Marco Rubio

Former Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio said he stands by comments he made during the bruising GOP primary campaign earlier this year, including referring to Donald Trump, now his party's nominee, as a "con man."

"I've stood by everything I ever said in my campaign," Rubio said in an interview with the Miami Herald editorial board.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

We'll look at the results from the many states that voted yesterday - from Alaska to Massachusetts - and how it all affects the presidential nomination process that began just a month ago in Iowa and New Hampshire.

New Hampshire Primary 2016: Recapping the Results

Feb 10, 2016
Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Last night, the Granite State gave solid victories to Democrat Bernie Sanders and Republican Donald Trump, with John Kasich grabbing a coveted second place the GOP side.  We'll review the results, and what might be next as the candidates pack up their Granite State gear and head to contests elsewhere in the country.

Florida Senator Marco Rubio spoke to voters in Nashua just a few miles from where started his campaign in the state ten months ago. The main idea he offered to folks in this gymnasium: He’s the one candidate who can bring the Republican Party together. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Would-be Presidents are making their final pitches to New Hampshire voters in advance of tomorrow's presidential primary. GOP candidates are crisscrossing the state in the final push.

Governor Chris Christie told voters in Hampstead to recall the final presidential debate as they decide who to vote for.

"And when the lights get really bright, and you are getting tested. You either shine or you melt. When you are sitting in the oval office we do not want a president who will melt."

Kate Brindley for NHPR

  Republican senator Marco Rubio spent Sunday campaigning around the state—from a pancake breakfast in Londonderry to a Super Bowl watch party in Manchester. His stops came a day after Saturday’s GOP debate where other candidates challenged Rubio’s readiness for the job. 

Audio Pending...

Casey McDermott, NHPR

Back in April, Shooter’s Pub in Exeter played host to one of Chris Christie’s first town halls in New Hampshire.

That was months before the New Jersey governor officially announced his bid for president, when he was still just introducing himself to the people of the Granite State.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Marco Rubio got hit hard in Saturday's GOP debate, when Chris Christie accused the Florida senator of sticking to the same rehearsed lines over and over again. And for those few minutes, Rubio seemed unable to break script in the face of the attack.

To be fair, Rubio is certainly a candidate who's loyal to his stump speech. On his visits around New Hampshire, Rubio has essentially stuck to a trusty formula at town halls and rallies. So let's look at speech, and Rubio's classic talking points. Scroll through to read a brief breakdown, and listen to clips.

Before last night’s GOP debate got underway the lawn of St. Anselm college filled with Republican supporters. They had signs and chants—but also mixed in the crowd of 500 or so people were protesters pushing for a $15 federal minimum wage. NHPR’s Natasha Haverty went into the crowd and captured these voices. 


GOP Presidential hopeful Marco Rubio’s pretty much stuck to the same stump speech for months— a focus on America’s God given rights, the threats posed by ISIS, and, a promise to repeal all of President Obama’s executive actions.

He makes the case that he’s the most electable Republican running, referencing Hillary Clinton through the whole speech.

But since Iowa, Rubio’s added one more character to his speech, a guy whose photo made it into the gallery up on the wall here in the large conference room here at St. Anselm: Bernie Sanders.

Richard Taylor and his wife Susan linger in the stands of a hockey rink in Bow at about 9 o'clock in the morning. Marco Rubio’s just finished a town hall. Like most of the people I come across at Rubio's campaign stops, Taylor says he’s weighing Rubio against another candidate—in most cases that’s Ted Cruz.

Natasha Haverty

Florida Senator and Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio kicked off the final stretch in New Hampshire with a rally in Exeter last night. 

In this year's Republican presidential primary, much has been made about a division between insiders and outsiders. But in New Hampshire, perhaps the most intense battle is happening within that insider group. And as the primary campaign enters its final stage, the fight for the mainstream Republican vote is only growing more intense.

NHPR file photos

With every day that passes leading up to the New Hampshire primary, the pressure builds on Republican presidential hopefuls looking to make a splash here.

NHPR/Michael Brindley

Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio is pledging to undo each of President Obama’s executive orders, including his most recent actions aimed at curbing gun violence.

Speaking at a town hall meeting in Nashua Thursday, the Florida Senator said the president’s focus should instead be on enforcing existing gun laws.

"As opposed to try to add new ones that are only going to inconvenience law-abiding people because they're the only ones who are going to follow the law," Rubio said. 

