keno

On this episode: The lottery game keno heads to individual cities for approval by voters. Supporters hope it will boost local economies, while critics worry about gambling. And later in the show, Senator Jeb Bradley updates us on efforts to improve Medicaid Expansion. 

Audio for this show will be posted shortly after it airs. 

AP/Mark Duncan

The electronic bingo game Keno will be on Nashua’s ballot this fall.

The city’s board of aldermen voted unanimously without debate to do so Tuesday. A public hearing is scheduled for Oct. 10.

Manchester, Berlin, Laconia and Rochester will also have Keno on the ballot. So far Portsmouth is the only city yet to reject it.

Earlier this year the Governor legalized Keno, but each city and town will decide whether it’s played in its borders. Revenue generated from the games will go to fund full-day kindergarten programs statewide.

The cities of Rochester and Portsmouth made opposite moves on Keno Tuesday night.

The state’s new Keno law leaves it up to communities to decide whether to allow the electronic gambling game in their restaurants and bars.

In Portsmouth, city councilors voted 7-2 not to put Keno on the ballot this November.

Councilor Nancy Pearson was among the no votes.

“We had a handful of members of the restaurant community in the room tonight, and they walked out. Nobody wants this.”

AP/Mark Duncan

Voters in a New Hampshire city will be able to determine whether the gambling game Keno should be played in restaurants and bars.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

The electronic gambling game Keno is now legal in New Hampshire, but that doesn’t mean cities and towns have to allow it. Towns will debate that in March. Right now, cities are considering whether to put Keno on the ballot for their November elections.

This is where Charlie McIntyre comes in.

AP/Mark Duncan

Manchester voters will consider whether Keno should be played within its city’s borders this Fall. The city’s aldermen voted late Tuesday night with little debate to put the question to residents on the city’s upcoming ballot. 

NHPR Staff

Residents in the New Hampshire capital will get the chance to vote on whether to allow a lottery game in restaurants and bars whose proceeds will to fund full-day kindergarten.

The Concord Monitor reports that city councilors voted Monday to add the question to November ballots and hold a public hearing to discuss the proposal.

FILE

Manchester aldermen will consider whether to ban smoking from city parks on Tuesday. They’ll also debate whether to put a question to allow Keno in the city on November’s ballot.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: August 11, 2017

Aug 10, 2017

N.H.'s Attorney General files to sue Purdue Pharma over its role in the state’s opioid crisis. The President declared the opioid crisis a national public health emergency - or did he?  The ACLU and the Secretary of State's Office agree N.H. will share voter information with the Trump election commission, but not as a digital database.  And Keno will be on the ballot in several N.H. cities this November.


With the electronic gambling game keno now legal in New Hampshire, city governments across the state are starting to consider whether they want it in their communities.

AP/Mark Duncan

Just weeks after New Hampshire legalized Keno, the state’s lottery commission has started pitching the electronic bingo game to cities across the state.

Under the new law, money raised by Keno will go towards full-day kindergarten programs statewide. But the game will only be allowed in cities and towns that approve it. 

AP/Mark Duncan

The Nashua Board of Aldermen will hold a special meeting Tuesday to discuss the electronic bingo game Keno.

Last month Gov. Chris Sununu signed legislation legalizing Keno, but where the game can be played is still up to cities and towns.

More than five decades after establishing the first state lottery, New Hampshire is for the first time dedicating a portion of lottery profits toward treatment for gambling addiction.

Governor Chris Sununu on The Exchange

Jul 7, 2017

Today on The Exchange, Governor Chris Sununu sits down with Laura for the full hour to give his take on several topics, including national health care reform and its possible impact on the Granite State.

Also up for discussion: the state's continuing opioids crisis, including the high number of overdoses in June. And we'll hear from the Governor on so-called "Keno-garten," the expansion of kindergarten with money from the Keno electronic game of chance. 


Josh Rogers for NHPR

Two of the year’s biggest policy proposals, the state budget and full-day kindergarten, both bank on the state collecting more money from gamblers.

In total, close to $30 million - via Keno and online lottery tickets. The changes mark the biggest expansion of gambling in New Hampshire in more than a decade.


