

Dartmouth-Hitchcock health care system has been discussing a potential affiliation deal with Elliot Health System, a smaller provider serving southern New Hampshire.

The Valley News reports D-H executive vice president Stephen LeBlanc confirmed that the discussions were underway, but he declined to say what form the affiliation might take. 

www.ratehospitals.com

An inpatient psychiatric unit in the Monadnock region will close because of staffing issues.

The move at Cheshire Medical Center/Dartmouth-Hitchcock Keene takes effect July 1. 

Hospital officials say a nationwide shortage of psychiatrists has limited their ability to treat patients - while the unit is licensed to treat 12 adult and six adolescent patients, staffing issues have meant they've only had an average of three to four adults a day. 

Wikimedia Commons

 Less than a week after New Hampshire’s first medical marijuana dispensary opened in Plymouth, another is poised to open on Thursday in Dover.

The Department of Health and Human Services has officially certified Temescal Wellness, which was selected to operate two of the state's New Hampshire’s four medical marijuana dispensaries, to start serving patients at its Dover location. The company says it plans to open its doors at noon on Thursday.

CREDIT GETTY IMAGES

  One of Boston's top hospitals is seeing an increasing number of drug abusers shoot up on its property, a tactic experts say opioid addicts hope will save them from lethal overdoses. 

Concussions: What We Know Now and How to Respond

Apr 6, 2016
David Hassler / Flickr/CC

With the NFL recently admitting that repeated blows to the head can cause degenerative brain disease, we take a time-out to scan the research on brain trauma, including innovations in reducing incidents and assessing concussions.  But is what we're learning discouraging participation in contact sports? And is rising concern over brain injury backed by science?

Sara Plourde for NHPR

The question of whether to continue New Hampshire's expanded Medicaid program has been one of the top State House policy debates this year.

But it's something local governments are mulling over as well. In City Halls across the state, officials say the program has led to some significant savings: in the slice of taxpayers’ money set aside for medical and prescription aid, and indirect savings in other areas.

NHHealthCost.org

A state website that helps people compare prices across healthcare facilities relaunched this week with an expanded library of medical procedures and new information on hospital-quality measures.

The new version of NHHealthCost.Org features 31 additional medical procedures, including physical therapy, behavioral health and chiropractic care. Cost estimates for 16 dental procedures are now available, as well as new information on the retail price of 65 brand-name and generic drugs.

CDC/ Dr. F. A. Murphy

  New Hampshire health officials have confirmed several cases of mumps at Saint Anselm College. 

Dank Depot via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/9c93J6

New Hampshire residents hoping to get access to medical marijuana are still waiting for the state’s dispensaries to open

Right now, those new facilities still have to go through a few more rounds of inspections before they can open their doors and start serving patients. Once they do open, patients will only be able to visit one dispensary at a time. And for residents in the northernmost region of the state, the nearest dispensary could be at least two hours away.

Steve Smith via Flickr CC

An initial review of whether New Hampshire insurance companies are appropriately covering substance abuse treatment shows significant differences in how often claims are denied, but experts identified problems with only a handful of cases.

The probe comes as New Hampshire seeks to expand treatment and recovery services amid a growing heroin and opioid crisis. The state insurance department began looking into the issue in November after hearing from complaints from providers and advocates, and officials presented their preliminary findings in Concord on Friday.

silvaer / Flickr/CC

After years of headlines on the ‘obesity epidemic’, the number of Americans dealing with this condition is leveling off. Awareness has increased, nutrition improved, and programs have been put in place, but it remains a stubborn problem, with research showing connections to less-recognized issues like poverty, race, and stigma.

  This program originally aired on 11/2/15.

GUESTS:

Sara Plourde for NHPR

Republican leaders in the New Hampshire House and Senate say they’re willing to consider reauthorizing the state’s Medicaid expansion after its sunset date at the end of 2016 — as long as they can find someone to help foot the costs.

On Monday’s edition of The Exchange, House Speaker Shawn Jasper said it doesn’t seem politically feasible to expect him to pass a plan that requires more public spending.

Making Sense of New Mammogram Guidelines

Dec 29, 2015
Finance & Commerce / Flickr/CC

The American Cancer Society has issued new recommendation, raising the age for screenings from forty to forty five, saying that too many false positives have led to unnecessary and even harmful treatment. Other organizations, however suggest other ages for the test.
 

This program was originally broadcast on 10/27/15.

