NH News

The city of Manchester is paying $275,000 to settle a civil lawsuit after a man was arrested for taking a video recording of police.

The ACLU of New Hampshire brought the civil rights case on behalf of Alfredo Valentin, who was arrested in March of 2015 after using his phone to record the actions of Manchester police in a public space. Though Valentin did not interfere with the police activities, officers arrested and charged him with criminal wiretapping.

After being halted for nearly a year, construction of two aircraft hangars at the Pease Air National Guard Base is set to resume next month.

Work on the hangars stopped in December 2016 when the New Hampshire National Guard terminated the nearly $32 million contract with Cutter Enterprises, LLC of Connecticut for what officials say were problems with the quality of the work and failure to make sufficient progress.

Chris Jensen / NHPR

New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu has requested a major disaster declaration and federal emergency assistance for five counties following an October storm that caused widespread damage and power outages.

The combination of heavy rainfall and damaging winds caused severe damages to hundreds of miles of local and state roadways and dozens of bridges and culverts in New Hampshire Oct. 29-Oct. 30. The high winds damaged many trees and power lines, disrupting electricity to approximately 270,000 customers.

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Keene State College will offer buyouts to faculty and staff as part of ongoing efforts to cut costs. The college may also look at layoffs in early 2018, said Interim President Melinda Treadwell.

Enrollment declines have fueled Keene State's recent financial struggles. The college relies heavily on tuition income for its operating budget. 

On October 9th, 2015, a man named Feky Sumual walks into Stateline Guns, Ammo & Archery, a gun shop in Plaistow, New Hampshire, where he buys seven 9-millimeter handguns.

Because of the number of guns involved, and because 9-millimeters are common in gun smuggling rings, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms begins to investigate.

Dozens of Indonesians fighting deportation from the United States have won another temporary reprieve in federal court in Boston.

U.S. District Court Judge Patti Saris on Monday rejected the government's argument the court doesn't have jurisdiction in the case. The judge is blocking immigration officials from removing the roughly 50 Indonesians living in New Hampshire while the court considers their bid for a preliminary injunction.

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

A judge in Merrimack County Superior Court has dismissed a case brought by a New London doctor who said she was forced to close her practice under pressure from the state.

Dr. Anna Konopka agreed to surrender her license this fall to settle allegations from the New Hampshire Board of Medicine. The details of those allegations are sealed, but Konopka admits she failed to use an online database required for doctors prescribing opioids. In her mid-80s, Konopka does not use a computer.

Doug Kerr/Flickr

Members of the Executive Council could vote next week on the first broad increase in the state’s highway tolls in more than a decade. The plan would spare in-state commuters the brunt of the hikes.

Under a proposal, the cash toll rate on I-93 in Hooksett would go from $1.00 to $1.50. On the Spaulding Turnpike, the Dover and Rochester tolls would rise to $1.00 from $0.75. In Hampton, the Interstate 95 toll would increase from $2.00 to $2.50.

Jack Rodolico/NHPR

A group of Manchester residents exposed to elevated levels of lead dust has reached a settlement with property developer Brady Sullivan.

Several dozen residents of the Mill West apartment complex in Manchester sued Brady Sullivan, contending that the company’s construction project in 2015 in lower levels of the mill building kicked up dangerous levels of lead-dust into luxury apartments on higher floors.

They also say Brady Sullivan, after making complaints about the lead exposure, would not let them out of their leases.

Dan Tuohy/NHPR

When Lorraine Stuart Merrill was nominated as Agriculture Commissioner in 2007, the first reporter to get her on the phone asked her how it felt to take the job when farming was all but disappearing in the state.

That wasn't the case then - and it isn't now. There's something of a boomlet going on, she says. But for Merrill it showed that she had her work cut out for her in terms of public perception.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

A group of animal rights activists gathered at a busy intersection near the New Hampshire fish and game headquarters in Concord on Friday to protest fur trapping — and, with the holiday shopping season kicking into gear, to send a message against buying goods made from fur.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

To compete with the Walmarts of this world, small businesses have to offer something the retail giants can't. For Joe Galvin, that’s an impressive collection of well-used vintage vinyl.

“We sell the old scratched up stuff...has some flavor to it,” he says with a laugh.

Galvin runs the Krypton Pop Culture Emporium in downtown Exeter. Along with records, he’s got comic books, GI Joe toys from the 1960s, and all manner of pop memorabilia.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

The burned out shell of Lemay and Sons’ slaughtering facility still sits untouched, the charred studs visible like a rack of overcooked ribs.

On October 6th, a fire ripped through the main production building of this family-run business, where locally raised cows and pigs have been turned into beef and bacon since 1963. No one was hurt in the fire, and no cause has yet been determined.

Rick Lemay, youngest of six and current operator of the business, says since the fire, he’s felt and seen an unexpected outpouring of support from the community.

NHPR File

With New Hampshire still in opioid crisis mode, Chris Hickey says part of the challenge continues to be fighting the stigma around drug addiction.

Hickey is the firefighter behind the Manchester Fire Department's "Safe Station," a program that welcomes addicts and directs them to available drug and substance abuse treatment and recovery services.

