Awaiting N.H.'s Medical Marijuana Program

Sep 24, 2015
Brett Levin / Flickr/CC

The therapeutic use of cannabis has been legal  for about two years now, but the process of establishing cultivation centers, dispensaries, and ID cards is still underway. While many praise the state for its careful approach, others suffering from conditions they hope to treat with the drug are becoming impatient. 


Brett Levin / Flickr/CC

We  sit down with Oregon Congressman Earl Blumenauer, who is in New Hampshire talking about his efforts to ease federal marijuana laws. It’s a huge debate going on around the country, as more states move toward medical marijuana, decriminalization, and, in a few cases, legalization.

Brett Levin/Flickr

A growing majority of Granite Staters support loosening state laws on marijuana, according to a survey from WMUR and the University of New Hampshire.

Sixty percent of residents support legalizing marijuana. That’s up from 54 percent a year ago. Support is strongest among liberals, younger adults and non-churchgoers.

Dank Depot / Flickr / Creative Commons

New Hampshire is among twenty three states that allow therapeutic use of cannabis. Yet often, the process of dispensing it can be rife with legal and logistical challenges, We’ll look at how implementation efforts are shaping up in this state and find out what’s happening elsewhere, as these laws continue to spread across the country.

Paige Sutherland for NHPR

After a long debate Thursday evening, the Senate decided to table a bill that would decriminalize the possession of marijuana, essentially killing it this session.

Under the bill, those found with half an ounce of marijuana or less would receive a $100 fine rather than be charged with a crime. 

Currently all other New England states have similar laws already on the books. Although a similar measure has passed the House numerous times, it has never passed the Senate.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

New Hampshire has a reputation as a place where liberties are prized yet it’s the only New England state where possessing even a small amount of marijuana remains a crime that can land people in jail. A bill before the state’s GOP-controlled legislature would change that, but first it needs to win the backing of Governor Hassan.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

A bill aimed to decriminalize marijuana in New Hampshire is now being considering by the state Senate.

Under the measure, those found with a half an ounce of marijuana or less would receive a $100 fine rather than be charged with a crime. Currently all other New England states have similar laws already on the books.

But in New Hampshire no decriminalization bill has ever passed the Senate, and Governor Maggie Hassan said if it passes she would veto it.

A bill that would decriminalize small amounts of marijuana in New Hampshire goes before a Senate committee Tuesday.

The proposal cleared the House by a wide margin, 297 to 67, last month, but the bill faces a tougher challenge in the Senate.

Gov. Maggie Hassan has threatened to veto such legislation.

The bill’s sponsor, Representative Adam Schroadter, a Newmarket Republican, says he’s seen more support this year from those who had opposed similar efforts in the past.

All but one of the North Country representatives voted Wednesday to decriminalize marijuana.

Torben Hansen / Flickr/CC

Under a law passed last year in New Hampshire, people with certain medical conditions can use marijuana. Now, lawmakers are considering decriminalizing possession of small amounts of the drug and studying the legalization question. These debates are sweeping the country, even as the drug remains illegal under federal law.



For the sixth time the New Hampshire House has OK’d a bill that would decriminalize marijuana.

The bill, which cleared the House by 297 to 67 yesterday, would make the possession of half an ounce of marijuana subject to a violation rather than jail time.

Republican Adam Schroadter of Newmarket told colleagues the harm associated with this plant is not enough to justify a criminal penalty.

Artwork By: Kate Adams /

There are jobs, and then there are dream jobs. On today’s show we’re featuring good gigs and odd jobs.  From a DJ who lives to uncover rare soul albums and share them with the world, to a woman who studies and creates board games for Dartmouth College’s Tilt Factor game lab. Plus, a broke writer who’d much rather read Dostoyevsky than Fifty Shades of Grey tries to break into the lucrative erotic lit genre.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

The N.H. House is again hearing arguments to make marijuana possession punishable by civil penalties, not criminal.

Tuesday at a Criminal Safety Committee hearing crowded with supporters, cosponsor Representative Joe LaChance argued New Hampshire is the only state with criminal penalties for simple possession. 

“What’s the repercussion for that person who may not be able to afford college? Now he has a marijuana conviction, and according to federal law, you may not be eligible for student loans, public housing. What have we done to that person for the rest of their life?”

The House Criminal Justice and Public Safety Committee will hear arguments this Tuesday afternoon for a bill that would decriminalize marijuana possession of an ounce or less. It would also reduce criminal penalties for greater amounts and would make it a misdemeanor to grow up to six marijuana plants.

Penalties for possessing less than an ounce would be a $100 fine for adults or 35 hours community service for a minor.

