NH Politics

NHPR Staff

School's now in session for New Hampshire's newly elected state representatives, who are spending two days touring the State House and learning the ropes of legislative procedure.

Brady Carlson

Republican Bill O'Brien has been nominated by fellow Republicans to become the next speaker of the New Hampshire House.

O'Brien, who served as speaker from 2011 to 2012, narrowly defeated Gene Chandler – also a former house speaker -- on Tuesday.

Prior to the vote, O'Brien told the GOP caucus by working together they could “turn NH into the crown jewel of New England.”

Marc Nozell via Flickr CC

Former state Rep. Kevin Avard upset Democrat incumbent Sen. Peggy Gilmour on Tuesday, adding at least one seat to the Republican’s majority in the New Hampshire Senate. 

Avard took 50.8 percent of the 21,335 ballots cast in the District 12 contest to beat Gilmour by 323 votes. The narrow margin gives Republicans a 14-10 majority in the Senate, with at least one race that was too close to call.

In District 7, Democratic incumbent Andrew Hosmer had a lead of about 100 votes over Republican challenger Kathy Lauer-Rago.

Election Day 2014: A Look At The Issues

Nov 4, 2014
Sara Plourde / NHPR

The mid-term elections are almost but not quite over - with polls still open in some New Hampshire communities.  This hour on The Exchange, as we wait for results to come in, we’re reflecting back on some of the major themes at play in 2014. 

GUESTS:

fivethirtyeight.com

New polls out over the past few days show all four of New Hampshire's major races in the state to be too close to call. 

That might prompt us to believe that anything could happen tomorrow, but as poll watchers will tell you, any single poll is just that: a single poll.

NHPR's Brady Carlson spoke with Harry Enten, a senior political writer with FiveThirtyEight -- the politics blog that introduced many politcal watchers to predictive elections models -- about just that. 

Marc Nozell via Flickr CC

Hoping to retain the GOP’s slim majority in the state Senate, if not build on it, the New Hampshire Republican State Committee has spent tens of thousands of dollars on an advertising push over the final weeks of the campaign.

The party has focused its spending on a handful of races that could determine who takes control of the state’s upper chamber, which Republicans now control 13-11.

The NHGOP has poured a total of roughly $72,000 into two rematches from 2012 that Republicans won by the slimmest of margins.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Laura Knoy sits down with former State Representative Marilinda Garcia for an in-depth discussion about the issues on New Hampshire voters’ minds this election season. This special broadcast is a part of our election series presented in partnership with the Rudman Center at the UNH School of Law.

More information about NHPR's special election series presented with UNH Law School can be found here.

GUEST:

It’s a week to the election, and New Hampshire campaigns are focused on getting their voters to the polls. And this year, there are some powerful new players on the field.

On a crystalline fall day, two orange tee-shirted canvassers for a group called NextGen Climate Change wander the breezy backstreets of Portsmouth.

“I know exactly where we are,” says worker Andrea Harkness.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

Laura Knoy sits down with former Congresswoman Carol Shea-Porter for an in-depth discussion about the issues on New Hampshire voters’ minds this election season. This special broadcast is a part of our election series presented in partnership with the Rudman Center at the UNH School of Law.

More information about NHPR's special election series presented with UNH Law School can be found here.

GUEST:

Friday N.H. News Roundup - October 24, 2014

Oct 24, 2014
Sara Plourde / NHPR

From politics to Pumpkin Fest, we're looking at the top stories of the week: officials are still trying to figure out why mayhem erupted near Keene State College during last weekend’s Halloween festival, while candidates hashed out issues from Obamacare to energy for an intense week of debates and forums.

GUESTS:

Friday N.H. News Roundup: 2014 Election Edition

Oct 17, 2014
Sara Plourde / NHPR

A special election edition of our Friday New Hampshire News Roundup.  We’ll sit down with NPR’s senior Washington editor Ron Elving, who’s in the Granite State this week, and NHPR’s senior political reporter Josh Rogers. We’ll get their take on the midterms and how New Hampshire’s races fit into the national narrative.

GUESTS:

As Election Day draws near we’re checking in each week on political ads and ad spending with Dave Levinthal, Senior Political Reporter for the Center for Public Integrity.

Over the past week Levinthal says political ads have turned negative – really negative.

Elections 2014: Behind N.H.'s Political Ads & Polls

Oct 15, 2014
NHPR Staff/Campaigns

With their threatening music and grainy mug-shot photos, they warn of shady pasts and terrifying outcomes if a certain candidate is elected. We explore the themes presented, where the truth may or may not come in, and who’s paying for these ads.  And then, another election season pet-peeve: polls.

GUESTS:

  • Wayne Lesperance – professor of political science at New England College, and director of the Center for Civic Engagement, which includes the New England College Polling Institute.

CALLOUTS:

Alex Proimos via Flickr CC

Gov. Maggie Hassan says more than 20,000 people have signed up for health coverage under New Hampshire's newly expanded Medicaid program.

New Hampshire's previous Medicaid program covered low-income children, parents with non-disabled children under 18, pregnant women, older residents and people with disabilities. The expansion adds anyone under 65 who earns up to 138 percent of federal poverty guidelines, which is about $15,900 for a single adult.

Josh Rogers / NHPR

The race to represent New Hampshire’s 2nd Congressional District is catching fire here and nationally.

A poll last week put incumbent Rep. Anne Kuster, a first-term Democrat, behind her GOP challenger, state lawmaker Marilinda Garcia. It looks like it will be a close contest.

