Jeanne Shaheen

File photos / NHPR

Both of New Hampshire’s US Senators voted in favor of giving President Obama additional trade powers.

The Senate voted 62 to 37 Friday to approve so-called “fast track” negotiating authority, in which Congress can ratify or reject, but not change, trade agreements presented by the president.

www.shaheen.senate.gov

 

The U.S. Senate has passed legislation that makes sure death benefits paid to families of public safety officer who are killed in the line of duty are not subject to federal income tax.

U.S. Sens. Kelly Ayotte and Jeanne Shaheen introduced the bill and say it's now headed to the president for his signature.

Federal survivor benefits are not subject to federal taxation but Ayotte's office says New Hampshire law enforcement personnel were concerned about an ambiguity in the law regarding the tax treatment of state-based survivor benefits programs.

Chris Jensen / NHPR

New Hampshire Sen. Jeanne Shaheen has introduced a bill she says would reduce operating costs for places like hospitals, universities and manufacturing plants by helping them make efficient use of energy that would otherwise be wasted.  

Shaheen says the bill addresses regulatory barriers that hamper the use of heat recovery technologies known as combined heat and power and waste heat to power.  

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

President Barack Obama has signed a scaled back version of an energy efficiency bill co-authored by New Hampshire Democratic Senator Jeanne Shaheen.

The bill, co-sponsored by New Hampshire Republican Senator Kelly Ayotte, aims to cut energy use in commercial buildings, manufacturing plants and homes. It includes the Better Buildings Act, which Ayotte first introduced in 2013.

The measure was popular with both parties. But it was defeated last year after becoming enmeshed in a partisan fight over the Keystone XL oil pipeline.

File photos / NHPR

New Hampshire's U.S. senators have voted to confirm Loretta Lynch as attorney general.

Lynch was confirmed Thursday by a vote of 56-43.

Every Democrat in the Senate voted to confirm, including Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, who called the appointment of a black woman to the nation's top law enforcement job a historic achievement. Shaheen said Lynch has "sterling credentials" and a commitment to public service.

Sen. Kelly Ayotte joined nine other Republicans to support Lynch, calling her clearly qualified.

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New Hampshire U.S.  Senator Jeanne Shaheen is leading an effort to put a woman on the $20 bill.

Shaheen introduced legislation earlier this week to convene a panel of citizens to recommend a woman whose likeness would be featured on a new $20 bill.

Shaheen says her proposal complements the Women on 20s campaign, which hopes to make the change by the year 2020.

That marks the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment, giving women the right to vote.

Rebecca Lavoie, NHPR

NHPR's Morning Edition is checking in occasionally with New Hampshire’s Congressional delegation.

Tuesday morning, host Rick Ganley spoke with with Democratic U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen.

UPDATE: Sen. Shaheen will hold a town hall meeting Thursday night in Colebrook at 5:30 at the Tillotson Center for the Arts.

The Senate recently passed its budget, but you’ve raised some concerns with the plan. How confident are you that House and Senate lawmakers can now come together and agree on a budget?

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

Sen. Kelly Ayotte of New Hampshire said Monday that despite recent negotiation setbacks, she has no regrets in joining 46 other Republican Senators earlier this month in signing a letter addressed to Iran.

The letter warned Iranian leaders that any nuclear deal signed with President Obama would not last past his second term if Congress was not allowed to weigh in.

The Senators have received flak from colleagues across the aisle, arguing that the letter only stalled negotiations further putting the country at risk.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

U.S. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen was in the Granite State Friday making several stops in Manchester including to meet with law enforcement and statewide agencies to advocate for her new legislation on human trafficking.

If passed the Senator’s bill would funnel more funding into treatment programs as well as cleanse a victim’s record of offenses such as prostitution or drug smuggling that occurred while being trafficked.

File photos / NHPR

Update: The Republican-led House has rejected a short-term funding bill for the Department of Homeland Security, increasing the likelihood of partial shutdown of U.S. anti-terror operations at midnight.