Peter Biello / NHPR

Ernest Hebert is best known for his novels. His first book, The Dogs of March, was published in 1979 and cited for excellence by the Hemingway Foundation. It was the first of seven novels in his Darby Chronicles series, which painted a vivid portrait of working class life in rural New Hampshire. 

(Scroll down to the end to read Ernest Hebert's top five reading recommendations.)

Considering the circumstances, the alleged criminal remained remarkably stoic, barely flapping a feather as he stood at the front of the council chambers on Wednesday while Gov. Chris Sununu and Attorney General Gordon MacDonald presented the facts of his case.

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A New Hampshire company that makes gear for firefighters has announced it's giving away complete new sets to volunteer fire departments in other states. 

Globe Manufacturing Company is headquartered in Pittsfield. It has a plant there that makes turnout gear, the heavy coats and pants that protect firefighters. 

Sean Hurley

The Dilly Fire in North Woodstock burned for 36 days, closed two popular hiking trails, cost a little more than a half a million dollars and involved more than a hundred people.  The fire grabbed headlines while it burned - but NHPR’s Sean Hurley wondered what happens next?

Firefighter Jeff Parker struggles down the icy Dilly Cliffs path dragging a hundred foot section of stiff hose behind him.  

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Southern New Hampshire University continues to reinvent itself. At the beginning of the decade it had 2,000 students and shaky finances. Today, it serves more than 80,000 students online and 3,000 on campus, making it one of the country's fastest-growing universities.

This week it continues that expansion with the announcement of a major infrastructure project in Manchester.

The Keene Public Library is hosting an immigration-related event Thanksgiving morning. 

Organizer Mohammed Saleh hopes locals will take a moment to step away from their celebrations and reflect on how other families might be separated on this day.

It only made sense to choose Thanksgiving, he said, as a day that recognizes the coexistence of immigrants and natives.

City officials in Portsmouth have upheld a decision to prohibit a couple from renting out a second home through AirBnB.

Portsmouth couple Matthew Beebe and Barbara Jenny bought the house next door with the intention that one day their daughter will live in it.

In the meantime, they planned to rent out the house through AirBnB. But before they got the chance, the city served them with a cease-and-desist letter.

The city says the home, which is in a residentially zoned area, can’t be used for short-term rentals without a special exemption.

A 27-year-old Hopkinton woman was shot by a hunter in Elm Brook park, according to N.H. Fish and Game officials.

The shooting happened at approximately 4:20 pm Tuesday while the woman was mountain biking on an Army Corps of Engineers access road in a wooded area of the park.

The victim received non-life threatening injuries and was treated and released from Concord Hospital.

Scroll down to read the full statement from N.H. Fish and Game.

NH Division of Forests and Lands

Governor Chris Sununu and Vermont Governor Phil Scott signed a joint letter to House and Senate leadership Monday, calling on Congress to increase funding for fighting and preventing forest fires.

“This is far from just a ‘Western’ issue,” they wrote, arguing the Forest Service is increasingly allocating its funds to fight fires at the expense of other priorities.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Think bagpipes, and you likely think Scotland. But one of the world’s largest bagpipe manufacturers happens to call Nashua, New Hampshire home.

That company, however, is facing an unexpected wrinkle in its international supply chain.

The Trump administration is ending temporary protected status for some 60,000 Haitians living in the U.S. after an earthquake devastated their country in 2010.

This affects between 80 and 150 Haitians in New Hampshire, according to Samson DuClair, president of the Haitian Community Center of N.H. He says these people are worried about being sent back, and many don’t have a home to return to.

Jason Moon for NHPR

The New Hampshire Attorney General says a Belmont police officer was justified in using deadly force during an altercation with a man in September.

The AG says the incident began when Belmont police officer Evan Boulanger approached Joseph Mazzitelli at a gas station. At the time, there was an active warrant for Mazzitelli’s arrest.

Surveillance footage from the gas station shows Mazzitelli, after speaking briefly with the officer, lunging into his car and emerging with a pistol pointed at his own head.

firstnet.gov

The First Responder Network Authority, or FirstNet, is a federal program created by Congress in 2012 in response to the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Police and fire departments were unable to communicate with each other that morning over incompatible radio systems. The FirstNet program aims to fix that with a secure communications network for first responders across all 50 states.

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

Will Coley walks through the old house in Keene he’s been renovating since September. It’s a work in progress.

He steps over rusted metal tiles and points to ceilings and walls awaiting a new coat of paint.

“This is the mosque,” he says, “this is our place to pray.”


Via UNH Wildcats website

The University of New Hampshire football team had an interesting weekend.

After getting blanked in the team’s finale on Saturday 15-0 to the Albany Great Danes, the Wildcats’ playoff hopes were in doubt. The team finished with a 7-4 regular season record, and would need to earn an at-large invitation to compete in the Football Championship Subdivision tournament.

  The New Hampshire Attorney General's office says a Manchester man has died from wounds connected to a Goffstown shooting incident Sunday.

The AG continues to investigate what it's calling a homicide, following an autopsy Monday.

Authorities reporting to the scene Sunday found Ian Jewell, 18, of Manchester, wounded. He was taken to a local hospital where he later died from a single gunshot wound to the chest.

There is no known threat to the public.

 

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