Jeanne Shaheen

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The polls had predicted this race would be tight, and for a time last night, even after media outlets had declared Jeanne Shaheen the winner, Scott Brown briefly held a slim lead. But by nights end, it was Shaheen and her backers savoring a win in a contest party leaders here and in Washington wanted dearly.

“Tonight, tonight, the people of NH chose to put NH first.” 

If you are seeking nuance or restraint, you wont find it at a  get out the vote rally on the Sunday before a tight election.  

Here’s State GOP chairman Jennifer Horn last night in Manchester:

"This is our time. We need to crush it. We need to grab it.  We need to run with it, push their heads under over and over again until they cannot breathe anymore, until the elections are over Tuesday night."   

Sara Plourde

Spending on the New Hampshire Senate race cracked the $46 million mark this week to become the most expensive election campaign in Granite State history.

And to the surprise of no one, outside groups have far outspent the candidates: party organizations, political action committees, super PACS and other non-candidate groups have poured $28.7 million into the race, one of a handful of closely watched contests that will determine which party controls the U.S. Senate.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The candidates split on key issues from the start. Asked to identify the greatest threat facing America, Scott brown was unequivocal:  radical Islamic Jihadists.

"It's something that’s real, that’s serious. Obviously we have Boko Haram in Africa, we have ISIS and Al- Qaeda elements, still, and their number one goal is to disrupt and dismantle the society as we know it.  Senator Shaheen has called what we are discussing fear-mongering. I call it a very rational fear."

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Republican Scott Brown and Democrat Jeanne Shaheen hit familiar themes on the US senate campaign trail today.

Brown  campaigned alongside former Governor John Sununu in Seabrook, while Shaheen stumped at a Manchester tech company.

Scott Brown’s visit to the Seabrook station nuclear plant was off-limits to reporters, but according to his campaign, Brown wanted to underscore the role nuclear power needs to play in US energy policy and Shaheen’s past criticism of Seabrook.

Shaheen, meanwhile, visited the Dyn corporation

Fred Bever for NHPR

Former GOP Presidential nominee John McCain was back in New Hampshire today, stumping for the Republican ticket.

In an appearance at the American Legion Hall, the Arizona Senator nodded in agreement as Republican senate candidate Scott Brown asserted that Shaheen should have joined in a letter that called on President Obama to leave a residual force in Iraq. The American people have been failed by the administration’s foreign policy, Brown says. 

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Democrat Jeanne Shaheen was joined on the campaign trail this weekend by one of her party’s biggest stars: Elizabeth Warren, the Massachusetts Senator who defeated Scott Brown in 2012. While Shaheen’s campaign stops targeted core Democratic constituencies – college towns and union halls --  Scott Brown’s campaign sought votes a bit farther afield.

Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren made one thing clear to the crowd at the University of New Hampshire.  Scott Brown is not from here.

cnn.com

In their second televised debate, U.S. Senate candidates Democrat Jeanne Shaheen and Republican Scott Brown clashed on how to best handle the threat of ISIS.

Brown repeatedly tried to link Shaheen to President Obama, including on the fight against the Islamic State.

“Senator, with respect, the Kurds are hanging on for dear life, they’re in trouble. The Iraqi government is in trouble. ISIS is the size of New England right now, and you and the president have taken ground troops off the table, which is the worst thing you can do.”

NHPR Staff

The dynamic of this high-profile race has changed little since former Massachusetts Senator Scott Brown began plotting a return to Washington, from New Hampshire, the state in which he spent his early childhood.

Last night's NECN/Concord Monitor/UNH debate at the Capital Center for the Arts in Concord was true to form.

Jeanne Shaheen repeatedly cast Brown as an opportunist:

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/barackobamadotcom/">BarackObamaDotCom</a> / Flickr

Former President Bill Clinton tried to light a fire under New Hampshire Democrats at the party’s annual Jefferson-Jackson dinner in Manchester last night.

He warned that without a more energetic voter turnout effort, Democrats could take a big hit, as they did in 2010.

As Election Day draws near we’re checking in each week on political ads and ad spending with Dave Levinthal, Senior Political Reporter for the Center for Public Integrity.