Jason Moon / NHPR

Three Republicans hoping for a big showing in the New Hampshire primary -- Jeb Bush, John Kasich and Marco Rubio -- were busy locally this week. The three are also angling for many of the same voters as Primary Day approaches. NHPR caught up with them in Derry, Bedford and Meredith.

Chris Jensen for NHPR

During a town hall meeting Tuesday night in Bethlehem Republican Presidential candidate Marco Rubio covered plenty of policy turf -- including the New England Patriots.

"Tom Brady should retire, because the Miami Dolphins deserve a chance to win the AFC,” Rubio declared.

Laughter mixed with the tiniest rumble of boos...

“When I’m president, Tom Brady is going to be secretary of the Air Force," Rubio continued. "He knows a lot about throwing stuff and flying…and the Miami Dolphins will have a chance to win the division."

Chris Jensen for NHPR

At a town hall meeting in Bethlehem, N.H. on Tuesday, Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio said the United States must be willing to use military force to stand up for allies such as the Philippines against China’s encroachment on fishing rights and attempts to expand its territorial waters. He compared China’s actions to the use of force by Russia in neighboring Ukraine last year.

“It is not unlike what Vladimir Putin has done in Crimea. He invaded a neighboring country, he took over an area of that country and today everyone has just accepted it.”

Fresh from a GOP debate in which national security issues were dominant, Florida Senator Marco Rubio assured the crowd at a Manchester banquet hall that on his watch American military forces would never have to undertake a fair fight. They would always be better equipped, better trained, and have better intelligence to guide them.

"You know what all of this will mean. it will mean the world will not be perfect, but it will be safer, and it will be better. When America leads, the world is a safer and better place, and when it doesn't the world is chaotic."

A day before the last Republican presidential debate of the year, two Republican candidates held rallies near the Las Vegas strip, less than a mile apart. In spite of their proximity, the events had almost nothing in common.

Marco Rubio was in a medium-size hotel ballroom, with a few hundred people in attendance. It seemed, at first, that Rubio might struggle to fill the room, as supporters came in slowly. But fill it did.

Compared to some of his rivals, Marco Rubio hasn’t been seen much in the Granite State, either in person or on TV.

That’s about to change.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Marco Rubio's pitch to voters in Laconia was loud and clear: his is a candidacy based pitched towards America's future.

"The first thing we must do in this election, both in the Republican party but in the broader electorate, is we must turn the page. We cannot keep electing the same kind of people. Its not because they are evil, it's not because they don't love our country, it's because they don't understand the 21st century."


Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida says radical jihadists are using the refugee crisis as a cover to send terrorists to the West and that it's impossible for the United States to vet some Syrian migrants.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

Presidential candidates Donald Trump, Bernie Sanders, Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio will remain on the New Hampshire Presidential Primary ballot. That’s after the state Ballot Law Commission unanimously voted Tuesday to reject a handful of challenges to their qualifications to run for president. 

Here & Now‘s Republican strategist Paris Dennard says it’s too early to subscribe to the growing sentiment among Washington insiders that the Republican nomination will come down to a contest between Florida Senator Marco Rubio and Texas Senator Ted Cruz.

Dennard will be watching tonight’s fourth GOP debate in Milwaukee, to see which of the eight candidates on the main stage will attack first. He thinks Marco Rubio will be the No. 1 target. He speaks with Here & Now host Jeremy Hobson about what the Florida senator will face.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

When Marco Rubio came into the Secretary of State’s office to file for the New Hampshire primary ballot Thursday – it wasn’t with quite the crowd that his fellow Republican candidate Donald Trump attracted a day earlier. But the Florida senator did bring his own entourage of supporters. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

When Marco Rubio sat down for a  discussion  with young professionals at St. Anselm College the issues were mostly light:

Does Rubio hit the gym to wind down after debates? No.

What kind of food might he serve at a party? Tex-Mex.

And how does the Florida Senator feel about Star Wars?

The Republican presidential race entered a new phase Wednesday night as the outsider candidates, who dominated the first two debates, were upstaged by several of their office-holding rivals — and by a budding controversy over the conduct of the third debate itself.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Johnnie Koromilas has been an active Republican in her home city of Dover for decades. And she did the honors when it came time to introduce Marco Rubio during his visit to the McConnell community center yesterday.

Marco Rubio has no shortage of problems with the way President Obama has conducted his foreign policy.

The Florida senator and GOP presidential candidate says the Obama administration left "chaos" behind in the Middle East after withdrawing troops from Iraq in 2011. In an interview with NPR's Steve Inskeep, Rubio says that Russia has gained leverage from the perception that the United States abandoned the region.