information technology

MWV Chamber of Commerce via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/DCd9Ju

Yellowstone may be the first national park, but it was New Hampshire's White Mountains that for decades prior captured the imagination of American tourists, scientists, and artists. Today, a portrait of Mount Washington's artistic history.

Plus, from Bob Dylan to Yoko Ono, audiences have long had a fascination with the off-beat or out of tune - so why do we love some bad singers and love to hate others?

Then, America's great repository of world knowledge faces an existential predicament. In a world where information is stored in servers and googled at will, can the Library of Congress really keep up?

John F. Smith

From apps for avoiding heavy traffic to the latest polling data in the presidential race  -- infographics are visual shorthand for data in the post-newspaper slash social media slash sound byte age.  Several sources credit the digital age for giving birth to infographics and others cite the publication of USA Today’s “Snapshots” beginning in 1982.  Susan Schulten begs to differ.

(Photo by Creecher94 via Flickr Creative Commons)

Tomorrow will bring a long-awaiting moment for the internet…it’s IPV6 Day, when a whole new version of the web will officially go live. But don’t worry, says our next guest, there should be no change in the way most of us use the internet…as long as everything goes as planned. Here to explain IPV6 and a few other tech stories bubbling up is Rob Fleischman. He’s a web developer and entrepreneur, CTO of Xerocole, and Word of Mouth’s explainer of all things wired. 

 

Rob explains some challenges for developers when IPV6 goes live:

“Open-Data City” is a term often batted around in open source and techie circles … The concept goes something like this – when civic data, from traffic statistics to school performance, is made free to the public that data can change our communal conversations, policies, lives and technologies… It’s an attractive idea that we hoped to pin down… Which data?  Where is it now?  How do we access it? No better person to ask than Greg Hadfield.