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 30th, 2017

Jun 30, 2017

Governor Sununu and other New Hampshire lawmakers announced their opposition to the proposed healthcare bill from the U.S. Senate.  "Keno-garten" comes to the Granite State, but critics worry the new funding from the electronic gambling game Keno won't be enough for widespread full-day kindergarten programs. And Mayor Ted Gatsas of Manchester announces his re-election campaign, amongst some controversy. 


Last week, lawmakers in Concord signed off on a plan to provide state support for full-day kindergarten in New Hampshire. The new law will use revenue from the electronic gambling game keno to give school districts more money for full-day kindergarten.

NHPR reporter Jason Moon recently sat down with NHPR host Sally Hirsch-Dickinson to talk about what this mean for schools and town across New Hampshire. Listen to their conversation here.

AP Photo /Mark Duncan

Last week, the New Hampshire legislature voted to legalize the electronic bingo game Keno. This is an issue that has come up in the Statehouse several times in the past but has never been able to clear both chambers.

The proposal now heads to Governor Chris Sununu who said he’d sign it – making New Hampshire one of about 18 other states who operate Keno.

NHPR reporter Paige Sutherland joined Morning Edition to discuss what this means for New Hampshire residents.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 23, 2017

Jun 23, 2017

Catch up on this week's stop N.H. stories:  The New Hampshire House and Senate pass an $11.7 billion budget. Despite a Republican majority, GOP leaders had to work hard to pass this spending plan, but it's now on its way to the Governor's desk.  Another fraught issue for both sides of the aisle: a bill funding full-day kindergarten.  And more than 80 Great Dane dogs were rescued from a puppy mill operating out of a mansion in Wolfeboro.

Brian Wallstin for NHPR

After a lengthy debate in both the House and the Senate, the full legislature passed a bill Thursday that funds full-day kindergarten by legalizing the electronic bingo game Keno.

On Thursday, a proposal to spend state money on full-day kindergarten heads to a final vote.

The bill, which pays for additional state spending on kindergarten by taxing keno, is making for tough decisions on both sides of the aisle.

Jason Moon for NHPR

House and Senate lawmakers have settled on the final language for a bill to fund full day kindergarten in New Hampshire. But the bipartisan cooperation around the bill may be faltering.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The House finance committee has given its unanimous backing to a full-day kindergarten proposal tied to the lottery game Keno.

Under the bill, the state would send school districts that have full-day kindergarten an extra $1100 per pupil starting in 2019.

The bill would also authorize cities and towns to allow Keno. The state's take from the video lottery game would be deposited in the state's education trust fund. The account the new Kindergarten aid would be drawn from. Neal Kurk is chairman of the House Finance Committee.

Brian Wallstin for NHPR

Budget writers in the N.H. House are eyeing the lottery game Keno as a way to fund full day kindergarten. The state senate has always opposed Keno and Governor Sununu says he's yet to see the details of the plan.

Brian Wallstin for NHPR

A bill to legalize the video lottery game Keno in New Hampshire received pushback from lawmakers Wednesday for being too restrictive.

Brian Wallstin for NHPR

A bill seeking to legalize Keno in New Hampshire fell flat once again in the state Senate.

Lawmakers voted 13 to 10 to kill the proposal which would have allowed Keno, a form of electronic bingo, in places with liquor licenses, but only after individual approval from cities and towns. 

Senator Jerry Little of Weare said Keno would mean money for the state - $8 to $9 million a year he calculated.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

After having a 7-day vacation, lawmakers will return to Concord this week. The full Senate will be meeting on Thursday to take up more than 40 bills. Meanwhile the full House won’t come back until next Wednesday.

Brian Wallstin for NHPR

A bill aimed to legalize Keno in New Hampshire again passed the N.H. House. The measure will now head to the Senate – where a similar bill died during the previous legislative session.

Keno Bill To Go Before New Hampshire House

Jan 18, 2016
Brian Wallstin for NHPR

  House lawmakers are set to take up a bill this week that would allow keno at bars and restaurants that serve alcohol.

News Primer: What's In The New Keno Bill?

Feb 18, 2015
Brian Wallstin for NHPR

Lawmakers heard testimony Tuesday on a House bill to bring keno to New Hampshire bars and restaurants. Sponsors say the electronic game could raise some $8.5 million annually for education, while Gov. Maggie Hassan’s two-year budget projects $26 million in keno revenue.

NHPR’s digital journalist Brian Wallstin reported on keno legislation a year ago that died in the Senate, and he joins us now to give us an update on this year’s proposal.

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