Nature

Something Wild
12:00 am
Fri September 12, 2014

Something Wild: Goldfinches, The Late Nesters

American Goldfinch
Credit jjjj56cp via flickr Creative Commons

The bird world quiets down by late summer - but not the American goldfinch, one of the most common backyard birds. September brings the chatter of young goldfinches as they follow their male parent. They beg noisily, perched with head thrown back and trembling wings.

Most songbirds switch their diet to high-protein insects when feeding their young, and they nest earlier when insects are most bountiful. For example, chickadees that keep bird-feeders busy in winter disappear in summer as they forage for insects not birdseed.

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Education
3:27 pm
Mon August 25, 2014

Four New Charter Schools Set To Open In New Hampshire

A new student scrambles trough the woods.
Credit Mountain Village Charter School

Most students across New Hampshire return to school this week, including students at Mountain Village Charter School in Plymouth. The school is one of the state’s four new charter schools opening this fall.

The actual building for Mountain Village Charter School is still under construction. So for the first week, the school’s 38 elementary students will be outside.

Teachers lead the students through a Swahili song and have them bark like dogs - mostly as a way to start the school year on a fun note.

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Word of Mouth
1:59 pm
Tue July 29, 2014

Archeological Treasures In Southern New Hampshire: America's Stonehenge

Molly Donahue

One of New Hampshire’s long-time treasures is America’s Stonehenge, an archeological site in North Salem. Opened under the name Mystery Hill Caves in 1958, the site received its current name in the 1980s to distinguish it from more geological sites. Whatever you call it, it’s a New Hampshire classic.  

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Word of Mouth
1:25 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

7.23.14: N.H.'s Hidden Treasures, Casual Dining Wars, And Gross America

Credit vixyao via Flickr CC

New Hampshire bills itself as having a terrain for all seasons – the mountains offer climbing and skiing, the forests shelter innumerable hiking trails, and the lakes and rivers draw people in summer and winter alike. We speak with Lucie Bryar about some the state’s best spots for exploring. And, casual dining chains have been experimenting in extreme discounts. We take a look at the logic behind it and speak with one reporter who put these policies to the test. Then, in case you’ve run out of vacation ideas, we have a list of America’s ickiest attractions.

Listen to the full show and Read more for individual segments.


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Something Wild
9:00 am
Fri July 11, 2014

A Salute To Bobolinks & Henry David Thoreau

Male bobolink
Kelly Colgan Azar via flickr Creative Commons

A tumbling jumble of bird song from across the field announces the presence of bobolinks. In his journals, Henry David Thoreau quoted a Cape Cod child who asked:

"What makes he sing so sweet, Mother? Do he eat flowers?"

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Word of Mouth
12:00 pm
Sat June 28, 2014

6.28.14: Summer Is Here, Get Outside!

Hiking "The Beehive" in July at Acadia National Park
Credit Logan Shannon / NHPR

So long spring, hello summer! Today on Word of Mouth, we head to the great outdoors, starting with the American playground, and how it’s evolved from a place of physical challenges to ultra-safe environment with short slides, and all soft surfaces. Then we’ll hit a different kind of playground for New Hampshire scavengers: the transfer station, or as it known in less polite circles, the dump.


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Word of Mouth
1:18 pm
Thu June 19, 2014

6.19.14: Bonobos, Granite State Music Festival, And Found Footage

Credit Mark Dumont via Flickr Creative Commons

There’s a film festival coming to New Hampshire, but it’s not what you might expect. Instead of featuring independent films by aspiring artists, this festival will screen videos that have been stuffed into storage bins and garbage cans. Today we have a conversation with the curators of the Found Footage Festival. But first, biologist Frans de Waal on altruism, empathy, kindness and ethics among bonobo chimps. Plus, we catch you up with the Granite State Music Festival, coming to Concord this weekend.

Listen to the whole show and click Read more for individual segments.


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Something Wild
12:41 am
Fri May 30, 2014

The 'Dirt' On Soil

Credit NRCS Soil Health via flickr Creative Commons

This time of year finds a lot of people working in their gardens. Good gardeners pay attention to their soil.Just like above ground, there’s a diverse world of wildlife below ground competing for space, nutrients, and performing roles that support life on Earth.

Microscopic bacteria species by the millions; root fungi that deliver nutrients to plants; worms, ants and other insects aerating the soil and adding nutrients through their droppings and—post mortem—as their bodies decay. Minerals laid down long ago are constantly breaking down through weather and erosion.

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Something Wild
9:28 am
Fri May 23, 2014

Water In The Trees

A yellow birch "leaking" water.
Credit Dave Anderson

The patter of rain. Fingers of wind comb the canopy of tender leaves. These are exotic sounds of the new tree canopy in late May. New Hampshire forests are adapted to withstand rigors of wind and weather. Leaf structures reflect inner tree plumbing we rarely consider.

