NPR Blogs

The Two-Way
12:05 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

ANALYSIS: Why Is '60 Minutes' So Tight-Lipped In Its Benghazi Apology?

CBSNews.com

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 4:51 pm

(This post was updated at 4:40 p.m. ET)

How did TV's most storied newsmagazine make such a huge mistake? And why won't they explain exactly what happened?

Those are the questions left unanswered days after 60 Minutes correspondent Lara Logan and CBS News Chairman Jeff Fager retracted an Oct. 27 story about the terrorist attack on the U.S. mission in Benghazi, Libya, that featured a suspect source: government contractor Dylan Davies.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
12:00 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

Science Doesn't Want To Take God Away From You

Can science inspire the same level of passion as religion?
Mauricio Lima AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 2:01 pm

I was once invited to give a live interview on a radio station in Brasília, the capital of Brazil. The interview took place at rush hour in the city's very busy bus terminal, where poor workers come in from rural areas to perform all sorts of jobs in town, from cleaning the streets to working in factories and private homes.

The experience would mark me for the rest of my life and set a new professional goal that I had not anticipated early in my career: to bring science to the largest number of people possible.

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The Two-Way
11:36 am
Wed November 13, 2013

'Got You, You Rat,' Woman Tells 'Whitey' Bulger At Sentencing

James "Whitey" Bulger was captured in June 2011 in Santa Monica, Calif., with his longtime girlfriend, Catherine Greig.

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 12:55 pm

(With the day's court action over, we updated this post at noon ET.)

Confronting James "Whitey" Bulger, who she believes killed her father in addition to the 11 people he's been convicting of murdering, a woman told the mob boss Wednesday morning that "we got you, you rat."

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Monkey See
11:14 am
Wed November 13, 2013

'The Real World' Trades The Final Eight Percent Of Its Soul For Magic Beans

The cast of The Real World: Portland.
MTV

It's hard to remember when you look at the last umpteen seasons of MTV's The Real World, but back at the beginning, it was a pretty fascinating show. It once involved people who had actual plans to be musicians or artists or activists, and although there was always conflict, the days before everyone knew the rhythms of Real World editing — which became the rhythms of reality editing in general — it was, I repeat, a pretty fascinating show.

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The Two-Way
9:54 am
Wed November 13, 2013

HealthCare.gov's Mystery Lady Says She's Been Cyberbullied

HealthCare.gov

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 1:21 pm

The woman whose smiling face adorned the HealthCare.gov website in the first days after its launch has stepped forward to tearfully address those who she says cyberbullied her as they took potshots at the Obama administration's troubled online health exchange.

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The Two-Way
8:51 am
Wed November 13, 2013

Record $142.4M For Francis Bacon Art; Warhol Fetches $57.3M

Francis Bacon's 1969 triptych Three Studies of Lucian Freud.
Christie's Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 1:45 pm

Three Studies of Lucian Freud, a 1969 triptych painting by artist Francis Bacon, was sold for a record $142.4 million Tuesday night at Christie's in Manhattan.

It's now "the most expensive artwork ever sold at auction," The Associated Press reports. The previous record: "the nearly $120 million paid for Edvard Munch's The Scream, which set a world record when it was sold at Sotheby's in a 2012 sale."

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Shots - Health News
7:58 am
Wed November 13, 2013

Why American Medical Care Could Soon Be Like Air Travel

Wilfred Mobley pushes through the emergency room patient at the University of Miami Hospital in 2012.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Health care isn't getting more expensive because of all those aging boomers, or because doctors are ordering too many tests.

The bigger problem these days is how much we're being charged for drugs, hospital stays, doctors and bureaucracy, according to an analysis in JAMA, the American Medical Association's journal.

Those items have accounted for almost 91 percent the increase in health care spending since 2000, the researchers say.

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The Two-Way
7:40 am
Wed November 13, 2013

In Shattered Philippine City, A Fight For 'Sheer Survival'

In anguish: Tears ran down the cheeks of a man as he waited with other survivors Tuesday for a flight out of Tacloban in the Philippines, which was devastated by Typhoon Haiyan.
Paula Bronstein Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 8:44 pm

  • Marine Brig. Gen. Paul Kennedy
  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports from Tacloban, the Philippines
  • From the NPR Newscast: Anthony Kuhn on the scene in Tacloban

(We updated this post at 10:40 a.m. ET to include the latest official death toll of more than 2,300.)

As some trucks loaded with food and other aid arrive in the Philippine city of Tacloban, they're being looted by residents struggling to survive in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan, NPR's Anthony Kuhn said Wednesday on Morning Edition.

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The Two-Way
7:16 am
Wed November 13, 2013

Book News: TV Pitchman Kevin Trudeau Jailed For Diet-Book Lies

Author and infomercial pitchman Kevin Trudeau.
AP

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 8:41 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Health Care
5:11 am
Wed November 13, 2013

Democrats Join Calls To Rectify Canceled Health Insurance

People protest President Obama's "If you like your insurance you can keep it" comment during a presidential visit to Dallas last week.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 2:57 pm

In Washington this week, calls to fix the problem of people getting insurance cancellation notices are getting louder and coming from all sides. But turning back the clock on health insurance cancellations turns out to be a lot harder than it sounds.

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The Two-Way
6:49 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Hawaii's Senate Gives Final Approval To Same-Sex Marriage

Hawaii state Sen. Clayton Hee playfully gives Gov. Neil Abercrombie a kiss on the head before he signs the Hawaii Civil Unions bill into law at a ceremony in February 2011 in Honolulu.
Eugene Tanner AP

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 7:10 pm

Hawaii's Senate has given the OK to a bill allowing same-sex marriage, which now goes to the governor, who is expected to sign.

Gay marriage is legal in 14 states and the District of Columbia. Illinois passed a similar law last week, which is awaiting the governor's signature.

Reuters says the measure in Hawaii cleared the state Senate on a 19-4 vote, with the chamber's lone Republican joining three Democrats to oppose the bill.

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Shots - Health News
5:56 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

So, You Have Gonorrhea. Who Tells Your Ex?

Illustration by Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 10:48 pm

In an effort to stop a spate of gonorrhea outbreaks, at least one public health department in the Pacific Northwest is offering a helpful service to infected patients: anonymous notification of former sexual partners.

That's right. A government worker will track down and contact each ex for you. Awkward for all concerned? Yes. But at a time when gonorrhea is becoming stubbornly drug-resistant, health officials see it as time — and embarrassment — well spent.

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The Two-Way
5:47 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Chicago's Legendary Billy Goat Tavern May Be Displaced

Billy Goat wanders around the Billy Goat Tavern in Chicago in 2003, when the Cubs lost the seven-game National League Championship Series.
Steve Matteo AP

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 8:58 pm

A huge, expensive new building planned for construction in Chicago may temporarily displace the legendary Billy Goat Tavern.

The subterranean tavern has remained the same since it moved to that location in 1964.

The Chicago Tribune spoke to owner Sam Sianis:

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Shots - Health News
5:43 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Shift In Cholesterol Advice Could Double Statin Use

Statin drugs to lower cholesterol have become among the most widely prescribed prescription medications in the United States.
Bill Gallery ASSOCIATED PRESS

Originally published on Thu November 14, 2013 2:57 pm

After decades of cajoling Americans to know their cholesterol level and get it down as low as possible, the nation's leading heart specialists are changing course.

Cholesterol is still important. But new guidelines published Tuesday afternoon throw out the notion that a specific blood cholesterol level should automatically trigger treatment with cholesterol-lowering drugs.

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