NH News

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

A line of people stretched outside Joey's Diner in Amherst Thursday morning ahead of Scott Walker's first New Hampshire campaign event in more than a month. 

monadnocktrails.com

 

A volunteer effort to restore and maintain hiking trails on Mount Monadnock is celebrating its 10th year.

Volunteers are welcome to participate for one day or several during Monadnock Trails Week from July 17 to July 21. Complimentary camping is available at the Monadnock State Park campground.

This year's projects include constructing new stone stairs on the Pumpelly Trail; upgrading erosion control areas on the White Dot Trail; and adding footbridges and drainage on the Gilson Pond Loop and Birchtoft Trail.

Flickr user decaturshooter

 

A municipal employee can no longer fly a Confederate flag from his pickup truck while on town property.

Canaan Town Administrator Mike Samson said he instructed J.R. Defosse, a transfer station manager, to take down his flag. He said the flag has been associated with resisting desegregation for decades.

File photos / NHPR

 

New Hampshire senators Jeanne Shaheen and Kelly Ayotte are supporting a rewrite of the education law known as No Child Left Behind that aims to give power back to the states.

They joined 79 other senators Thursday in passing the bill. Both say it will help restore local control in education. The senators also supported amendments to better promote science, technology, engineering and math education and to address mental health and substance abuse issues.

Michael Brindley for NHPR

A celebration is planned for Saturday at the Old Allenstown Meeting House to celebrate the building’s 200th anniversary.

It will also be the first open house at the building in a decade, which has been closed while restoration efforts were underway.

A fire in 1985 caused significant damage to the building’s roof and several pews. The restoration cost nearly $200,000, a project paid for through private donations and grants.

biologycorner / Flickr Creative Commons

Governor Hassan signed House Bill 323 into law Wednesday, giving schools the choice to give the SAT or ACT to high school juniors in order to meet federal testing requirements.

Previously, all students in the state were required to take the Smarter Balanced Assessment to meet the requirements of No Child Left Behind. 

File Photo

The state Department of Health and Human Services says it's still determining if it can proceed with another round of blood tests for people exposed to contaminants at Pease International Tradeport in Portsmouth. 

Flickr/mo1229

The cost of a license to hunt and fish in New Hampshire would increase next year under a draft proposal outlined Wednesday by the Fish and Game Department.

Under the proposal, a resident fishing license for all species would go from $33 to $38. Hunting licenses for New Hampshire residents would from $21 to $30. And a combination hunting and fishing license would go from $44 to $56.

Officials say the increases are needed to fill a $1.1 million revenue gap.

.imelda/Flickr

By all indications, Market Basket is surging after last summer’s unrest sparked by the firing of CEO Arthur T. Demoulas.

The New England-based supermarket chain is projecting $4.8 billion in sales this year, up from $4 billion last year. And the company is expanding, with a new Market Basket under construction in Rochester.

But one unique aspect of the company is its complete lack of an online presence.

Paige Sutherland for NHPR

It was a quiet summer night in June when EMTs in Laconia got the call of a possible overdose at a nearby house.

When they arrived, they were brought to a bedroom with posters on the wall, laundry spread on the floor and a snowboard laid up against a dresser. 

Peter Biello / NHPR

New Hampshire's Department of Health and Human Services plans to add 11 positions to help community mental health centers understand military culture. But these eleven workers can’t start until a new state budget is in place—something that has been delayed by partisan fighting.

These workers will be called “community mental health center military culture liaisons.” Ten of them will work part-time at mental health centers throughout the state. The eleventh will work statewide.

An Alton man has sued the town’s board of selectmen and police chief after he was arrested at a meeting earlier this year for criticizing board members.

The charge of disorderly conduct against Jeffrey Clay was thrown out by a Laconia Circuit Court judge last month, calling the arrest an act of “pure censorship.”

Now, Clay is seeking damages, said Giles Bissonnette, the legal director for the New Hampshire ACLU, which filed the suit in federal court in Concord Tuesday.

www.BackgroundNow.com / Flickr/Creative Commons

Gov. Maggie Hassan has signed into law a bill meant to streamline felony cases.

Under the so-called Felonies First model, felony cases will be handled in the superior court system, instead of starting in circuit courts.

It also eliminates holding a probable cause hearing as a right. Instead, a judge will now determine if one is warranted.

The Strafford and Cheshire county superior courts will pilot the program starting in January. It will expand to Belknap County Superior Court in July of 2016.

Thomas Fearon

 

New Hampshire's Department of Health and Human Services is launching several new initiatives to help New Hampshire veterans, service members and their families receive medical and mental health treatment.

Commissioner Nick Toumpas will be joined by Department of Veterans Affairs officials, New Hampshire National Guard leaders and others from the civilian sector to describe the programs on Wednesday.

 

New Hampshire's unemployment rate held steady in June.

The state employment security office says the preliminary seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 3.8 percent in June, unchanged from the May rate and lower than the 4.3 percent unemployment rate for the same month last year.

The state estimates that 720,940 people were employed last month, an increase of 12,350 from June 2014.

Nationally, the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for June was 5.3 percent.

Ella Nilsen / NHPR

It’s now been a year since operations at the supermarket chain Market Basket, a family-owned company with 75 stores across New England, came to a standstill as employees and customers rallied in support of Arthur T. Demoulas.

He was ousted as the company’s chief executive in June of 2014.