Tubes of the water-moving "xylem" are coiled like springs that stretch and recoil to some degree and not break the tension of water in these drinking straws.  Stem fibers of differing lengths break at different stress points

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Something Wild
5:57 am
Fri May 9, 2014

Favorite Phoebe Nest

Old Phoebe nest.
Dave Anderson

A little phoebe nest is tucked beneath the rafters in my backyard woodshed like a miniature wreath. It’s a curious little relic to behold during those long, cold snowy weeks of hauling winter cordwood. By May, it once more cradles eggs and tiny nestlings.

The elegant little nest cup is woven of green moss, lined with pine needles and dried grass and cemented with warm mud. During winter, that Phoebe’s nest carries the promise of time travel to these fleeting mornings of early May when warm sunshine drenches the Lane River Valley - already now awash in spring bird songs.

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Word of Mouth
1:44 pm
Wed May 7, 2014

Human Behavior In Bonobos

Alaina Abplanalp Photography via flickr Creative Commons

Frans de Waal is a distinguished biologist, university professor, and author who specializes in primate social behavior. For years, he’s been bucking prevailing ideas about the nature of human morality and ethics. Over decades of research, he’s found evidence of altruistic and empathic behavior in a number of species, concluding that there is a biological foundation for human morality that emerged from our animal origins.

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Word of Mouth
2:49 pm
Tue April 29, 2014

Slideshow: Ansel Adams' Wilderness, Transfer Station Gold & Playgrounds

Peter Essick / Ansel Adams' Wilderness

The outdoors have provided wonder and fascination for millennia. Ansel Adams captured this in his photographs. Playgrounds have inspired this in children the world over. Even transfer stations, what many people mistakenly think are the last stop for the worn out, run down and used, are full of treasures. You just have to know how to look.

Word of Mouth
2:08 pm
Tue April 29, 2014

4.29.14: The Great Outdoors

Credit solidether via flickr Creative Commons

"Look deep, deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better." - Albert Einstein, 1951

Ah, the great outdoors. A place for life, death, and seemingly infinite inspiration. Today's Word of Mouth is all about the outdoors: capturing its beauty through photography, creating its beauty through manipulation, and rediscovering its beauty in the most unlikely places. Join us for a walk through the wild then share your thoughts on our Facebook and Twitter.

To see a slideshow inspired by today's show, click here

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

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Something Wild
12:00 am
Fri February 28, 2014

In Appreciation Of Winter

Credit Judy van der Velden via flickr Creative Commons

Wait! Don't wish this winter away...not yet.

Before dirty, old snow banks rot and melt onto sun-warmed pavement; before sweet steam of maple sugaring or green thoughts at St. Patrick's Day; remember one perfect day, when winter took your breath away.

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Something Wild
12:26 am
Fri January 10, 2014

NH Has Got Stones!

The Madison Boulder in Madison, NH is one of the largest known "glacial erratics" in North America.
Credit davidburn via Flickr/Creative Commons

Winter's transparent landscape offers a great opportunity for boulder appreciation. And New Hampshire has a lot of big ones, deposited by glacier action over 10,000 years ago. As the ice sheet advanced south, at it's glacial pace, it fractured and plucked many large boulders rights off mountain tops. When the glacier eventually receded, it left behind billions of these "glacial boulders." 

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Something Wild
12:46 am
Fri December 27, 2013

State Fern Nominee?

  New Hampshire's a state insect, the ladybug was nominated by persuasive Concord fifth graders; the pumpkin is our state fruit courtesy of some persuasive Harrisville third and fourth graders. I'd like to plant a seed—or perhaps a spore—for nomination of rock polypody as our state fern. Here's the case.

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Word of Mouth
11:59 am
Wed September 18, 2013

Move Over Superman: These Animals Are Real-Life Superheroes

The Dragon millipede can shoot toxic clouds of almond-smelling cyanide gas.
Credit via ecologypad.com

As the curtain falls on another season of superhero blockbusters, Hollywood is already hard at work re-booting  "Batman," "Captain America," and the "Fantastic Four" franchises.  More than sixty high-profile superhero films have been released since the surprise success of "X-Men" in the year 2000.

Joe Hanson points us to a more enduring source of awe-inspiring acts: nature. Hanson is a biologist who writes and hosts the PBS. video series “It’s Okay to Be Smart.”

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Giving Matters
12:00 am
Sat August 17, 2013

The Fight For Frisky Hill

Credit Gilmanton Land Trust

On her commute from Laconia to Pittsfield six days a week, Tobi Gray Chassie often stops at scenic spot in Gilmanton called Frisky Hill. When Chassie saw a sign telling of plans to develop the land, she felt that it was her duty to support the Gilmanton Land Trust in their protection of the land which meant so much to her.

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Giving Matters
12:00 am
Sat August 3, 2013

Children Learn To Be Good Stewards Of The Great Bay

Great Bay Discovery Center in Greenland, N.H. April 8, 2013.
Cheryl Senter

The Great Bay Stewards work to preserve and protect the Great Bay estuary through education, land protection and research. Sharon Musselman, one of the educators, is recently a retired teacher who often brought her own classes here to explore this ecosystem.