Over the past week Levinthal says political ads have turned negative – really negative.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

There’s a painted blue line surrounding the entrance to the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard. Over that blue line, political campaigning is not allowed, but just a few inches on this side of it – politics are in motion.

Over the last few months, Shipyard unions have endorsed at least five candidates, most of them Democrats. 

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

  Environmental issues have never ranked high on the list of issues that drive most voters to the polls. But this year, Tom Steyer – a former hedge fund manager and billionaire – has pledged to spend $50 million dollars in a few key races around the country, hoping to make climate change a central issue. This spending begs a question: can talking about global warming actually win elections?

Steyer’s operation in New Hampshire, NextGen Climate, has 24 full-time staff, and 5 field offices with two more slated to open in the coming weeks.

Here’s a statement about campaign advertising that may surprise you even if you’ve seen the influx of ads on TV and online video sites: “Candidates, parties and groups ran at least 10,300 TV ads in the New Hampshire U.S. Senate race.”

That statement comes from a project called “Who’s Buying the Senate?”

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Scott Brown has tried to make the New Hampshire Senate race about national security, illegal immigration and incumbent Jeanne Shaheen’s political fidelity to an unpopular president.

But the Republican candidate has spent a lot of time the past two weeks defending his somewhat ambiguous record on abortion rights. The issue boiled over Tuesday at a hastily organized “media availability” in Derry, where Brown was set to talk foreign policy with Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla).

via YouTube

The US Senate campaigns of Jeanne Shaheen and Scott Brown continue to battle over Brown’s record on abortion.

A day after Jeanne Shaheen’s campaign aired an ad highlighting a Scott Brown’s sponsorship of  2005 bill in the Massachusetts legislature that sought to imposed a 24-waiting period for abortion and require women to be provided with images of fetus, the Brown campaign was up with an ad of his own.

It features Brown speaking right into the camera.

NHPR / Michael Brindley

Florida U.S. Senator Marco Rubio was in New Hampshire Tuesday to endorse Republican Scott Brown in the race for U.S. Senate.

Speaking with Brown at an event in Derry that focused on foreign policy, Rubio says re-electing Democrat Jeanne Shaheen would be disastrous.

“Your current United State Senator, if she’s reelected, God forbid, the first vote she will take is to re-elect Harry Reid as the majority leader, someone who uses the United States Senate as a platform to run interference for the failed foreign policy of this president.”

NHPR / Michael Brindley

Republican Scott Brown called on opponent Democrat Jeanne Shaheen to pull an ad he says misrepresents the so-called Women’s Right to Know bill he co-sponsored as a Massachusetts state senator.

The ad was controversial from the moment it began running.

For the Shaheen campaign, this ad is the sharpest effort yet in the race for U.S. Senate to undercut Scott Brown’s record on abortion rights.

Substance, Sparks in First Shaheen-Brown Debate

Oct 6, 2014

Senator Jeanne Shaheen and her Republican challenger, Scott Brown, debated for the first time yesterday in North Conway.

But both candidates focused more on spelling out big differences on policy than they did on rehashing the pointed attack lines promoted by their respective campaigns.

The charged sloganeering wasn't entirely absent. In his opening statement, Brown delivered his campaign’s fundamental argument: That Shaheen votes with President Obama and his polices 99 percent of the time.

Brown, Shaheen Spar In First Debate

Oct 6, 2014
Boverman/Jensen for NHPR

Democratic Senator Jeanne Shaheen and GOP challenger Scott Brown sparred over reproductive rights Monday in a debate held at North Conway’s Grand Hotel.

Shaheen used this debate to emphasized her record supporting access to abortion and contraception, and to question Brown’s claim that he is pro-choice.

NHPR Staff

  U.S. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen and her Republican challenger Scott Brown are meeting for the first of several debates ahead of the November elections.

Monday's debate in North Conway is being hosted by the Mount Washington Valley Economic Council, which represents a dozen towns and works to attract new businesses to the area.