Flikr / Cityyear

Republican Ted Gatsas filed his candidacy for a fourth term as Manchester's mayor on Monday. He joins a growing field of candidates to lead New Hampshire's biggest city.

RICH BEAUCHESNE/SEACOASTONLINE

A retired Portsmouth police officer who was placed under a gag order after talking to a local newspaper is suing the city, as well as the city’s Police Chief and Police Commission.

The police department put retired officer John Connors under a gag order almost a year ago, after he talked to the Portsmouth Herald about Detective Aaron Goodwin.

Goodwin inherited $2.7 million from an elderly Portsmouth woman who lived next door to Connors. Goodwin was fired last month after an independent investigation.  The inheritance is now pending in probate court.

Chris Jensen for NHPR

President Obama says all of Iran's pathways to a nuclear weapon are cut off under a landmark agreement announced today. 

SandJLinkins / MorgueFile

It’s July, and if you’re a gardener, that means little green tomatoes are popping up on your plants, flowers are attracting bees, and fruit trees are filling up with the beginnings of what we’ll harvest this fall. It’s also a time for deer to come by and steal a snack from your garden. David Brooks, a columnist for the Nashua Telegraph and writer at GraniteGeek.org, spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello about ways to prevent those deer from literally stealing the fruits of your labor.

What is the thing that keeps deer away?

Hannah McCarthy/NHPR

At midnight last night, 55 years after To Kill a Mockingbird was published and became an immediate success, Harper Lee’s second novel was released to the public. Gibson’s Bookstore in downtown Concord hosted a read-a-thon of the beloved novel as fans counted the hours before Go Set A Watchman went on sale. 

Craig Kohlruss/flickr

 

Concord authorities say the city is experiencing an alarming spike in methamphetamine use.

Sgt. Marc McGonagle, with the police's drug unit, tells The Concord Monitor that since January, undercover police have made at least 19 separate purchases of the narcotic.

He says the unit only made one undercover meth buy between 2003 and 2007.

McGonagle says most of the meth buys have involved people in their 30s and older.

He says that the drug is probably coming from local sources— people who are cooking it using over-the-counter ingredients.

 

Sentencing has been postponed for the cousin of one of the world's most notorious drug lords.

Jesus Gutierrez-Guzman was to be sentenced Monday in New Hampshire. The Concord Monitor reports that after a brief meeting with lawyers and a federal judge, sentencing was postponed for 45 days.

During a sting operation, Gutierrez-Guzman told FBI agents he represented his cousin, Joaquin Guzman, known as "El Chapo," leader of Mexico's violent Sinaloa cartel. Gutierrez-Guzman pleaded guilty to planning to distribute more than 1,000 kilograms of cocaine in the U.S.

 

New Hampshire lawmakers are considering how to regulate ridesharing services such as Uber.

Gov. Maggie Hassan has signed a bill to create a 5-member committee to study how Uber and taxi services are regulated statewide and nationally and to compare the safety of the services, among other things. The committee must report its finding by the beginning of November.

N.H. Fish and Game

 

State officials say a Newmarket woman injured while hiking in the White Mountains is the first person with a Hike Safe card to need rescue.

The New Hampshire Fish and Game Department says 64-year-old Deborah Bloomer hurt her ankle around noon Sunday while descending Mount Chocorua. She was met by a member of the U.S. Forest Service and slowly continued the descent with assistance.

Eventually, rescuers from the forest service, local fire departments and state conservation officers used a litter to carry her off the mountain.

Brady Carlson / NHPR

The purpose of a town hall meeting is for members of the public to ask questions and get answers from elected officials or candidates. But town halls also serve as a political symbol; those who hold them can say they’re accessible to their constituents. That's what was on Frank Guinta’s mind as he outlined a new “We the People” constituent contact system at his town hall meeting Saturday in Alton. 

 

A New Hampshire judge suspended for 60 days without pay after an angry outburst at a deputy sheriff and his related dismissal of an emergency commitment case involving a suicidal woman says he respects the disciplinary decision.

Manchester Circuit Court Judge William Lyons was also publicly censured for his misconduct and ordered to pay $30,000 to cover the cost of the investigation by the Judicial Conduct Committee.

 

The cousin of one of the world's most notorious drug lords is set to be sentenced for his role in trying to expand the violent cartel's reach in Europe and the United States.

Jesus Gutierrez-Guzman has pleaded guilty to planning to distribute more than 1,000 kilograms of cocaine in the United States. He faces at least 10 years in prison when he's sentenced Monday.

He said he represented Joaquin Guzman, known as "El Chapo," in talks with undercover FBI agents. He said the violent Sinaloa drug gang could supply thousands of kilos of cocaine.

KevinChang / Flickr

 

New Hampshire's Fish and Game Commission is meeting Wednesday to discuss potential hunting and fishing license fee increases, which haven't gone up in at least 12 years.

During the 2015 session, the state Legislature granted the department's executive director and commission the authority to set hunting and fishing license fees.

The commission is meeting at 1 p.m. at the Fish and Game Department in Concord.

NHPR Staff

It remains to be seen whether, or when, Republican lawmakers and Governor Maggie Hassan will resolve their differences on the next two year state budget.

The House and Senate are expected to return in September to consider legislation vetoed by Governor Maggie Hassan, including two budget bills.

House Speaker Shawn Jasper says lawmakers may return earlier if the state’s budget issues are resolved, but Senate Ways and Means Chair David Boutin says a deal might not come until later in the fall, because the two sides remain far apart on several issues. 

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