keno

Courtesy of the N.H. Lottery Commission

Rochester officials will be hosting a recount next week on the passage of the electronic gambling game Keno.

Last week voters in the city approved Keno by just one vote.

AP

Earlier this week a majority of cities in New Hampshire voted to allow the electronic gambling game Keno. But three communities rejected it.

And regardless of where in the state Keno is approved, under the new law now legalizing it, every school district will get the same share from Keno revenues to help pay for full-day kindergarten.

That’s left some people wondering how fair the new law really is.

AP Photo /Mark Duncan

Rochester appears to be the community most divided over whether to allow Keno within city limits – the game passed there by a mere one vote, according to results from the local clerk’s office as of late Tuesday night.

Otherwise, voters across New Hampshire were split on the issue of whether to allow Keno in their communities. Seven of the 10 cities where it was on the ballot voted in favor of permitting the game.

Map: What NH Towns Will Have KENO?

Allegra Boverman / for NHPR

9:15 p.m. -- Democrat Joyce Craig has been elected mayor of Manchester, the first woman to ever win that office.

Craig defeated 4-term incumbent mayor Ted Gatsas by roughly 2,000 votes to claim the top spot in New Hampshire’s largest city.

FILE

Voters in cities across New Hampshire are heading to the polls Tuesday to cast ballots for  city leaders, candidates for school board and police commissioner, and for local election officials.

AP

The electronic gambling game is up for a vote in 10 cities - including Manchester and Nashua. Franklin already had their election last month, and Keno overwhelmingly passed there.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: October 20, 2017

Oct 20, 2017

The Granite State makes a pitch for Amazon "H.Q. Two," and the governor reverses course on commuter rail. And why the no-show for Keno?  Hearings on the electronic bingo game Keno are noticeably empty.  We also talk about how the opioid crisis is affecting the Manchester mayoral race.

AP/Mark Duncan

This week Franklin became the first place in New Hampshire to allow the electronic gambling game Keno to be played in its borders.

Last legislative session lawmakers legalized Keno to help pay for full-day kindergarten in the state.

Now that it can be played in Franklin – what does that mean for the businesses that want it?

NHPR’s Paige Sutherland joins All Things Considered host Peter Biello to break down some of those details.

NHPR File

New Hampshire Lottery Director Charlie McIntyre says Granite Staters currently spend about $25 million a year playing keno in Massachusetts.

That is one reason the state is upbeat about a new law that gives cities and towns the option to allow keno gambling. A projected $9 million in revenue will help fund full-day kindergarten.

Voters in eleven cities will weigh that ballot question this fall. But not everyone is so gung-ho about it.

On this episode: The lottery game keno heads to individual cities for approval by voters. Supporters hope it will boost local economies, while critics worry about gambling. And later in the show, Senator Jeb Bradley updates us on efforts to improve Medicaid Expansion. 


AP/Mark Duncan

The electronic bingo game Keno will be on Nashua’s ballot this fall.

The city’s board of aldermen voted unanimously without debate to do so Tuesday. A public hearing is scheduled for Oct. 10.

Manchester, Berlin, Laconia and Rochester will also have Keno on the ballot. So far Portsmouth is the only city yet to reject it.

Earlier this year the Governor legalized Keno, but each city and town will decide whether it’s played in its borders. Revenue generated from the games will go to fund full-day kindergarten programs statewide.

The cities of Rochester and Portsmouth made opposite moves on Keno Tuesday night.

The state’s new Keno law leaves it up to communities to decide whether to allow the electronic gambling game in their restaurants and bars.

In Portsmouth, city councilors voted 7-2 not to put Keno on the ballot this November.

Councilor Nancy Pearson was among the no votes.

“We had a handful of members of the restaurant community in the room tonight, and they walked out. Nobody wants this.”

AP/Mark Duncan

Voters in a New Hampshire city will be able to determine whether the gambling game Keno should be played in restaurants and bars.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

The electronic gambling game Keno is now legal in New Hampshire, but that doesn’t mean cities and towns have to allow it. Towns will debate that in March. Right now, cities are considering whether to put Keno on the ballot for their November elections.

This is where Charlie McIntyre comes in.

AP/Mark Duncan

Manchester voters will consider whether Keno should be played within its city’s borders this Fall. The city’s aldermen voted late Tuesday night with little debate to put the question to residents on the city’s upcoming ballot. 

