NH News

Jason Moon for NHPR

This weekend at the Pine Hill Cemetery in Dover, the dead will come back to life...sort of.

As part of the Woodman Museum’s "Voices from the Cemetery" event, local volunteer-actors will portray some of the famous -and infamous- Dover residents buried in the centuries-old cemetery.

NHPR’s Jason Moon caught up with the actors as they were rehearsing earlier this week and sends this postcard.

Bill via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/2kFWk

One of New Hampshire's most sought-after animals is the moose - a giant mammal somehow able to straddle the line between majestic, and absurd-looking, with big blunt noses and comparatively spindly legs.

But beloved or not, moose aren't always easy to spot. This story from our Only in NH series sets out to answer questions submitted by listeners. This one is from Sean, who asks “Where is the best place to look for moose?”

Producer Taylor Quimby is on the case.

  The Boy Scouts' move to admit girls throughout its ranks is fracturing a mostly cordial coexistence with the Girl Scouts and will escalate competition between the iconic youth groups.

The Girl Scouts say they've known for months that the Boy Scouts were considering opening their ranks to girls. A representative from the Girl Scouts of the Green and White Mountains said the two organizations could have better cooperated before such a step. 

Eversource announced it will sell its electricity generating stations in New Hampshire for nearly $260 million.

 

This comes after a 20-year process and 2015 agreement to deregulate the state's energy industry.

 

As NHPR's Sam Evans-Browns reports, Eversource's dams, hydro-facilities and fossil fuel plants will be owned by private companies - which will then sell the energy on the open market.

 

Peter Biello / NHPR

The Bookshelf from NHPR is New Hampshire Public Radio's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State.  All Things Considered host Peter Biello features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: October 13, 2017

20 hours ago

Gov. Sununu nominates House Speaker Shawn Jasper to be the next Commissioner of Agriculture. Congresswoman Carol Shea-Porter announces she won't run for re-election, and speculation begins on who might run for the first congressional district seat. State health official say residents on public water in Merrimack and Bedford have been exposed to toxic chemicals. And the state and EPA differ on the risks posed by a superfund site in North Hampton. 


A Massachusetts state trooper accused of beating a suspect in New Hampshire following a 50-mile pursuit in 2016 has been acquitted.

A jury issued the verdict Thursday afternoon, bringing an end to the trial in Nashua. Thirty-three-year-old Joseph Flynn was found not guilty on both counts of simple assault.

Flynn's attorneys say they are grateful for the jury's decision and say Flynn will likely begin the process of being reinstated as a state trooper in Massachusetts.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

A committee appointed by Republican Gov. Chris Sununu in hopes of making New Hampshire more business-friendly is starting its work.

Sununu, who called New Hampshire a "regulatory police state" during his campaign, last month appointed a regulatory reform steering committee to conduct in-depth reviews of state regulations and recommend changes.

Don Kasak via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/6Xqtg1

The Girl Scouts of the Green and White Mountains, which covers both Vermont and New Hampshire, is responding today to questions and concerns from members and volunteers. That follows news that the Boy Scouts of America will start accepting young women, not just young men.  

In announcing the change, the Boy Scouts organization said it’s trying to make it easier for families to accommodate all their children’s activities. But Patricia Mellor, CEO of the local Girl Scout group, suggested the two organizations could have instead partnered to meet those challenges.

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

There’s a doctor in New London who’s ending her decades-long medical practice on Friday. She’s nearly 85, but her retirement is not voluntary. She says she’s being forced to shut down by a system that no longer values the type of patient-centered medicine that she practices. But the New Hampshire Board of Medicine has a different take. They’re challenging her medical decision making and other aspects of her work. 

Liberty House in Manchester has a new leader. Jeff Nelson took the reins as Executive Director of the nonprofit two months ago. Liberty House helps up to ten veterans at a time transition from homelessness to permanent housing. Nelson spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello about how Liberty House does its work and where he thinks it's going.

The Liberty House provides transitional housing for veterans, helping them out of homelessness. How great is the need for a service like this in New Hampshire?

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

After starting a first-of-its-kind lead-testing program in its schools, Claremont may soon allow parents to opt-out of the requirements. The city launched the program, which requires lead tests for all incoming kindergarten and pre-k students, this year.

Claremont is one of several high-risk communities for lead poisoning in the state, largely because of its old housing stock.

But at least one community member has raised concerns that parents can't sign a waiver to opt-out of the testing requirement, as is allowed for certain vaccinations.

Rebecca White

Richard Alan White is now long retired from his paying job--that as a security guard at Daniel Webster College. But the Manchester, New Hampshire-native is seeing his other career, that of music composer, finally gaining traction. White’s 900-page opera Hester is getting its debut Thursday in New York City.

  A Massachusetts state trooper accused of beating a suspect has testified that he was concerned about getting a non-compliant man under control and into handcuffs.

Prosecutors allege 33-year-old Joseph Flynn punched Richard Simone Jr., who was kneeling in Nashua following a two-state, 50-mile police pursuit in May 2016. Closing arguments in his trial were scheduled Wednesday.

JB The Milker / Panoramio Creative Commons

A state-owned bridge in New Hampshire is getting a new set of lights, five years after going dark.

The Scammell Bridge carries Route 4 traffic over the Bellamy River. It spans Dover and Durham.

The state had paid about $7,000 a year to light the span, but that responsibility eventually fell to Durham and Dover, where residents opposed the idea.