At 31, Marilinda Garcia would be one of the youngest members elected to the U.S. House this year. So perhaps it’s no surprise that when Garcia won the GOP congressional primary last month, a large and loud crowd of millennials was in the house.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

There’s a painted blue line surrounding the entrance to the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard. Over that blue line, political campaigning is not allowed, but just a few inches on this side of it – politics are in motion.

Over the last few months, Shipyard unions have endorsed at least five candidates, most of them Democrats. 

Boverman/Jensen for NHPR

Democratic Senator Jeanne Shaheen is making a big push for the women’s vote, which for three decades has tilted toward her party. But this year, GOP challenger Scott Brown is trying to exploit what may be a new vulnerability for Democratic candidates – women’s disenchantment with the way President Obama is handling the threat of the so-called Islamic State.

The race could come down to what’s highest on women’s minds come election day  – social and economic issues such as abortion and pay equity, or… national security.

Sam Evans-Brown

New Hampshire's gubernatorial and U.S. Senate candidates are addressing energy industry leaders, consumers and policy makers at an annual summit in Concord.

The New Hampshire Energy Summit being held Monday is organized by the Dupont Group and the New Hampshire Independent Energy Council, a coalition of non-utility electric generators, renewable generation developers, private transmission companies and electricity suppliers.

Gov. Maggie Hassan and her Republican challenger both will speak, as will U.S. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen and Republican Scott Brown.

Laura Knoy sat down with Governor Maggie Hassan for an in-depth discussion about the issues on New Hampshire voters’ minds this election season.

More information about NHPR's special election series presented with UNH Law School can be found here.

GUEST:

  • Maggie Hassan - Governor of New Hampshire

Watch the interview:

Money In Politics: N.H.'s 2014 Races

Sep 24, 2014
Martin Stelbrink / NHPR

New Hampshire politicians get their funding from the usual array of sources – from PACs, SuperPACS, and campaign contributions, to the national party, and their own pockets. We’re sitting down with three experts who have watched this year’s New Hampshire campaigns, including issues like dark money, outside spending, and special interests.

GUESTS:

N.H. Primary 2014: Who Won, Who Lost, And Why

Sep 10, 2014
Emily Corwin / NHPR

We're looking at the results from yesterday's primaries for U.S. Senate, House, N.H. Governor, and statewide offices.

GUESTS:

Sara Plourde / NHPR

We’re checking in New Hampshire’s primary races, two weeks before voting day.

GUESTS:

Catherine Gregg, the wife of one New Hampshire governor and the mother of another, has died. She was 96.  Gregg, who died Friday at her home in Exeter, was the widow of former Gov. Hugh Gregg and the mother of former Gov. Judd Gregg, who also served as a congressman and U.S. senator.  Along with her husband, she was passionate about preserving New Hampshire's first-in-the-nation presidential primary, and was heavily involved in protecting the state's environment and cultural heritage.

Hassan Vetoes Workplace Anti-Bullying Bill

Jul 28, 2014
No Bully Zone
Paul Schreiber / Flickr Creative Commons

Governor Maggie Hassan has vetoed a bill she called “well-intentioned” aimed at protecting public employees from bullying in the workplace.  

The attack ads with the cartoon sheep began airing in May, followed by the negative mailers.

Paid for by a conservative nonprofit called Citizens for a Strong New Hampshire, they targeted Republican state senators who supported Medicaid expansion and a four-cent hike in the state gas tax. According to a spokesman, it was just the beginning of the group’s efforts to “fight” for a more fiscally conservative senate.

Emily Corwin for NHPR

Top Democrats rallied volunteers and worked the phones Monday in Portsmouth. Their goal was to call attention to the US Supreme Court’s “Hobby Lobby” ruling, which found a closely held company could not be forced to pay for all birth control procedures required by the Affordable Care Act.

Democrats hope Supreme Court rulings like the Hobby Lobby and the striking down of Massachusetts’s abortion clinic buffer zone law will motivate women voters, helping the party overcome certain challenges.

Sara Plourde for NHPR

The realscottbrownrecord.com highlights what the NH PAC to Save America calls Brown’s deceptive tactic of criticizing Democrat Jeanne Shaheen for doing what he also did– support policies favored by President Obama.

Brown has made Jeanne Shaheen’s fealty to the president a key part of his campaign, but PAC adviser Mike Dennehy says Brown needs to be held to account for the fact that Congressional Quarterly found he voted with the President 78 percent of the time in 2012.

Shaheen Fires Back At Critics Over Stock Allegations

Jun 27, 2014
Austin Cowan for NHPR

U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen fired back at critics Friday, a day after her campaign said she would update her financial disclosure form to reflect that she and her husband no longer hold stock options in a California firm that received federal stimulus funding.

Shaheen says her husband, William, is no longer affiliated with Ultrawave Labs, a company developing technology to better detect breast cancer.

“I think it’s disappointing that my Republican opponents...The only thing they can find to attack me on is breast cancer research."

Sen. Jeanne Shaheen and her husband, William, earned an average of more than $472,000 a year in pre-tax income between 2006 and 2013, according to federal tax returns released by Shaheen’s campaign Tuesday.

The couple's joint returns were made available four days after Republican Senate candidate Scott Brown and his wife, Gail Huff, released eight years of joint state and federal returns. Shaheen had pledged to release her returns if her opponents did the same.

 

The state's Ballot Law Commission won't delay a hearing on the residency of Republican candidate for governor Walt Havenstein.

The New Hampshire Democratic Party said Monday that it has filed a petition challenging Havenstein's claim that he's a legal resident of New Hampshire. The party says he was a resident of Maryland in 2010 and 2011, which would disqualify him from running for office here. Candidates for governor must live in New Hampshire for at least seven years.

Havenstein said he has owned a home and voted in New Hampshire for the past 15 years.

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