NHPR Staff

Residents in the New Hampshire capital will get the chance to vote on whether to allow a lottery game in restaurants and bars whose proceeds will to fund full-day kindergarten.

The Concord Monitor reports that city councilors voted Monday to add the question to November ballots and hold a public hearing to discuss the proposal.

FILE

Manchester aldermen will consider whether to ban smoking from city parks on Tuesday. They’ll also debate whether to put a question to allow Keno in the city on November’s ballot.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: August 11, 2017

Aug 10, 2017

N.H.'s Attorney General files to sue Purdue Pharma over its role in the state’s opioid crisis. The President declared the opioid crisis a national public health emergency - or did he?  The ACLU and the Secretary of State's Office agree N.H. will share voter information with the Trump election commission, but not as a digital database.  And Keno will be on the ballot in several N.H. cities this November.


With the electronic gambling game keno now legal in New Hampshire, city governments across the state are starting to consider whether they want it in their communities.

AP/Mark Duncan

Just weeks after New Hampshire legalized Keno, the state’s lottery commission has started pitching the electronic bingo game to cities across the state.

Under the new law, money raised by Keno will go towards full-day kindergarten programs statewide. But the game will only be allowed in cities and towns that approve it. 

AP/Mark Duncan

The Nashua Board of Aldermen will hold a special meeting Tuesday to discuss the electronic bingo game Keno.

Last month Gov. Chris Sununu signed legislation legalizing Keno, but where the game can be played is still up to cities and towns.

More than five decades after establishing the first state lottery, New Hampshire is for the first time dedicating a portion of lottery profits toward treatment for gambling addiction.

Governor Chris Sununu on The Exchange

Jul 7, 2017

Today on The Exchange, Governor Chris Sununu sits down with Laura for the full hour to give his take on several topics, including national health care reform and its possible impact on the Granite State.

Also up for discussion: the state's continuing opioids crisis, including the high number of overdoses in June. And we'll hear from the Governor on so-called "Keno-garten," the expansion of kindergarten with money from the Keno electronic game of chance. 


Josh Rogers for NHPR

Two of the year’s biggest policy proposals, the state budget and full-day kindergarten, both bank on the state collecting more money from gamblers.

In total, close to $30 million - via Keno and online lottery tickets. The changes mark the biggest expansion of gambling in New Hampshire in more than a decade.


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 30th, 2017

Jun 30, 2017

Governor Sununu and other New Hampshire lawmakers announced their opposition to the proposed healthcare bill from the U.S. Senate.  "Keno-garten" comes to the Granite State, but critics worry the new funding from the electronic gambling game Keno won't be enough for widespread full-day kindergarten programs. And Mayor Ted Gatsas of Manchester announces his re-election campaign, amongst some controversy. 


Last week, lawmakers in Concord signed off on a plan to provide state support for full-day kindergarten in New Hampshire. The new law will use revenue from the electronic gambling game keno to give school districts more money for full-day kindergarten.

NHPR reporter Jason Moon recently sat down with NHPR host Sally Hirsch-Dickinson to talk about what this mean for schools and town across New Hampshire. Listen to their conversation here.

AP Photo /Mark Duncan

Last week, the New Hampshire legislature voted to legalize the electronic bingo game Keno. This is an issue that has come up in the Statehouse several times in the past but has never been able to clear both chambers.

The proposal now heads to Governor Chris Sununu who said he’d sign it – making New Hampshire one of about 18 other states who operate Keno.

NHPR reporter Paige Sutherland joined Morning Edition to discuss what this means for New Hampshire residents.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 23, 2017

Jun 23, 2017

Catch up on this week's stop N.H. stories:  The New Hampshire House and Senate pass an $11.7 billion budget. Despite a Republican majority, GOP leaders had to work hard to pass this spending plan, but it's now on its way to the Governor's desk.  Another fraught issue for both sides of the aisle: a bill funding full-day kindergarten.  And more than 80 Great Dane dogs were rescued from a puppy mill operating out of a mansion in Wolfeboro.

Brian Wallstin for NHPR

After a lengthy debate in both the House and the Senate, the full legislature passed a bill Thursday that funds full-day kindergarten by legalizing the electronic bingo game Keno.

On Thursday, a proposal to spend state money on full-day kindergarten heads to a final vote.

The bill, which pays for additional state spending on kindergarten by taxing keno, is making for tough decisions on both sides of the aisle.

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