Health

Health
1:34 pm
Wed December 11, 2013

Wide Variation In Medical Treatment For Children In Northern New England

Credit The Dartmouth Atlas

 A new study from the Dartmouth Atlas Project finds many children in northern New England receive potentially unneeded medical care that could have harmful side effects.

Researchers compared data for a range of care across Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine for children under age 18.

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Word of Mouth
11:34 am
Tue December 10, 2013

The Case For Compensating Bone Marrow Donors

Patient donating bone marrow.
Credit David Grove via flickr Creative Commons

In 1984 Congress passed the National Organ Transplant Act to address the nation’s critical organ donation shortage and improve the organ matching and placement process. The act made it illegal for anyone to give or acquire an organ for material gain. Now, almost three decades later, the act is making headlines again but this time in response to the push to rescind a ruling by the U.S. court of appeals for the ninth circuit. The court ruled that certain types of bone marrow donors could be compensated. Now the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is attempting to overturn the decision, arguing that bone-marrow is subject to the 1984 act and as such, may not be compensated.

Dr. Sally Satel is a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research and a practicing psychiatrist and lecturer at the Yale University School of Medicine; she examines mental health policy as well as political trends. She wrote the article “Why It’s Okay To Pay Bone-Marrow Donors” for Bloomberg.com.

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Word of Mouth
10:57 am
Tue December 10, 2013

The Hazards Of An Unregulated Sperm Industry

Credit Iqbal Osman via Flickr Creative Commons

In the new movie “Delivery Man,” Vince Vaughn discovers that his “donation” has been used hundreds of times without his knowledge. Far-fetched plot? Maybe not. The United States does not track sperm donations. We have no idea how many there are, how often they're donated, nor how many children are born from those donations. Rene Almeling is an assistant professor of sociology at Yale. She wrote an op-ed piece for the New York Times about “The Unregulated Sperm Industry.”

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Word of Mouth
9:55 am
Mon December 9, 2013

Inside The World Of Competitive Laughing

Credit Arnett Gill via Flickr Creative Commons

We all know laughter can be contagious. But can it be a good workout?  A form of therapy?  Even a skill?  Many happy devotees think, yes. Inspired in part by the growing popularity of laughter yoga, filmmaker and journalist Albert Nerenberg hosted the first official laughing contest in Montreal back in 2011. He’s also the director of the 2009 documentary, Laughology.

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Word of Mouth
9:34 am
Mon December 9, 2013

Bad Eating Habits Form Before You're Born

Credit Rafael Viana Araujo via Flickr Creative Commons

You may be familiar with the ordeal of introducing children to broccoli and spinach.  Two new studies suggest that finicky eaters might have picked up their discriminating habit in the womb. Forget genetics, personal responsibility, and discipline. Your taste for junk food and soda may have a lot to do with how your mother satisfied her cravings.

Kristin Wartman, is a food, politics and health journalist. She recently wrote about the new science of food choices for the New York Times.

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Word of Mouth
2:55 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

A Real-Life Tricorder? Affirmative! (Maybe.)

Star Trek's seemingly miraculous 'tricorder' is a device which can measure anything from a patient's vital signs to geological activity with the push of a button. Now, a company called Scanadu has developed a device called the 'Scout,' which they hope can be as useful for the health industry as tricorders were on the Enterprise. We talked with the company's co-founder to learn more. 

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Word of Mouth
10:18 am
Mon November 25, 2013

New Treatment May Wipe Out Hepatitis-C

Diagram of Hepatitis C.
Credit James A. Perkins via hepcni.net

Although new cases of Hepatitis-C have drastically decreased in the United States since peaking in the 1980’s, the blood-borne disease which primarily attacks and destroys the liver, kills more Americans annually than AIDS.

Andrew Pollack covers business and biotechnology for the New York Times. We read his article “Hepatitis-C, a Silent Killer, Meets Its Match,” in which Pollack describes a new series of treatments about to enter the market that could effectively do the impossible: wipe out Hep C.

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The Exchange
9:00 am
Mon November 25, 2013

Teen Drinking In New Hampshire

The Sidebar
12:10 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

The Sidebar: Obamacare: Tales From The Front Lines

If you’ve been following the rollout of the Affordable Care Act in New Hampshire, you might be struggling to keep up with the twists and turns - from legislation passed in 2012 that barred creation of a state-run marketplace, to the thousands of letters Anthem Blue Cross mailed to policyholders this month, telling them their health plans did not meet the law’s coverage standards.

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Virtual Town Hall
9:17 am
Thu November 14, 2013

Virtual Town Hall: How Affordable Will The New Health Care Law Be For N.H.?

Now that the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, has launched, just how affordable will it make health insurance in New Hampshire? We hosted a special panel featuring Laura Knoy, host of NHPR's The Exchange, along with Tiffany Eddy of the Live Free or Die Alliance for a town hall discussion broadcast live on the web on Tuesday, November 19th. 

You can listen to the unedited audio from the event right here:

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Word of Mouth
11:27 am
Mon October 21, 2013

This Is Your Brain On Caffeine

Credit kiss kiss bang bang via Flickr Creative Commons

In 1994, the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine confirmed what anybody who’s tried to give up coffee suspected: caffeine is chemically addictive. It’s also the world’s most popular psychoactive drug… 80% of American adults consume it in some form. Withdrawal symptoms from caffeine are so dreadful that they are cited as a mental disorder in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.

Here to unpack the chemical effect that caffeine can have on the human brain is Joseph Stromberg, journalist and science writer based in Washington, D.C. His work has been featured in Smithsonian Magazine and Slate.

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Health
10:06 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

Medicaid Expansion Plan Approved By Commission

New Hampshire is one of just a handful of states that hasn’t yet answered the Medicaid expansion question. Remember, when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on the federal health law last summer, it said Washington could not force states to expand their  Medicaid programs that provides health care to the poor. States, instead, must be given a choice.

And so, for the better part of three months now, a special commission has been studying whether to add 50,000 more low income individuals to the program.

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NH News
7:18 am
Tue October 8, 2013

Collaborative Surgery Center In Nashua Will Offer Cheaper Procedures

Two hospitals and a health clinic in Nashua, N.H., are teaming up to open a new outpatient surgery center.

The Surgery Center of Greater Nashua brings together St. Joseph Hospital, Southern New Hampshire Medical Center and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Nashua. Its first procedure — a knee surgery — is scheduled for Tuesday, with a ceremonial opening on Wednesday.

NH News
9:52 am
Thu October 3, 2013

Exeter Hospital Employees Treated For Scabies

Credit NHPR Staff

New Hampshire's Exeter Hospital says 33 employees are being treated for scabies after contracting it from a patient at the hospital.

About 300 more staff members are being treated as a precaution, but have not shown symptoms of scabies, a contagious skin condition caused by mites.

The hospital also said it is going to notify 165 patients about a possible exposure.

The hospital said it reported the exposure to state officials on Sept. 27.

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NH News
11:31 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Concord Hospital Names New CEO

Concord Hospital is getting a new CEO.

The hospital Board of Trustees has selected Robert Steigmeyer. He is expected to start the first week of January 2014.

Steigmeyer has been the chief executive officer at Geisinger Community Medical Center in Scranton, Pa., since 2012 and a leader of a community medical center that eventually joined it.

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