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Checking Up on the Affordable Care Act in N.H.

Dec 15, 2015
Morgan / Flickr/CC

As another health insurance enrollment period comes to end, the conversation continues about whether or not the affordable care act is working for individuals and employers in the state. We take stock of who's getting insured, what's on the horizon for Medicaid expansion, and whether the economics of the law are bringing down costs as intended. 

 

GUESTS:   

Sharon Morrow

The manager for New Hampshire’s prescription drug monitoring program told lawmakers Tuesday that more funding would help the system to better handle an expected increase in use that could come with efforts to more closely monitor opioid prescribing.

As part of a special legislative session on heroin and opioid misuse, Gov. Maggie Hassan and Senate Majority Leader Jeb Bradley have each proposed giving the program $100,000 in state money to help with technology upgrades that would encourage more widespread use.

New Hampshire's Lead Poisoning Problem

Nov 9, 2015
Diego Torres Silvestre / Flickr/CC

While the harmful effects of lead on young children have been well-documented for decades, public health experts say the issue remains a major concern in this state and that stronger policies are needed.  We'll look at efforts to curb the impact and prevent future poisoning, and also why change has been so difficult.

Processing the Risks of Red Meat

Nov 5, 2015
cookbookman17 / Flickr/CC

Recently, the World Health Organization identified processed meat such as bacon and hot dogs as carcinogens, and cast doubt on the consumption of regular red meat as well. But champions of meat say the warnings are misleading, exaggerated, and a steak dinner can still be enjoyed. We cut deeper into the issue, exploring the pros and cons of meat for health.

GUESTS:

Attorney General Joseph Foster says New Hampshire will get about $160,000 from a multi-state settlement with a nursing home pharmacy accused of taking kickbacks from a manufacturer in return for promoting a certain drug.

Federal prosecutors announced last week that the $9.25 million settlement with Kentucky-based PharMerica Corp. resolves claims that it got kickbacks from Abbott Laboratories in exchange for recommending that physicians prescribe Depakote, made by Abbott.

The settlement partially resolves allegations in two whistleblower lawsuits.

10.05.15: Becoming Vulnerable & Born In Between

Oct 5, 2015
Dirk Vorderstraße via Flickr CC / flic.kr/p/ofCE2H

Looking to deepen your relationships, professional satisfaction, and personal innovation? Then it’s time to get vulnerable. We speak with TED Talk superstar Brene Brown, whose research says that exposing our secret selves is the most daring way to live. And, while the transgender movement gains ground, we’ll explore the shockingly common occurrence of doctors assigning gender to intersex babies. 

Anders Österberg via Flickr CC / //flic.kr/p/btG1dZ

Stretching your artistic muscles has been shown to reduce stress and increase positive thinking, but for many people, being more creative sounds like an arduous task. We’ll talk to an artist who makes a bold case for dropping the excuses, and picking up the sketchpad. Then: aphonia, flop sweat, mic fright. Call it what you will, stage fright can be crippling for some performers. On today’s show: a pianist delves into the history of performance anxiety, and her own struggle to overcome it.

A mind-altering drug called ketamine is changing the way some doctors treat depression.

Encouraged by research showing that ketamine can relieve even the worst depression in a matter of hours, these doctors are giving the drug to some of their toughest patients. And they're doing this even though ketamine lacks approval from the Food and Drug Administration for treating depression.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/redjar/113560003/in/photostream/" target="blank">redjar</a> via Flickr/Creative Commons

  Dartmouth’s Geisel School of Medicine will use a $5 million dollar federal grant for a health study on human motivation.

Officials say the grant, from the National Institutes of Health’s Common Fund, will fund an investigation into the psychological and biological factors that motivate individuals to improve their health.

Paul Townsend via Flickr CC / flic.kr/p/vyKPHC

Harvard, like other prestigious Ivy League schools, is a non-profit. Still, its 36-billion dollar endowment is bigger than the GDP of Jamaica. So why does it remain tax free? Then - meditation, sitting, mindfulness: whatever you call it, it’s springing up everywhere, from Google’s corporate offices to high school classrooms in the Bronx. But can techniques developed to help hospital patients really improve the lives of low-income students? We find out why mindfulness has a place in the classroom. Plus, music industry insiders clamor to predict and announce the summer’s most popular hit – but what about the song of the fall?  We’ll discuss the qualities that make up a classic autumnal anthem. 

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