Jeanne Shaheen

Emily Corwin / NHPR

There’s a painted blue line surrounding the entrance to the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard. Over that blue line, political campaigning is not allowed, but just a few inches on this side of it – politics are in motion.

Over the last few months, Shipyard unions have endorsed at least five candidates, most of them Democrats. 

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

  Environmental issues have never ranked high on the list of issues that drive most voters to the polls. But this year, Tom Steyer – a former hedge fund manager and billionaire – has pledged to spend $50 million dollars in a few key races around the country, hoping to make climate change a central issue. This spending begs a question: can talking about global warming actually win elections?

Steyer’s operation in New Hampshire, NextGen Climate, has 24 full-time staff, and 5 field offices with two more slated to open in the coming weeks.

Here’s a statement about campaign advertising that may surprise you even if you’ve seen the influx of ads on TV and online video sites: “Candidates, parties and groups ran at least 10,300 TV ads in the New Hampshire U.S. Senate race.”

That statement comes from a project called “Who’s Buying the Senate?”

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Scott Brown has tried to make the New Hampshire Senate race about national security, illegal immigration and incumbent Jeanne Shaheen’s political fidelity to an unpopular president.

But the Republican candidate has spent a lot of time the past two weeks defending his somewhat ambiguous record on abortion rights. The issue boiled over Tuesday at a hastily organized “media availability” in Derry, where Brown was set to talk foreign policy with Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla).

via YouTube

The US Senate campaigns of Jeanne Shaheen and Scott Brown continue to battle over Brown’s record on abortion.

A day after Jeanne Shaheen’s campaign aired an ad highlighting a Scott Brown’s sponsorship of  2005 bill in the Massachusetts legislature that sought to imposed a 24-waiting period for abortion and require women to be provided with images of fetus, the Brown campaign was up with an ad of his own.

It features Brown speaking right into the camera.

NHPR / Michael Brindley

Florida U.S. Senator Marco Rubio was in New Hampshire Tuesday to endorse Republican Scott Brown in the race for U.S. Senate.

Speaking with Brown at an event in Derry that focused on foreign policy, Rubio says re-electing Democrat Jeanne Shaheen would be disastrous.

“Your current United State Senator, if she’s reelected, God forbid, the first vote she will take is to re-elect Harry Reid as the majority leader, someone who uses the United States Senate as a platform to run interference for the failed foreign policy of this president.”

NHPR / Michael Brindley

Republican Scott Brown called on opponent Democrat Jeanne Shaheen to pull an ad he says misrepresents the so-called Women’s Right to Know bill he co-sponsored as a Massachusetts state senator.

The ad was controversial from the moment it began running.

For the Shaheen campaign, this ad is the sharpest effort yet in the race for U.S. Senate to undercut Scott Brown’s record on abortion rights.

Substance, Sparks in First Shaheen-Brown Debate

Oct 6, 2014

Senator Jeanne Shaheen and her Republican challenger, Scott Brown, debated for the first time yesterday in North Conway.

But both candidates focused more on spelling out big differences on policy than they did on rehashing the pointed attack lines promoted by their respective campaigns.

The charged sloganeering wasn't entirely absent. In his opening statement, Brown delivered his campaign’s fundamental argument: That Shaheen votes with President Obama and his polices 99 percent of the time.

Brown, Shaheen Spar In First Debate

Oct 6, 2014
Boverman/Jensen for NHPR

Democratic Senator Jeanne Shaheen and GOP challenger Scott Brown sparred over reproductive rights Monday in a debate held at North Conway’s Grand Hotel.

Shaheen used this debate to emphasized her record supporting access to abortion and contraception, and to question Brown’s claim that he is pro-choice.

NHPR Staff

  U.S. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen and her Republican challenger Scott Brown are meeting for the first of several debates ahead of the November elections.

Monday's debate in North Conway is being hosted by the Mount Washington Valley Economic Council, which represents a dozen towns and works to attract new businesses to the area.

Shaheen, a former governor, is seeking a second term in the Senate. Brown won a special election in 2010 in Massachusetts, lost the seat two years later and moved to New Hampshire in late 2013.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Laura Knoy sat down with U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen for an in-depth discussion about the issues on New Hampshire voters’ minds this election season.