A Dover business, Affinity LED Lighting bought and installed 51 lights on the bridge and another, brighter light in the parking lot on the Durham side.

Railroad Crossing
Photo by Tim Cummins via Flickr Creative Commons

Aldermen in New Hampshire have approved a memorandum that will bring commuter rail services to Nashua.

The Tuesday night unanimous approval of the memorandum of understanding means the city can begin work immediately with the Rhode Island-based Boston Surface Railroad Co to create a detailed plan. The Nashua Telegraph reports the plan says it will create a train service connecting Bedford and Nashua to Lowell, Massachusetts.

Nashua is not liable for any of the funding for the service, though it will assist Boston Surface in looking for grants and federal loans.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

The message from the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation to expecting and new mothers struggling with addiction is simple: help is available, and more is coming.

The Foundation on Tuesday announced a new three-year $3 million grant program, courtesy of an anonymous donor, that will help fund both residential and outpatient programs in the state that support mothers and their babies affected by substance misuse.

Meredith Lee/Humane Society of the U.S.

A Wolfeboro woman accused of animal cruelty will not get her dogs back before trial.

In a story that garnered national attention, 75 European Great Danes were removed from the home of Christina Fay in June.

Peter Biello / NHPR

Look at portraits of the nation's leaders and you'll see a particular trend come and go over the years: facial hair. For decades facial hair is in, and then, suddenly, for decades more, it's out. But why? Granite Geek David Brooks recently noticed this pattern in the photographs of the mayors of Concord, which are displayed along several flights of stairs at City Hall, and he says a particular invention may have something to do with the trend. He spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

The state of New Hampshire is going after a high-level drug dealer out of Lawrence accused of causing the death of a Rochester resident.

This is the first time local law enforcement has brought charges against someone out of state in connection with a New Hampshire drug overdose death. 

Peter Biello / NHPR

Last week's mass shooting in Las Vegas has prompted what seems to be the perennial discussion of gun control. Steve Marchand, a Democrat running for governor and former mayor of Portsmouth, says politicians should be ready to talk about guns and legislate if necessary.

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

Keene State College is partnering with the Auschwitz Institute for Peace and Reconciliation in New York to welcome a visiting international scholar focusing on genocide studies this fall.  Hikmet Karcic is on campus through December and will speak on the Bosnian genocide at  Keene's public library on Thursday.

Karcic, from the city of Sarajevo in Bosnia and Herzegovina, is working toward a PhD on the use of concentration camps in his country in the 90s.

Millyard800 / Wikimedia Commons

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire will spend the next year developing a program to train  students on how to respond to peers when told about incidents of sexual violence.

www.visitnhcolleges.com

The new president of Keene State College says she is working quickly to try to right the school’s balance sheet.

The college has struggled in recent years to attract and retain students. Lower-than-expected enrollment has translated to significant declines in revenue from tuition.

This week, interim President Melinda Treadwell is launching a task force to look closely at the school’s admissions and enrollment strategy. She’ll ask that group to deliver preliminary recommendations next month.

Flickr Creative Commons / Brave Sir Robin

A Hanover planning board decision to deny a new athletic facility for Dartmouth College may be headed to the state’s highest court.

The board voted last year to deny a permit for the controversial nearly $18 million, 70,000-square-foot building. Dartmouth says it needs the space for athletes to practice in the winter. But local residents oppose it citing the building’s size and appearance and concerns about noise and light. 

Dartmouth argues those standards are subjective, but a Grafton superior court judge upheld the planning board’s decision last month.

bwats2 / Flickr Creative Commons

Organizers of Keene’s pumpkin festival have met their funding goal, but they are still soliciting donations for the event.

The festival once drew thousands to the area breaking world records for the most jack-o-lanterns in one place, but this is the first year it’s returning since 2014. That’s when riots broke out involving students at Keene State College.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

Increased regulation of so-called “bump stocks” seems to have earned initial buy-in from gun rights and gun control activists alike in the aftermath of the Las Vegas massacre. Authorities say the shooter may have used this kind of device to make his gun function more like an automatic weapon.

Here in New Hampshire, at least one local gun shop owner says he doesn't plan on selling the devices — despite a noticeable uptick in demand in recent days. 

UPDATE: An off-duty police officer from Somerville, Mass., has died from injuries sustained when another vehicle struck his motorcycle Sunday on Interstate 95 in North Hampton, N.H.

State Police said Officer Louis Remigio, 55, died Monday night. 

An 18-year-old driver who police say was racing other vehicles at the time of the crash is now facing charges. Police say that a northbound 2013 Mercedes-Benz C300 driven by Michael Ricci, of Burlington, Mass., traversed into the southbound lanes before colliding with Remigio's Harley-Davidson.

Ken Watson / kenwatson.net

Fire officials say rain this weekend is keeping a 70-acre forest fire from growing in the White Mountains.

Spokesperson Dee Hines said firefighters have been pulled from the location due to rain on Saturday and Sunday. He said as a result of the rain and higher humidity, there was a decrease in fire behavior, allowing firefighters to make good progress.  

The fire that started last week on a cliff in Kinsman Ridge over the Lost River Gorge continues to be closely monitored. 

New Hampshire House Minority Leader Steve Shurtleff, D-Concord, says he is going to introduce a bill to ban so-called "bump stocks" similar to what the Las Vegas shooter is reported to have used.

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