In a statement, Sen. Jeanne Shaheen urged House Speaker John Boehner to call a vote on a Senate bill that passed earlier today. "We cannot afford the consequences of an agency shutdown,” Shaheen said.

Kris Klop / Flickr/CC

  New Hampshire's U.S. senators are supportive of President Barack Obama's decision to pursue a congressionally approved authorization for the use of military force against Islamic state fighters.   Republican Sen. Kelly Ayotte says as the Senate begins hearings on the language and scope of Obama's request, she wants to learn more about whether he is prepared to fully execute an effective strategy to defeat ISIS under the terms of the authorization.  Democratic Sen.

flickr

Reactions to President Obama’s State of the Union address predictably fell along party lines among New Hampshire’s Congressional delegation.

Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen says she’s encouraged by the proposals outlined by the president in Tuesday night’s speech.

“Whether it’s efforts to make higher education more affordable for young people, reforming our tax code, or investing in alternative energy sources to lower costs to create jobs, Congress should now renew our  commitment to growing our economy and helping small businesses succeed,” Shaheen said in a statement.

www.shaheen.senate.gov

New Hampshire U.S. Senator Kelly Ayotte says Secretary of Defense nominee Ashton Carter has a strong resume, but says she’s not yet ready to pledge her support.

During a stop in Nashua Friday, Ayotte, a Republican member of the Armed Services Committee, says it’s important to get through the nomination hearing process before making that decision.

“One of the things I will want to ask him a number of questions about is the administration’s foreign policy, and what his views are for a strategy for the challenges we face, whether it’s ISIS, whether it’s Russian aggression.”

NHPR Staff

U.S. Sen. Kelly Ayotte is praising outgoing Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel while criticizing President Barack Obama.

Ayotte, a Republican who serves on the Senate Armed Services Committee, opposed Hagel's confirmation in 2012 but said Monday he should be honored for his service to the country.

She also said the "national security failings" of the Obama administration rest with the president, not Hagel.

Her colleague on the committee, Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, said she has the utmost respect for Hagel, who resigned Monday.

Courtesy Shaheen.Senate.gov

New Hampshire’s two U.S. Senators are split on President Obama’s executive order on immigration preventing nearly five million people in the country illegally from being deported.

During a visit to Portsmouth Friday, Democratic Senator Jeanne Shaheen said there’s legal precedent for the president’s action.

But Shaheen said there’s more to work to be done.

“I think Congress needs to act. That’s the way to address this issue and to get it done in a way that addresses our border security and addresses our visa system – all of the aspects of immigration.”

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

A Republican wave may have swept across the country Tuesday night, but the red tide hit a granite breakwater in New Hampshire. Democrats here held three of four seats at the top of the ticket. Strategists are looking closely at what made the difference for Democrats here, and for lessons that can be taken forward.   

This election ran against former House Speaker Tip O’Neill’s dictum that “all politics is local”. In this case deep dissatisfaction with President Obama powered the GOP to gains in Congress and the retaking of the Senate majority.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The polls had predicted this race would be tight, and for a time last night, even after media outlets had declared Jeanne Shaheen the winner, Scott Brown briefly held a slim lead. But by nights end, it was Shaheen and her backers savoring a win in a contest party leaders here and in Washington wanted dearly.

“Tonight, tonight, the people of NH chose to put NH first.” 

If you are seeking nuance or restraint, you wont find it at a  get out the vote rally on the Sunday before a tight election.  

Here’s State GOP chairman Jennifer Horn last night in Manchester:

"This is our time. We need to crush it. We need to grab it.  We need to run with it, push their heads under over and over again until they cannot breathe anymore, until the elections are over Tuesday night."   

Sara Plourde

Spending on the New Hampshire Senate race cracked the $46 million mark this week to become the most expensive election campaign in Granite State history.

And to the surprise of no one, outside groups have far outspent the candidates: party organizations, political action committees, super PACS and other non-candidate groups have poured $28.7 million into the race, one of a handful of closely watched contests that will determine which party controls the U.S. Senate.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The candidates split on key issues from the start. Asked to identify the greatest threat facing America, Scott brown was unequivocal:  radical Islamic Jihadists.