More information about NHPR's special election series presented with UNH Law School can be found here.

GUEST:

  • Jeanne Shaheen - U.S. Senator for New Hampshire. Previously, she also served as Governor of New Hampshire.

Watch the interview:

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Democratic incumbent U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen says U.S. air strikes against ISIS in Syria were a necessary step toward defeating the terrorist group.

Senator Shaheen acknowledged the quandary of working with a Syrian government that just a year ago was forced to hand over chemical weapons it allegedly used on its own people.

But in an interview Tuesday night with NHPR’s Laura Knoy at the UNH School of Law, Shaheen, a member of the foreign relations committee, said there were no other options.

Boverman/Jensen for NHPR

Democratic Senator Jeanne Shaheen is making a big push for the women’s vote, which for three decades has tilted toward her party. But this year, GOP challenger Scott Brown is trying to exploit what may be a new vulnerability for Democratic candidates – women’s disenchantment with the way President Obama is handling the threat of the so-called Islamic State.

The race could come down to what’s highest on women’s minds come election day  – social and economic issues such as abortion and pay equity, or… national security.

Sara Plourde / NHPR

NHPR and UNH School of Law present

Jeanne Shaheen
Democratic candidate for US Senate

September 30th at 5:30pm
Reception to follow

UNH School of Law, 2 White Street, Concord, NH

Join Laura Knoy for an in-depth discussion with the candidates about the issues on New Hampshire voters’ minds this election season. Each forum will be broadcast the following day during The Exchange at 9 am on the stations of NHPR.

Chris Jensen for NHPR

Jeanne Shaheen kicked off her week of women’s themed events by collecting the endorsement of NARAL-Pro-Choice America PAC, and by telling reporters to take Scott Brown’s claims of having a pro-choice record with a grain of salt.

“He can try and say all he wants to that he has been pro-choice. The fact is that’s not the way he vote when he was in Massachusetts – check his record – and that’s not the way he has voted in Washington.”

NHPR / Michael Brindley

On the campaign trail Monday, Republican U.S. Senate candidate Scott Brown continued to rail against the Affordable Care Act, taking aim specifically at the employer mandate.

During an event at North Country Tractor in Pembroke, Brown highlighted a part of the health law yet to kick in: a requirement that businesses with 50 or more full-time employees offer health insurance benefits.

The store’s owner says that’s why he’s stopped hiring at 47 employees.

Brown says it’s an example of how so-called Obamacare is hurting New Hampshire businesses.

Sam Evans-Brown

New Hampshire's gubernatorial and U.S. Senate candidates are addressing energy industry leaders, consumers and policy makers at an annual summit in Concord.

The New Hampshire Energy Summit being held Monday is organized by the Dupont Group and the New Hampshire Independent Energy Council, a coalition of non-utility electric generators, renewable generation developers, private transmission companies and electricity suppliers.

Gov. Maggie Hassan and her Republican challenger both will speak, as will U.S. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen and Republican Scott Brown.

Chris Jensen / NHPR

Senator Jeanne Shaheen says she may have missed some meetings of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee but she is working against terrorism...

According to an article in the Boston Herald during this Congressional session Shaheen has missed 11 of the 30 meetings at which the committee published a report.

But Shaheen says it is wrong to conclude that she has been derelict and isn’t engaged in efforts to combat threats such as ISIS.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

No later than 11 a.m. this morning, Senator Jeanne Shaheen celebrated the four-year anniversary of the Senate's Small Business Jobs and Credit Act with a few sips of Smutty.

Smuttynose’s new brewery in Hampton was financed in part with loans from the Small Business Jobs and Credit Act. That bill, which became law in 2010, created a $30 billion lending program through the U.S. Treasury.

Shaheen hoped to shine a spotlight on that bill today because she and her opponent, former Massachusetts Senator, Scott Brown both voted on it.

Josh Rogers

Republican senate candidate Scott Brown was riding high yesterday. His campaign was lifted by some positive poll numbers, and by a visit from a one of his party's brightest lights, NJ Governor  Chris Christie. Democrats fought back with some lower-profile visitors,  ones from Brown’s former home-state of Massachusetts. 

