kristinmarshall via Flickr Creative Commons

At any given moment invisible information is traveling all around you. There are two obvious examples: radio waves…or if you’re listening online, the wireless signal emitted by your router. Researchers at MIT have been experimenting with these signals and they’ve developed a type of radar that uses Wi-Fi signal that can be seen – and used to detect movement and even see through walls. Dina Katabi, is a professor of electrical engineering and computer science at MIT, and she spoke with us about her new project, what she’s calling “Wi-Vi.”

sarahelizamoody via Flickr Creative Commons

Our sunniest content of the week, all in one smart and snazzy hour. This week, misogyny online, the return of legal internet poker, an app that proves you're on a public beach, surprising summer reads, and a photographer's documentation of vanishing highway rest stops.

Mr. L via flickr Creative Commons

More than two years have passed since the Department of Justice seized and shut down three major American online-gambling websites, charged site executives with bank fraud, and froze millions of dollars in player funds. Since then, social gaming from Zynga and the like has been thriving on social media sites, attracting millions of players to their digital tables, using only fake money. At the same time, real money gambling is also back on the internet - on April 30th, Station Casinos in Nevada became the first site to offer real online poker since the 2011 shutdown.  The questions are: will the for-profit sites draw millions of social players and will they put real money on the line?  Michael Kaplan is a contributing editor for Cigar Aficionado and has been covering the return of online gambling.

Richard Holt® via flickr Creative Commons

Privacy is a topic we’ve visited and revisited on this program, especially when it comes to the web community’s reaction to shifting policies on our social media and email accounts. Revelations made by former CIA and Booz Allen employee Edward Snowden about the National Security Agency’s sweeping electronic surveillance program could forever change the “privacy conversation.” Joining us with more on the internet’s reaction to the unfolding NSA story is Brady Carlson, our always-vigilant eye on social media and the world of the web.

AlexanderVorobiov via 500px Creative Commons license

A new study from the University of Chicago shows that couples who meet via online dating sites tend to have better relationships than couples who meet for the first time in person. Here to tell us more about these findings is Ingrid Wickelgren, editor with Scientific American MIND.  She wrote the article, “Does Finding Your Spouse Online Lead to a Stronger Marriage?”

Rebecca Lavoie

Earlier this week, Yahoo!'s board of directors approved the tech company’s one point one billion dollar purchase of the micro-blogging site Tumblr, the latest move in CEO Marissa Mayer’s bid to revive the flagging tech company. The purchase has some Tumblr users up in arms, and others simply shrugging their shoulders at what just seems like the latest acquisition in the wake of so many to come before it.

Joining us to explain a bit more what the purchase of Tumblr means for Yahoo! and fans of the site is Lance Ulanoff, Editor in Chief at Mashable.

jieq via flickr Creative Commons

A government lab announced earlier this month that it’s been operating a quantum internet at Los Alamos for the past two years. Which led us to wonder, um, WHAT IS A QUANTUM INTERNET???  Joining us to explain it is Rob Fleischman, Chief Technology Officer at Xero-Cole, and the guy we call to help us understand things like, you know, quantum technology.

Jan Hruby via Flickr

“Internet Addiction Disorder” is a disputed diagnosis in academic and mental health circles, but just try going a day without your daily habit of checking email, the news, weather, sports, recipes, and Facebook, and you may find yourself jonesing for access.

hahatango via Flickr Creative Commons

From anticipated weather events to shocking acts of terrorism, many people now turn first to social media to react and interact during moments of crisis – this past Monday was no different.  Shortly after two explosions rocked Copley Square near the Boston Marathon’s finish line, the internet was flooded with graphic photos, video uploads from witnesses, and tools to help loved ones connect with runners and spectators at the race.  With the online element of disaster response now an essential part of how we view these events, we wanted to break down what worked and what didn’t.  Joining us is Brady Carlson, NHPR’s host of All Things Considered, and our in-house expert on all things internet.

Leo Reynods via Flickr Creative Commons

Our niftiest and spiffiest content, all in one great show. This week, a look at the shifting human condition. Holocaust survivors being turned into holograms, a Russian "Swiss Family Robinson" that missed most of the 20th Century, corporate anthropologists, transplant "tourism," the nasty effect of internet comments, and a former professor pens a memoir about being stalked by an ex- student online.

Marco Mayer via flickr Creative Commons

The internet is a technological forum for public conversation, debate and cross-cultural interaction and their very opposites. Reader comments often take on characteristics more like the roman forum…it’s in the comments section where sniping, shaming and mean-spirited insults are pelted like rotten tomatoes onto a stage. A study published in the journal of computer-mediated communication measured the influence of reader comments on the articles they describe.   Dietram Scheufele, John E. Ross Professor in Science Communication at the University of Wisconsin, Madison discusses reader comments and their influence on the articles they cling to. He recently co-authored an article on the subject for the New York Times with Dominique Brossaard, "This Story Stinks"; the comments section for the article closed with 400 comments.

jacobfg via Flickr Creative Commons

On February 25th, the Center for Copyright Information, in cooperation with America's five largest internet service providers, launched a new "six-strike" alert system they hope will change illegal downloading for good.