"It's something that’s real, that’s serious. Obviously we have Boko Haram in Africa, we have ISIS and Al- Qaeda elements, still, and their number one goal is to disrupt and dismantle the society as we know it.  Senator Shaheen has called what we are discussing fear-mongering. I call it a very rational fear."

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Republican Scott Brown and Democrat Jeanne Shaheen hit familiar themes on the US senate campaign trail today.

Brown  campaigned alongside former Governor John Sununu in Seabrook, while Shaheen stumped at a Manchester tech company.

Scott Brown’s visit to the Seabrook station nuclear plant was off-limits to reporters, but according to his campaign, Brown wanted to underscore the role nuclear power needs to play in US energy policy and Shaheen’s past criticism of Seabrook.

Shaheen, meanwhile, visited the Dyn corporation

Fred Bever for NHPR

Former GOP Presidential nominee John McCain was back in New Hampshire today, stumping for the Republican ticket.

In an appearance at the American Legion Hall, the Arizona Senator nodded in agreement as Republican senate candidate Scott Brown asserted that Shaheen should have joined in a letter that called on President Obama to leave a residual force in Iraq. The American people have been failed by the administration’s foreign policy, Brown says. 

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Democrat Jeanne Shaheen was joined on the campaign trail this weekend by one of her party’s biggest stars: Elizabeth Warren, the Massachusetts Senator who defeated Scott Brown in 2012. While Shaheen’s campaign stops targeted core Democratic constituencies – college towns and union halls --  Scott Brown’s campaign sought votes a bit farther afield.

Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren made one thing clear to the crowd at the University of New Hampshire.  Scott Brown is not from here.

cnn.com

In their second televised debate, U.S. Senate candidates Democrat Jeanne Shaheen and Republican Scott Brown clashed on how to best handle the threat of ISIS.

Brown repeatedly tried to link Shaheen to President Obama, including on the fight against the Islamic State.

“Senator, with respect, the Kurds are hanging on for dear life, they’re in trouble. The Iraqi government is in trouble. ISIS is the size of New England right now, and you and the president have taken ground troops off the table, which is the worst thing you can do.”

NHPR Staff

The dynamic of this high-profile race has changed little since former Massachusetts Senator Scott Brown began plotting a return to Washington, from New Hampshire, the state in which he spent his early childhood.

Last night's NECN/Concord Monitor/UNH debate at the Capital Center for the Arts in Concord was true to form.

Jeanne Shaheen repeatedly cast Brown as an opportunist:

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/barackobamadotcom/">BarackObamaDotCom</a> / Flickr

Former President Bill Clinton tried to light a fire under New Hampshire Democrats at the party’s annual Jefferson-Jackson dinner in Manchester last night.

He warned that without a more energetic voter turnout effort, Democrats could take a big hit, as they did in 2010.

As Election Day draws near we’re checking in each week on political ads and ad spending with Dave Levinthal, Senior Political Reporter for the Center for Public Integrity.

Over the past week Levinthal says political ads have turned negative – really negative.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

There’s a painted blue line surrounding the entrance to the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard. Over that blue line, political campaigning is not allowed, but just a few inches on this side of it – politics are in motion.

Over the last few months, Shipyard unions have endorsed at least five candidates, most of them Democrats. 

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

  Environmental issues have never ranked high on the list of issues that drive most voters to the polls. But this year, Tom Steyer – a former hedge fund manager and billionaire – has pledged to spend $50 million dollars in a few key races around the country, hoping to make climate change a central issue. This spending begs a question: can talking about global warming actually win elections?

Steyer’s operation in New Hampshire, NextGen Climate, has 24 full-time staff, and 5 field offices with two more slated to open in the coming weeks.

Here’s a statement about campaign advertising that may surprise you even if you’ve seen the influx of ads on TV and online video sites: “Candidates, parties and groups ran at least 10,300 TV ads in the New Hampshire U.S. Senate race.”

That statement comes from a project called “Who’s Buying the Senate?”

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