Lakes Region

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

Every community has an issue which an outsider might look at and say, ‘That? You’re fighting about that?’

In Gilmanton, that’s the Year-Round Library.

The library is a private non-profit, but is open to the public. It’s in a gorgeous refurbished timber-frame barn; two stories tall with old rough-hewn beams surrounded by a modern shell. It was built through private fundraising, and fundraising helps pay operating costs too.  

Daryl Carlson/KamaraImage.com

Most people in New Hampshire associate Laconia with the annual summer Motorcycle Week Rally.

But another event, equally important to the city’s history, takes place this weekend.

The 83rd Laconia World Championship Sled Dog Derby has been around almost as long at Bike Week.

Trail Boss Jim Lyman, whose grandfather helped start the local sled dog derby in 1929, says Laconia’s sled dog event is one of the oldest in the country with ties back to the modern origin of the sport.

Courtesy Northeastern Ballet Theatre

Wolfeboro ballet instructor Edra Toth knows what it feels like to be misunderstood.

On Saturday night, her nonprofit Northeast Ballet Theater will present Dracula, a ballet written by Toth. In it, Toth’s dance ensemble will illustrate the truth about Dracula – or, more accurately, the original historical figure he’s based on, a militant ruler named Vlad Tepes.

Three beaches in Laconia that tested positive for bacteria last week are now in the clear.

The Parks and Recreation Department says Opechee Cove, Opechee Point and Weirs Beach posted advisories for high E. coli levels between Aug. 19 and Aug. 21.

Director Kevin Dunleavy tells The Citizen the beaches now all have clearance after further testing.

Daryl Carlson/kamaraimage.com

Every kid knows there’s something magical about being in a tree house.

Sure, you can play “house” anywhere and pretend to be living out the joys and jobs of adulthood. But in a tree house, you’re 10, 15, or 20 feet up in the air, far above any adults telling you how do to things. It’s like playing house and being a superhero, all the same time.

And that feeling is one you can never forget, Laconia’s Randy Bartlett discovered.

Kayakers and canoeists are hoping to break two world records in Laconia, New Hampshire, this weekend.

LakeFest 2014: Raft-a-Palooza takes place Sunday at Weirs Beach on Lake Winnipesaukee. Following a "Blessing of the Fleet" in the morning, paddlers will attempt to break the Guinness World Record for the largest raft of canoes and kayaks. The current record was set in Michigan with 2,099 boats.

The group also hopes to beat the record for the number of kayaks and canoes launched simultaneously. A group in Tasmania set the record with 308 boats last year.

Courtesy Joe Del Russo

Someone in your family probably remembers a time when receiving a letter was unusual. The message was typically handwritten and personal, and it told you that someone in another part of the world thought enough about you to sit down, organize their thoughts and craft a message, just for you.

There are still places in New Hampshire where getting mail is just as special, mostly because of how it's delivered.

The "Red Raider" logo is staying put at a New Hampshire high school for now.

The student council at Belmont High School held a community forum last month taking comment on whether they should change or retire the black and red graphic of a Native American.

On Tuesday, the Shaker Regional School Board voted down the council's request to change the logo, but encouraged a public vote on the matter at next year's District Meeting.

The idea of changing the name came up after a discussion in a social studies class.

Goldeneye via Flickr CC

New Hampshire officials are getting hit with calls, emails and tweets reacting to racist comments made by a town police commissioner.

Jim Bouley, mayor of the capital city of Concord, said the reaction from as far away as California included threats to cancel vacations in New Hampshire. The calls started Thursday after news reports detailed comments by Wolfeboro Police Commissioner Robert Copeland, who admitted using the N-word to describe President Barack Obama.

Karen Cardoza via Flickr CC

As summer approaches, boaters who enjoy spending time on Lake Winnipesaukee have their eyes focused on two things: the weather and the lake level.

Most lakes have natural high and low seasonal water points caused by the whims of nature. But the state’s largest lakes are too important to New Hampshire’s tourism economy to be left to chance.

Via WeirsBeach.com

The Lakeport Dam is only about 222-feet wide and more than 60 years old, but it stands at a unique New Hampshire crossroads.

Upstream is Lake Winnipesaukee, the state’s largest lake covering more than 44½ thousands of acres of surface area and plunging to a depth of up to 212 feet.

Downstream is  the Winnipesaukee River, which travels through downtown Laconia (“The City of Lakes”) and then into Lake Winnisquam, the fourth-largest lake in New Hampshire.

Belmont Students Aim To Change 'Red Raider' Mascot

Apr 17, 2014

Three Belmont High School students are taking on an issue few adults would tackle these days.

Student Council members Andre Bragg, Taylor Becker and Ashley Fenimore led a forum Wednesday night where they asked the community to consider whether the school’s mascot – “Red Raider” – was offensive to Native Americans.

The issue came up recently in a Social Studies class and the Council thought the question was significant enough to begin a public dialog.

Courtesy Iona College

It’s like Mickey Mantle’s grandson announcing he’ll be hitting home runs for the Dartmouth College baseball team. Or Julia Ruth Stevens, the daughter of New York Yankee icon Babe Ruth, agreeing to pay for a new baseball park in Derry.

Historic Ice-Out Of Winnipesaukee Expected

Apr 4, 2014
Rimager via Flickr Creative Commons

The man who officially declares the annual ice-out of Lake Winnipesaukee says this year’s announcement could be a record-setter.

Dave Emerson of Emerson Aviation in Gilford said this winter’s cold and snow may mean it’s early May before he can declare what some consider the official start of the New Hampshire summer season.

You Are Here
VTDarkStar / Flickr Creative Commons

 The Department of Environmental Services has lifted the fecal bacteria advisory on Weirs Beach in Laconia.  But advisories remain in place for Bartlett Beach and Opechee Cove. 

DES Beach Program Coordinator Sonya Carlson says contrary to earlier reports, there is no evidence right now that bacteria at the Weirs could be coming from so-called “sewage sludge.” Carlson points to water samples the EPA took there last year looking for traces of pharmaceuticals.

Anyone who’s been in this state in late July has seen  the traffic pattern – the long line of cars and trucks with boats or kayaks or bikes on the back, heading north on the highway to New Hampshire’s Lakes Region.  Some folks are heading toward campgrounds or b&b’s; some others are heading toward their own vacation homes, which in the Lakes Region can be pretty substantial.