Shaheen, a former governor, is seeking a second term in the Senate. Brown won a special election in 2010 in Massachusetts, lost the seat two years later and moved to New Hampshire in late 2013.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Laura Knoy sat down with U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen for an in-depth discussion about the issues on New Hampshire voters’ minds this election season.

More information about NHPR's special election series presented with UNH Law School can be found here.

GUEST:

  • Jeanne Shaheen - U.S. Senator for New Hampshire. Previously, she also served as Governor of New Hampshire.

Watch the interview:

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Democratic incumbent U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen says U.S. air strikes against ISIS in Syria were a necessary step toward defeating the terrorist group.

Senator Shaheen acknowledged the quandary of working with a Syrian government that just a year ago was forced to hand over chemical weapons it allegedly used on its own people.

But in an interview Tuesday night with NHPR’s Laura Knoy at the UNH School of Law, Shaheen, a member of the foreign relations committee, said there were no other options.

Boverman/Jensen for NHPR

Democratic Senator Jeanne Shaheen is making a big push for the women’s vote, which for three decades has tilted toward her party. But this year, GOP challenger Scott Brown is trying to exploit what may be a new vulnerability for Democratic candidates – women’s disenchantment with the way President Obama is handling the threat of the so-called Islamic State.

The race could come down to what’s highest on women’s minds come election day  – social and economic issues such as abortion and pay equity, or… national security.

Sara Plourde / NHPR

NHPR and UNH School of Law present

Jeanne Shaheen
Democratic candidate for US Senate

September 30th at 5:30pm
Reception to follow

UNH School of Law, 2 White Street, Concord, NH

Join Laura Knoy for an in-depth discussion with the candidates about the issues on New Hampshire voters’ minds this election season. Each forum will be broadcast the following day during The Exchange at 9 am on the stations of NHPR.

Chris Jensen for NHPR

Jeanne Shaheen kicked off her week of women’s themed events by collecting the endorsement of NARAL-Pro-Choice America PAC, and by telling reporters to take Scott Brown’s claims of having a pro-choice record with a grain of salt.

“He can try and say all he wants to that he has been pro-choice. The fact is that’s not the way he vote when he was in Massachusetts – check his record – and that’s not the way he has voted in Washington.”

NHPR / Michael Brindley

On the campaign trail Monday, Republican U.S. Senate candidate Scott Brown continued to rail against the Affordable Care Act, taking aim specifically at the employer mandate.

During an event at North Country Tractor in Pembroke, Brown highlighted a part of the health law yet to kick in: a requirement that businesses with 50 or more full-time employees offer health insurance benefits.

The store’s owner says that’s why he’s stopped hiring at 47 employees.

Brown says it’s an example of how so-called Obamacare is hurting New Hampshire businesses.

Sam Evans-Brown

New Hampshire's gubernatorial and U.S. Senate candidates are addressing energy industry leaders, consumers and policy makers at an annual summit in Concord.

The New Hampshire Energy Summit being held Monday is organized by the Dupont Group and the New Hampshire Independent Energy Council, a coalition of non-utility electric generators, renewable generation developers, private transmission companies and electricity suppliers.

Gov. Maggie Hassan and her Republican challenger both will speak, as will U.S. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen and Republican Scott Brown.

Chris Jensen / NHPR

Senator Jeanne Shaheen says she may have missed some meetings of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee but she is working against terrorism...

According to an article in the Boston Herald during this Congressional session Shaheen has missed 11 of the 30 meetings at which the committee published a report.

But Shaheen says it is wrong to conclude that she has been derelict and isn’t engaged in efforts to combat threats such as ISIS.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

No later than 11 a.m. this morning, Senator Jeanne Shaheen celebrated the four-year anniversary of the Senate's Small Business Jobs and Credit Act with a few sips of Smutty.

Smuttynose’s new brewery in Hampton was financed in part with loans from the Small Business Jobs and Credit Act. That bill, which became law in 2010, created a $30 billion lending program through the U.S. Treasury.

Shaheen hoped to shine a spotlight on that bill today because she and her opponent, former Massachusetts Senator, Scott Brown both voted on it.

Pages