marijuana

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In states all across the country, the days of pot prohibition are coming to an end. Today, critics say new regulations favor so-called the "Walmart weed" industry and put the squeeze on home growers.

Plus, Derrick Hamilton has never been to law school - but that hasn't stopped him from filing federal complaints against inhumane treatment of inmates, and helping others obtain hearings. He also fought the wrongful that put him in jail for 21 years. We'll talk with a jailhouse lawyer who was set up, but still believes in the power of the law.

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 The New Hampshire House has again voted decriminalize marijuana. This proposal would make first offense possession of a 1/4 ounce or less a violation.

The 289-58 vote marked the seventh time house lawmakers have tried to make marijuana possession a violation.

Backers of this proposal, like Hampton Democrat Renny Cushing pitched it as a middle ground.

"This is a compromise that will allow us to have first time offenders who have a small amount of marijuana escape a lifetime of draconian punishment for that and have a second chance."

Photo Credit Katja Rupp, via Flickr Creative Commons

The New Hampshire Senate has rejected a bill to decriminalize possession of up to a half-ounce of marijuana. But opponents say it would be wrong to reduce marijuana penalties in the midst of an opioid crisis.

While the New Hampshire house has repeatedly voted to decriminalize marijuana, the policy has never found favor in the senate. This time was no different. MIlford Republican Gary Daniels compares the state's fight against heroin and Fentayl to a war. He says now would be the wrong time to convey a tolerant attitude towards marijuana.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

After a slow week at the State House, lawmakers will have long session days in both chambers with roughly 60 bills on the docket in the House and Senate. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Both the New Hampshire House and Senate will be in session this week but with a pretty light agenda – only about 20 bills are on the docket in both chambers.

But lawmakers will still hold dozens of public hearings – some to look at loosening up the state’s drug laws and others to build them up.

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A bill that aims make it easier for judges to treat the possession of an ounce or less of marijuana as a violation is winning favor at the state house and has the  support of the  New Hampshire Association of Police Chiefs, which has always opposed loosening state drug laws.

Marijuana decriminalization has passed the New Hampshire House several times. But no decriminalization bill has won favor in the senate. One reason why is the staunch opposition by New Hampshire law enforcement.

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With growing concerns nationally and in New Hampshire about a large and expensive prison population, the House recently passed a bill to repeal mandatory minimum sentences for some offenses. And then later we'll look at another House measure to decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana.

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  Advocates of decriminalizing marijuana say they're hopeful lawmakers will finally send a bill to the governor this year. 

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New Hampshire residents hoping to get access to medical marijuana are still waiting for the state’s dispensaries to open

Right now, those new facilities still have to go through a few more rounds of inspections before they can open their doors and start serving patients. Once they do open, patients will only be able to visit one dispensary at a time. And for residents in the northernmost region of the state, the nearest dispensary could be at least two hours away.

Mark via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/8mdNZs

A bill that would decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana goes before a House committee Tuesday.

The proposal would make possession of up to a half ounce a civil violation with a fine of no more than $100 for a first offense.

Possession of greater amounts would remain a criminal offense.

New Hampshire is the only New England state where the possession of any amount of marijuana remains a criminal offense.

A similar bill passed the House last year, but was tabled in the Senate.

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Mid-life crises are embarrassing and all-too-common...but surely not among the prudent judges of nation's highest court? On today’s show, a former court clerk's new novel imagines a Supreme Court justice going off the rails.

Then, as millions vow to exercise in the new year, we'll hear about how today's gyms are building personal bathrooms and shower stalls for body shy millennials -- one writer thinks it's absurd for adults to fear getting undressed in front of others.

Awaiting N.H.'s Medical Marijuana Program

Sep 24, 2015
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The therapeutic use of cannabis has been legal  for about two years now, but the process of establishing cultivation centers, dispensaries, and ID cards is still underway. While many praise the state for its careful approach, others suffering from conditions they hope to treat with the drug are becoming impatient. 

GUESTS:

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We  sit down with Oregon Congressman Earl Blumenauer, who is in New Hampshire talking about his efforts to ease federal marijuana laws. It’s a huge debate going on around the country, as more states move toward medical marijuana, decriminalization, and, in a few cases, legalization.

Brett Levin/Flickr

A growing majority of Granite Staters support loosening state laws on marijuana, according to a survey from WMUR and the University of New Hampshire.

Sixty percent of residents support legalizing marijuana. That’s up from 54 percent a year ago. Support is strongest among liberals, younger adults and non-churchgoers.

Dank Depot / Flickr / Creative Commons

New Hampshire is among twenty three states that allow therapeutic use of cannabis. Yet often, the process of dispensing it can be rife with legal and logistical challenges, We’ll look at how implementation efforts are shaping up in this state and find out what’s happening elsewhere, as these laws continue to spread across the country.

Paige Sutherland for NHPR

After a long debate Thursday evening, the Senate decided to table a bill that would decriminalize the possession of marijuana, essentially killing it this session.

