mosquito-borne illness

New research shows that illnesses carried by ticks and mosquitos are on the rise. We talk about why these creatures are carrying more disease, and what you need to know about illnesses such as Lyme, babesiosis, and Zika.

 

Stuart Meek; Wikimedia Commons

On Thursday, June 7th, we will take a look at the rise in insect-borne illnesses, and how environmental and human factors are influencing insect populations. What is causing the increase in disease, and what can we do about it? We'll talk about diseases from mosquitoes and ticks such as Lyme, dengue, Zika, and babeosis. Submit your questions below. 

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fairfaxcounty via Flickr Creative Commons

Public health officials are urging use of bug repellent this season as cases of tick and mosquito-borne disease are on the rise.

The insects have been expanding their range across the U.S., including here in the Northeast, and a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows a significant increase in reported infections.

James Jordan / Flickr CC

A person in Hanover has tested positive for a rare mosquito-borne illness called the Jamestown Canyon Virus, but health officials are stressing this is a sign to take precautions against arboviral illnesses of all kinds.

Tomas K via Flickr / https://flic.kr/p/6qrVrt

State officials have confirmed the first case of Zika virus in New Hampshire.

A New Hampshire woman got Zika from having sex with a partner who had traveled to a country where the virus is being transmitted by mosquitos. The state says she's now in good health.

Still, officials are reminding people of Zika's potential danger to pregnant women because the virus is feared to cause birth defects.

EEE Claims Second Life In N.H.

Oct 15, 2014
Mr.Ripp

State health officials say a New Hampshire resident has died from Eastern Equine Encephalitis, or EEE.

The Manchester resident was likely exposed to EEE in August, then passed away in September. This is the second EEE-related death and the third human case of EEE this year.

The virus spreads from birds to humans through mosquito bites. Symptoms come on like the flu, then in some people lead to encephalitis, or severe brain swelling.