Leo Reynolds via Flickr Creative Commons

Word of Mouth's weekly program. This week's show features an art blog that uses Google Earth images to show the battlefields of drones, a radio show produced in an an insane asylum, Ty Burr's "Gods Like Us," and history's badass-iest nuns. Plus, webcast funerals!

Part 1:

stanescoo via Flickr Creative Commons

The 1995 film “Hackers”, a young Angelina Jolie and baby-faced Johnny Lee Miller star as digital rebels dressed in a punk aesthetic with the power to takeover anything that dares to exist on the internet.  Nearly two decades later, it’s clear that that hackers can’t be identified by dress, ethnicity, or any other one specific trait, but evidence of their presence and power in our increasingly digital world is everywhere. 

wiccked via Flickr Creative Commons

 Jonathan Harris is working to make the internet, or at least his corner of it, a more human experience by giving regular people the tools to become storytellers. As creator of Cowbird, he has built an online haven for vulnerable human thoughts, ideas, emotions, and stories.

Word of Mouth's favorite explainer of all things wired Rob Fleischman discusses our beloved internet devices and the emerging technologies that may be gearing up to take their spot.

Sebastian Hillig via Flickr Creative Commons

Every Google search, every saved photograph, streamed song, text message and each stroke of the e-mail send button is served and stored on a digital infrastructure that is – to the end user – invisible.  The New York Times has spent a year investigating the tens of thousands of data centers that support the information industry, and discovered a secretive, power-sucking infrastructure sharply at odds with its sleek, e via Flickr Creative Commons

It’s been only been a year since Apple revealed the iPhone 4s to the world:  it looked a lot like its predecessors, but included one game changing new feature: voice assistance technology.  A short time later, we had Apple guru and explainer-of-all-things-wired Rob Fleischman on the show.  Well, it’s one year later and Rob is back to talk about the iPhone 5,

Eszter via Flickr Creative Commons

The popular website glassdoor has thousands of people posting their salaries, reviews of their companies, and other juicy corporate tidbits online for all to see. Does this mark the end of salary secrecy? And what do companies think about it?

(Photo by moonlightbulb via Flickr Creative Commons)

Here's What's Awesome:

Facebook's big, mean email switcheroo...

The Oatmeal v. A Lawyer...

Clay Shirky's take on the lack of innovation this election cycle...

Photo Credit Colinaut, Via Flickr Creative Commons

Here's What's Awesome...

EHarmony and LinkedIn passwords hacked

Facebook's attempt at democracy...

So, how'd it go?

Jun 7, 2012

Earlier this week, we talked to our go-to internet guy about a switch to be flipped on a whole new version of the internet. Yesterday was World IPV6 Day, and as tech decoder Rob Fleischman explained, converting to the new web protocol was designed to solve the impending problem of the internet running out of IP addresses…those are the numerical codes designating the addresses of websites, pages, computers and hardware on networks. Well, Wednesday passed…the conversion happened…and our computers are still working.

(Photo by Creecher94 via Flickr Creative Commons)

Tomorrow will bring a long-awaiting moment for the internet…it’s IPV6 Day, when a whole new version of the web will officially go live. But don’t worry, says our next guest, there should be no change in the way most of us use the internet…as long as everything goes as planned. Here to explain IPV6 and a few other tech stories bubbling up is Rob Fleischman. He’s a web developer and entrepreneur, CTO of Xerocole, and Word of Mouth’s explainer of all things wired. 


Rob explains some challenges for developers when IPV6 goes live:

Here's What's Awesome...

Plagiarism doesn't work.

Science suggests consuming organic food has an effect on our morals.

What's Internet Explorer? Chrome becomes number one browser!

Produced by Jonathan Lynch

In the 1980s classic comedy revenge of the nerds, there was a clear cut boundary between the titular nerds and the preppy, popular frat boys that sought to humiliate them. A recent culture trend in Silicon Valley is looking to completely upend that convention by fusing the two. A new breed of software engineers is on the horizon, and they are just as likely to fine tune code as they are to lift weights and party on the weekend.

Raw Story Executive Editor Megan Carpentier joins us to discuss the ever retrievable well of internet content and provides some helpful hints for would-be web writers, based on the lessons of a few who took some pretty wrong turns.    


(Photo by moonlightbulb via Flickr Creative Commons)

Here's What's Awesome...

Defending "awesome."  Seriously..."awesome" is, well, awesome.

Facebook: a new place for organ donors to connect to those who need them? Or another way for Zuck to mine our personal (and internal!) data???

How French tweeters used WWII code to get around election law.

April is Autism Awareness Month, and we thought it would be a good time to talk about a multimedia project in which people with autism are sharing their stories and perspectives.

It’s called the Loud Hands Project  - and it’s being spearheaded by our guest, Julia Bascom. She also writes about autism and people with disabilities on the blog Just Stimming. She talks with All Things Considered host Brady Carlson about the project.

Before Facebook and MySpace transformed how we interact virtually, there was another kind of Internet — a 1980s network, where users connected via phone lines and communicated through simple lines of text.

And while that may sound outdated, that version of the Internet is still very much alive.

'A Lot More Elegant'

Pat McNameeking, a college student in Concord, N.H., is one champion of this throwback social network known as SDF, or Super Dimensional Fortress.