If you believe the rhetoric coming from the camps of  Jeanne Shaheen and Scott Brown, you might call this race the Carpetbagger vs. the Obamabot.

For months, Republican Senate candidate Scott Brown’s relationship with “big oil” has been the key that opened the wallets of donors to Sen. Jeanne Shaheen’s re-election campaign.

Now, with a recent poll showing Brown within striking distance of the incumbent, Shaheen is taking the message to the airwaves.

Josh Rogers

Senator Jeanne Shaheen’s campaign is trying to paint a company that paid her opponent Scott Brown $270,000 dollars as a “serial outsourcer.”

Brown has been on the board of directors of Kadant Incorporated, which supplies equipment for the pulp and paper industry, since February of 2013. The company’s annual report, which Brown signed off on, says it plans to grow in the US market by “using low cost manufacturing bases, such as China and Mexico.”

When discussing competitive U.S. Senate races, New Hampshire isn't at the top of the list. Alaska, Arkansas, Louisiana — they all have tight contests. But now it seems even New Hampshire may be in play.

Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen is a former longtime New Hampshire governor, finishing up her first term in the U.S. Senate. Polls consistently find she's still personally popular, even after millions of dollars in attack ads run against her. And yet a recent WMUR Granite State poll finds she has a race on her hands.

NHPR Staff

A new poll shows U.S. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen and possible Republican challenger Scott Brown in a close race for the New Hampshire Senate seat.

The WMUR Granite State Poll shows, Shaheen, a Democrat, ahead of Republicans Bob Smith and Jim Rubens.

The poll says Shaheen has led Brown throughout the spring and summer, but her campaign is being weighed down by national politics, particularly the declining popularity of President Obama. The poll says only 37 percent of likely voters approve of the job Obama is doing as president.

NHPR / Michael Brindley

Arizona Senator John McCain was back on the New Hampshire campaign trail Monday.

He was here to boost the campaign of former Massachusetts Senator Scott Brown.

John McCain won the New Hampshire primary twice, and seemed to understand that a crowd of Granite State voters – even one of full supporters – likes a little deference.

“I will leave it up to the good judgment of the people of New Hampshire. I certainly wouldn’t pretend to tell them how to vote, but I would like to share with them as I have today the experience I had with this good and decent American.”

Amanda Loder / NHPR

New Hampshire’s U.S. Senators say they support actions being taken in northern Iraq to combat Sunni militants advancing toward the Kurdish capital of Irbil.  

Democratic Senator Jeanne Shaheen says she supports the dual mission of stopping the advance of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, or ISIS, and providing humanitarian relief to thousands of Yazidis trapped on Mount Sinjar.  But she’s wary of expanding U.S. involvement in the conflict.

U.S. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen is emphasizing parts of the health care overhaul law that help seniors, while one of the Republicans hoping to unseat her is arguing against it.

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

  The Republican Candidates vying for the chance to run against Jeanne Shaheen for Senate in November were stumping in Concord over the weekend. Scott Brown, Jim Rubens and Bob Smith faced questions about agricultural and timber policies at an event hosted by the New Hampshire Farm Bureau and the Timberland Owners Association at Carter Hill Orchard.

Brown used the opportunity to say that he wants to cut the red tape required to get temporary worker visas.

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz has joined Republicans injecting immigration into New Hampshire's U.S. Senate contest.

The conservative firebrand is out with a fundraising message Friday attacking New Hampshire's Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen for supporting President Barack Obama's quote, "amnesty" immigration policies. Cruz becomes the second Republican eying the presidency this week to criticize Shaheen on immigration. Texas Gov. Rick Perry made similar charges, which Democrats called "desperate."

Purple Heart
mattscoggin / Flickr Creative Commons

The family of a World War I veteran from New Hampshire has been presented with some long-overdue service medals.   Frank Silva's son, Cmdr. Frank Silva, and daughter, Kathleen Talley, received the Purple Heart and other medals on Friday at the American Legion, Post 37 in Hooksett.   Sen. Jeanne Shaheen presented the medals.   Silva served in France after enlisting in the Army in July 1917. Silva was originally assigned to the Yankee Division, which would later become the 101st Field Artillery Unit. During his time in the Army, Mr.

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