"I'm excited to be here at Great Bay Discover center," Musselman said. "I brought my first grade class to Great Bay for 15 years because it is such a great experience for first graders."

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The Exchange
9:00 am
Mon July 29, 2013

Concerns About N.H.'s Moose Population

Long before Bullwinkle, has the moose been an iconic favorite in the state. In fact, naturalists for years have referred to them as 'charismatic megafauna'.  But recently the numbers of these gentle giants have reduced, some blame disease, others climate change. Now the state is doling out nearly $700.00 to tag and study the antlered animal. Today we learn more about the moose and what's being done to bring its numbers back.

Guests:

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Word of Mouth
2:30 pm
Tue June 25, 2013

Gold Panning the Wild Ammonoosuc

Arthur gets his wetsuit on
Sean Hurley

There’s buried treasure in the rivers and streams of New Hampshire.  22 carat gold to be precise. While it’s very high quality, it’s also very low quantity.  Experienced New Hampshire prospectors say that even though there isn’t much to find, it’s not hard to find.  But you have to know where to look and how to find it as Sean Hurley reports from the gold-speckled Wild Amonoosuc River in Bath. 

The Wild Ammonoosuc River trickles to life in Kinsman Notch and rushes for 15 miles from Woodstock to Bath before breaking into the bigger, slower glass of the Ammonoosuc.  

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Word of Mouth
11:32 am
Tue June 4, 2013

Cicadas Aren't The Only Creatures With Bizarre Life Cycles

Credit mark i geo via flickr Creative Commons

You’ve likely heard about the seventeen-year cicada, last seen when the Macarena was popular. Long before the insects began to poke out of the ground along the east coast, the species was making headlines for its wacky life cycle. Nature has plenty of examples of biological oddities… science journalist Brandon Keim compiled a list of nature’s strangest life-cycles for Wired magazine.

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EarthTalk
12:00 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Nature Photography: Good Or Bad For The Environment?

Credit iStock Photo

EarthTalk®
E - The Environmental Magazine

Dear EarthTalk: Is nature photography good or bad for the environment? – Cal Moss, Camden, ME

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EarthTalk
12:00 am
Sun April 14, 2013

Getting Kids Outside To Appreciate Nature

Credit iStock Photo

EarthTalk®
E - The Environmental Magazine

 

Dear EarthTalk: My kids just want to play videos games and watch TV all day. Do you have any tips for getting them outside to appreciate nature more?-- Sue Levinson, Bowie, MD

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Word of Mouth
1:11 pm
Thu April 11, 2013

Nature Schools

Credit nicoleta gramada via flickr Creative Commons

President Obama’s newly unveiled budget is making political waves…he’s pushing for publicly funded “preschool for all,” paid for with a new tax on cigarettes. Here in New Hampshire, there’s been a different kind of preschool push…toward teaching kids outside. So-called nature preschools and forest kindergartens may sound like more fun than foundational, but this approach to early learning is gaining popularity for teaching the basics, while getting kids away from screens into the wilderness.

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Arts & Culture
6:00 pm
Sun February 10, 2013

A Walk In The Woods

Trail beside Smarts Brook
Sean Hurley for NHPR

Sometimes, to make a surprising discovery, all you've got to do is strap on your snowshoes and step outside. That was the case when correspondent Sean Hurley ventured out to some familiar trails this past week:

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Something Wild
8:00 am
Fri December 28, 2012

Crossbills Coming to NH?

The Red Crossbill.

A poor cone crop in Canada this year is driving crossbills south of the border in search of food.

As volunteers fan out across the state for the annual Christmas Bird Count, they’re likely to see two noteworthy species down from the north this year. Both are named "Crossbills" for unique bills that actually do cross, all the better to pry seeds from a conifer cone.

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Environment
12:00 am
Fri November 30, 2012

Birds of a Feather

Ken Sturm/USFWS

Taxonomy is the attempt to place all plant and animal species in a logical order based on relationship. Two thousand years ago. Aristotle classified birds by appearance and behavior, such as birds that swim, birds of prey, and birds that sing.

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Something Wild
12:00 am
Fri October 5, 2012

Thoreau Remembered

Henry David Thoreau's death 150 years ago has inspired memorial events in Concord - the Massachusetts Concord - but Thoreau passed through our Concord on a trip by boat and foot that led to his first book.

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Something Wild
12:00 am
Fri September 21, 2012

Goldfinches, The Late Nesters

Courtesy byard via Flickr/Creative Commons

The bird world quiets down by late summer - but not the American goldfinch, one of the most common backyard birds. September brings the chatter of young goldfinches as they follow their male parent. They beg noisily, perched with head thrown back and trembling wings.

Most songbirds switch their diet to high-protein insects when feeding their young, and they nest earlier when insects are most bountiful. For example, chickadees that keep bird-feeders busy in winter disappear in summer as they forage for insects not birdseed.

Read more

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