Under the bill, those found with half an ounce of marijuana or less would receive a $100 fine rather than be charged with a crime. 

Currently all other New England states have similar laws already on the books. Although a similar measure has passed the House numerous times, it has never passed the Senate.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

New Hampshire has a reputation as a place where liberties are prized yet it’s the only New England state where possessing even a small amount of marijuana remains a crime that can land people in jail. A bill before the state’s GOP-controlled legislature would change that, but first it needs to win the backing of Governor Hassan.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

A bill aimed to decriminalize marijuana in New Hampshire is now being considering by the state Senate.

Under the measure, those found with a half an ounce of marijuana or less would receive a $100 fine rather than be charged with a crime. Currently all other New England states have similar laws already on the books.

But in New Hampshire no decriminalization bill has ever passed the Senate, and Governor Maggie Hassan said if it passes she would veto it.

A bill that would decriminalize small amounts of marijuana in New Hampshire goes before a Senate committee Tuesday.

The proposal cleared the House by a wide margin, 297 to 67, last month, but the bill faces a tougher challenge in the Senate.

Gov. Maggie Hassan has threatened to veto such legislation.

The bill’s sponsor, Representative Adam Schroadter, a Newmarket Republican, says he’s seen more support this year from those who had opposed similar efforts in the past.

All but one of the North Country representatives voted Wednesday to decriminalize marijuana.

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Under a law passed last year in New Hampshire, people with certain medical conditions can use marijuana. Now, lawmakers are considering decriminalizing possession of small amounts of the drug and studying the legalization question. These debates are sweeping the country, even as the drug remains illegal under federal law.

Guests:

NHPR

For the sixth time the New Hampshire House has OK’d a bill that would decriminalize marijuana.

The bill, which cleared the House by 297 to 67 yesterday, would make the possession of half an ounce of marijuana subject to a violation rather than jail time.

Republican Adam Schroadter of Newmarket told colleagues the harm associated with this plant is not enough to justify a criminal penalty.

Artwork By: Kate Adams / kck.st/1zWdSus

There are jobs, and then there are dream jobs. On today’s show we’re featuring good gigs and odd jobs.  From a DJ who lives to uncover rare soul albums and share them with the world, to a woman who studies and creates board games for Dartmouth College’s Tilt Factor game lab. Plus, a broke writer who’d much rather read Dostoyevsky than Fifty Shades of Grey tries to break into the lucrative erotic lit genre.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

The N.H. House is again hearing arguments to make marijuana possession punishable by civil penalties, not criminal.

Tuesday at a Criminal Safety Committee hearing crowded with supporters, cosponsor Representative Joe LaChance argued New Hampshire is the only state with criminal penalties for simple possession. 

“What’s the repercussion for that person who may not be able to afford college? Now he has a marijuana conviction, and according to federal law, you may not be eligible for student loans, public housing. What have we done to that person for the rest of their life?”

The House Criminal Justice and Public Safety Committee will hear arguments this Tuesday afternoon for a bill that would decriminalize marijuana possession of an ounce or less. It would also reduce criminal penalties for greater amounts and would make it a misdemeanor to grow up to six marijuana plants.

Penalties for possessing less than an ounce would be a $100 fine for adults or 35 hours community service for a minor.

Possession of any amount of marijuana currently carries with it a misdemeanor charge punishable by up to a year in prison and a fine of up to $2,000.

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This week, The Exchange will play the five best shows of 2014, as voted by you. Here's a November program on the science of marijuana. With legalization in two states now, and a growing number of others allowing medical use of marijuana, advocates and opponents alike are looking for answers to back up their positions.

Logan Shannon / NHPR

Not so long ago, most parents had a pretty simple stance on pot : just say no. But legalization has made the conversation a lot more complicated. On today’s show: how to talk to your kids about marijuana.

Plus, a look at the strange subculture behind the Oxford dictionary’s 2014 word of the year: vape. More on an e-cigarette industry that’s projected to reach 10 billion dollars in the next 3 years.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

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Not so long ago, when talking to kids about marijuana, the script for parents was simple: just say no. But legalization has made the conversation more complicated. On today’s show, how to talk to kids about marijuana.

Then we examine a growing issue for some working parents: the forever clock. From all-night diners to big box stores that never close, our economies run 24-7. We’ll take a look at the latest in around-the-clock service: 24 hour day care.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Substance Abuse And Addiction: N.H. Discusses

Oct 29, 2014
http://nhlistens.org/sites/nhlistens.org/files/media/pdf/New_Futures_Final_Report_Final_Web.pdf / New Hampshire Listens

It’s no secret that substance abuse is a huge and growing problem across the United States. And although New Hampshire is often ranked healthier than other states, substance abuse is one area in which we fare worse. For example, the Granite State is well above average in terms of binge drinking and prescription drug abuse, and below average in prevention and treatment. And now, a new initiative this year brought together community members in conversations across the state to discuss these problems, and the biggest barriers to addressing them.

 

New Hampshire's Senate has refused to consider a House bill that would have decriminalized possession of up to an ounce of marijuana.

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