National Security

Kartik Anand via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/aEZrQN

Homegrown terrorism, gun violence, Zika - there's plenty of real stuff to get freaked out about. So can America be 100% safe?  No, says a security expert slash mom, and your kids know it's not. But that's ok. Today, a former homeland security big wig refuses to be ruled by paranoia and offers tips on how to prepare your family for the unknown without becoming a prepper.

Plus, the true story of humble scholars-turned-smugglers to save rare books and manuscripts from sure destruction by Al Qaeda.

security newspaper / Flickr/CC

Following the San Bernadino shooting, the FBI has scrambled to learn as much about the crime as possible. But Apple's refusal to help the bureau unlock one of the shooter's iPhones has stoked the national conversation about the role that tech companies play in national security, and the boundaries of how far law enforcement can probe.

NHPR

It’s become a common theme: voters are anxious – about national security, income inequality, and a government they see as unable to confront the country’s problems. Campaigns have tapped into these sentiments, often striking an angry tone. We’ll explore the extent of this discontent – and whether it's exceptional to this campaign season.

GUESTS:

Carly Fiorina
Allegra Boverman for NHPR

In a conversation with NHPR’s The Exchange, Republican presidential candidate and former technology executive Carly Fiorina called for a more aggressive response when other countries wage cyberattacks on the United States.

Syrian Revolution Memory Project / Flickr/CC

Following the Paris Attacks, many politicians including in New Hampshire, are calling for a pause on Syrian and Iraqi refugees coming to the U.S.  This has led to a huge conversation - about American values, where the real risks are, and what the next steps should be.

    

Guests:

As the U.S. emerges from a decade of war and a Great Recession, defense expert and former Reagan Pentagon official Lawrence Korb says we can and should cut our military spending. We’ll get his ideas on how to do so as the country faces evolving threats, including nuclear proliferation, cyber-attacks, and new faces of terrorism. Today we talk to Lawrence Korb about how he says you do national security and foreign policy on a budget.

Guest

As the U.S. emerges from a decade of war and a Great Recession, defense expert and former Reagan Pentagon official Lawrence Korb says we can and should cut our military spending. We’ll get his ideas on how to do so as the country faces evolving threats, including nuclear proliferation, cyber-attacks, and new faces of terrorism. Today we talk to Lawrence Korb about how he says you do national security and foreign policy on a budget.

Guest

Fifty years after the Cuban Missile Crisis, National Security expert, Tim Naftali examines how Presidents facing extreme global crises have handled them and how their approach has changed, given new technology, and a twenty-four hour news cycle.  We’ll look back a half-century ago...through current concerns about Iran and Syria.

Guest

America’s war on tourists. Since 9/11, increased security measures and visa restrictions have made travel to the US an increasing hassle. Earlier this month, President Obama announced plans to attract twice as many tourists to America in the next decade. He projected that the initiative would add two-to- three million jobs and result in $250 billion in revenue by the end of 2021. Matthew Yglesias is on board.

In a courtroom at Guantanamo Bay on Wednesday, the man accused of masterminding the bombing of the USS Cole in 2000, Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri, is expected to testify about the more than four years he spent in secret CIA prisons. Al-Nashiri is one of three terrorism suspects the U.S. government has admitted to waterboarding, so his testimony could be explosive. And that's why, critics argue, the government is trying to ensure that al-Nashiri's testimony be heard in secret.

The chief prosecutor for the military commissions at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, is arguing a difficult case: that the commissions are not only fair, but can take pride of place alongside the civilian criminal justice system.

Brig. Gen. Mark Martins is the chief prosecutor for the commissions, the courts at the naval base that try high-profile terrorism suspects.

He has been called Guantanamo's detox man largely because he has made it his mission to show that the military commissions system at Guantanamo is no longer a toxic version of victor's justice.

Romney, GOP Pounce On Obama's Russia Comment

Mar 27, 2012

President Obama went to South Korea to talk about nuclear security, only to find that the presidential campaign followed him there.

Obama is now facing sharp criticism from Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney and other GOP figures following comments he made Monday, in seeming confidence, to Russian President Dmitry Medvedev.

As reporters gathered for a news conference in Seoul, South Korea, Obama leaned over to his Russian counterpart. Without realizing a microphone was open, he said:

There has been a subtle shift taking place in the intelligence community in recent months.

Intelligence and law enforcement officials say analysts and experts who have been tracking al-Qaida for more than a decade have been quietly reassigned. Some are being moved completely out of al-Qaida units. Others are being asked to spend less time watching al-Qaida and more time tracking more traditional foes — like state-sponsored terrorists.

Consider what Hurricane Katrina did to New Orleans, and you get an idea of the consequences of a cyberattack on critical U.S. infrastructure: No electricity. No water. No transportation. Terrorists or enemy adversaries with computer skills could conceivably take down a power grid, a nuclear station, a water treatment center or a chemical manufacturing plant.

The Defense Department is bracing for billions of dollars in budget cuts — and that has defense contractors looking for new markets. Homeland Security is one of the most promising, particularly border security, which hasn't suffered any big cuts. So companies are lining up in hopes of landing a contract.

At a border security trade show in Phoenix, Ariz., there's enough surveillance equipment on the floor of the convention center to spot a federal appropriation from 5 miles away.

Here are two things you don't often hear mentioned in the same sentence: social media and nuclear weapons.

Rose Gottemoeller, acting undersecretary of state for arms control, quickly links those two unlikely partners in conversation. She's behind a campaign to discover how new communications tools can help rid the world of some of the dangers of nuclear weapons.

Crowdsourcing Nuclear Problems

Gottemoeller is an avid user of Twitter, and it made her wonder how Twitter and other methods of crowdsourcing a problem can help her in her work.