Possession of any amount of marijuana currently carries with it a misdemeanor charge punishable by up to a year in prison and a fine of up to $2,000.

Vaporizers_ / Flickr/CC

This week, The Exchange will play the five best shows of 2014, as voted by you. Here's a November program on the science of marijuana. With legalization in two states now, and a growing number of others allowing medical use of marijuana, advocates and opponents alike are looking for answers to back up their positions.

Logan Shannon / NHPR

Not so long ago, most parents had a pretty simple stance on pot : just say no. But legalization has made the conversation a lot more complicated. On today’s show: how to talk to your kids about marijuana.

Plus, a look at the strange subculture behind the Oxford dictionary’s 2014 word of the year: vape. More on an e-cigarette industry that’s projected to reach 10 billion dollars in the next 3 years.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Ryan Van Lenning / via flickr Creative Commons

Not so long ago, when talking to kids about marijuana, the script for parents was simple: just say no. But legalization has made the conversation more complicated. On today’s show, how to talk to kids about marijuana.

Then we examine a growing issue for some working parents: the forever clock. From all-night diners to big box stores that never close, our economies run 24-7. We’ll take a look at the latest in around-the-clock service: 24 hour day care.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Substance Abuse And Addiction: N.H. Discusses

Oct 29, 2014 / New Hampshire Listens

It’s no secret that substance abuse is a huge and growing problem across the United States. And although New Hampshire is often ranked healthier than other states, substance abuse is one area in which we fare worse. For example, the Granite State is well above average in terms of binge drinking and prescription drug abuse, and below average in prevention and treatment. And now, a new initiative this year brought together community members in conversations across the state to discuss these problems, and the biggest barriers to addressing them.


New Hampshire's Senate has refused to consider a House bill that would have decriminalized possession of up to an ounce of marijuana.

Frustration With Medical Marijuana Delays

Apr 17, 2014
West Coast Cannabis / Flickr/CC

Last year, supporters of marijuana use for health purposes cheered when a bill became law. They’ve since been frustrated, however, over the timeframe of dispensaries and patient cards, also the lack of a “grow your own” option.  But others say patience is needed, that implementation should be done carefully to avoid dangerous mistakes.


Dank Depot via Flickr CC

Now that New Hampshire has a law allowing for the use of medicinal marijuana, it might not surprise you to find advertisements about how people can obtain registration cards for the program.

There’s only one catch: there is no such registration card as of yet, and that raises some serious questions about those advertisements and who’s behind them.

Photo Credit Katja Rupp, via Flickr Creative Commons

The New Hampshire House has overwhelmingly passed a bill that would decriminalize possession of up to an ounce of marijuana.

Governor Maggie Hassan, during her State of the State Address, criticized efforts to legalize marijuana. Hassan expressed concerns about New Hampshire’s current drug problem.

Estimates from the state’s revenue agency project New Hampshire could see anywhere from $26.6 million to $39.9 million annually from the taxation of legalized marijuana.

DD via Flickr Creative Commons

Members of a House committee heard from state agencies such as corrections, agriculture, and banking this morning about the impact of legalizing marijuana in the Granite State.

Officials from several state agencies told members of the Ways and Means Committee on Thursday that the drug’s illegal status at the federal level could complicate the issue.

Vaporizers_ / Flickr Creative Commons

Those hoping for the legalization of marijuana in New Hampshire now say they have momentum on their side, coming from several different directions. First, after years of defeats, supporters saw their first real victory in the Granite State last year when medicinal pot was voted into law. Second, marijuana legalization has now passed in two states, Colorado and Washington. And third, a new legalization bill this year passed the house by a slim margin.

Earlier this month, the New Hampshire House became the first legislative body in the United States to pass a bill that would legalize recreational marijuana use.

The legislation faces numerous – some would say intractable - hurdles, beginning with Thursday’s public hearing before the House Ways & Means Committee.


On the Political Front this morning, NHPR's Josh Rogers discusses the results of last week's Republican primary to fill Ray Burton's Executive Council seat, as well as legislation on the docket for this week that would allow for casino gambling and legalizing marijuana in the Granite State.

By roughly a three-to-one margin North Country representatives voted against legalizing marijuana.

As NHPR’s Ryan Lessard reported the debate over HB 492 had those in favor of legalizing the use of small amounts of marijuana saying marijuana was no different than drinking alcohol.

And, those opposed said there were “negative health impacts.”

New Hampshire teens use marijuana at one of the highest rates in the country, according to a new report from the Department of Health and Human Services.

It finds that one in ten minors between the ages of 12 and 17 say they’ve smoked marijuana in the past 30 days. That’s the 9th highest rate in the country, and a full two-percentage points above the U.S. average. The figures are based on a 2012 national survey.