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The Two-Way
7:32 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Book News: Lance Armstrong's Lies Are Protected, Judge Says

Lance Armstrong talks to the media after the 2011 Xterra Nationals triathlon in Utah.
Jim Urquhart AP

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
7:00 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Russian Plan 'Is Just A Lie,' Syrian Rebel General Says

A Free Syrian Army fighter in eastern Syria on Wednesday.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 10:13 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': Free Syrian Army Gen. Salim Idris

As Secretary of State John Kerry was preparing to sit down with his Russian counterpart Thursday to discuss whether the Assad regime's chemical weapons can be handed over to international monitors, the commander of the rebel Free Syrian Army was telling NPR that "the Russian initiative is just a lie."

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Shots - Health News
3:45 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Why Painting Tumors Could Make Brain Surgeons Better

Physician Jim Olson cares for children with brain cancer in Seattle. His laboratory studies the gene expression programs controlling neural differentiation, brain tumor genesis and neurodegenerative diseases.
Courtesy of Susie Fitzhugh/Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 6:58 am

Perhaps one of the most uncomfortable things a doctor has to tell patients is that their medical problems are iatrogenic. What that means is they were caused by a doctor in the course of the treatment.

Sometime these iatrogenic injuries are accidental. But sometimes, because of the limits of medical technology, they can be inevitable. Now, a medical researcher in Seattle thinks he has a way to eliminate some of the inevitable ones.

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The Two-Way
6:13 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

Satellite Image Suggests North Korea Is Restarting Reactor

This is a DigitalGlobe image of the 5-megawatt (electric) reactor at North Korea's Yongbyon facility, Aug. 31, with steam seen coming from the electrical power generation building.
DigitalGlobe/ScapeWare3d via Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 6:46 pm

North Korea appears to be in the process of restarting a nuclear reactor used to produce weapons-grade plutonium, five years after shutting the facility down as part of international disarmament efforts.

New satellite imagery appears to reveal that the 5-megawatt reactor at Yongbyon, which experts believe can produce enough plutonium for one to two bombs a year, shows signs of being operational.

Analysts Nick Hansen and Jeffrey Lewis, writing for the website 38 North, say the satellites show:

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The Two-Way
6:09 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

Protesters Hound David Petraeus Before Lecture At CUNY

David Petraeus resigned as head of the CIA in November, citing an extramarital affair.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 11:10 pm

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The Salt
5:50 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

Earl Of Sandwich Blended Frappes Long Before Starbucks

Would he have won a James Beard? The First Earl of Sandwich probably brought the iced chocolate drink to England from Spain, decades before the recipe appeared in cookbooks.
Jan Arkesteijn Wikimedia.org

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 2:19 pm

In the ranks of English nobility, the Montague family may have just been earls. But in the kitchen, they were kings.

A historian has stumbled upon the first English recipe for a frozen chocolate dessert — think chocolate sorbet crossed with a Slurpee. Even in 17th century speak, it sounds simple:

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The Salt
5:25 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

Pets Or Livestock? A Moral Divide Over Horse Slaughter

Jamesport has the largest Amish community in Missouri, and horse-pulled buggies are often parked alongside cars. Horse owners in the state are divided over whether to allow horses to be killed for meat in the U.S.
Frank Morris for NPR

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 7:30 pm

Few Americans eat horse meat, and many don't like the idea of slaughtering horses. But a handful of investors are struggling to restart the horse-slaughter industry in the U.S.

Thousands of American horses are already slaughtered in Mexico and Canada each year for their meat, which gets shipped to European and Asian markets.

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Shots - Health News
5:13 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

Proposed Alaska Road Pits Villagers Against Environmentalists

Interior Secretary Sally Jewell (center) gets a tour of King Cove, Alaska.
Annie Feidt Alaska Public Radio Network

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 6:29 pm

The town of King Cove, Alaska, is crowded onto a narrow spit, surrounded by ocean and isolated by rows of volcanic mountains.

It's an Aleut Native community of about a thousand people, and for roughly a third of the year, treacherous winds close its airstrip. There's no road between King Cove and Cold Bay, the nearest town with year-round air facilities. When the weather turns bad, the only way out of King Cove is a two-hour boat trip through choppy seas.

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The Two-Way
4:14 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

On Sept. 11, Logan Airport Holds Fire Drill, With Smoke, Flames

The fire and smoke used for a drill at Logan Airport on Wednesday.
WBZ-TV via Twitter

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 6:40 pm

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick said what happened at Logan Airport today was "just dumb."

On the 12th anniversary of Sept. 11, Logan officials OK'd a fire drill that included flames and thick black smoke. Remember, two of the planes used in the terrorist attacks took off from Logan. Peter Wilson of WBZ-TV tweeted this picture of drill:

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The Two-Way
3:51 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

From Anonymous To Media Star To Unemployed In A Week

A screen grab of Elizabeth O'Bagy's appearance on Fox News on Sept. 5. She has been on many news programs in recent days commenting on the Syrian war. She was fired on Wednesday for falsely claiming to have a Ph.D., according to her employer, the Institute for the Study of War.
Fox News

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 4:06 pm

If you're following the Syrian debate, there's a good chance you've come across Elizabeth O'Bagy, an analyst on the Syrian war, who went from obscure think tank analyst to media darling to unemployed in roughly a week.

Here's how she did it.

O'Bagy, 26, was a senior analyst at the Institute for the Study of War in Washington. Her specialty, the Syrian rebels, received only periodic flickers of attention.

Then came the Aug. 21 chemical weapons attack in Syria, followed by President Obama's declared intent to carry out a military strike in Syria.

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The Two-Way
3:39 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

What's In A Name? Potentially, Major Controversy

The western span of the San Francisco Bay Bridge in a photo taken earlier this week.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

The new eastern span of the Bay Bridge, connecting Oakland and San Francisco, opened earlier this month. But it's the western span that's now causing controversy.

The California Senate is expected to vote this week to approve a resolution naming the span after Willie Brown, a former San Francisco mayor and state Assembly speaker. The idea sailed through the state Legislature last month, winning approval on a 68-0 vote.

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The Two-Way
3:05 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

Vatican's Secretary Of State Says Celibacy Is An Open Question

Pietro Parolin in 2009.
Hoang Dinh Nam AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 4:33 pm

The Vatican's new secretary of state made some comments in an interview with a Venezuelan newspaper earlier this week that have surprised many.

Archbishop Pietro Parolin, whom Pope Francis appointed on Aug. 31, said the issue of priest celibacy is open to discussion.

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The Two-Way
2:55 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

Discovery Of Massive Aquifers Could Be Game Changer For Kenya

Members of the El Molo tribe are pictured in the village of Komote, on the shores of Lake Turkana, northern Kenya, last year.
Carl De Souza AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 4:07 pm

Satellite imagery and seismic data have identified two huge underground aquifers in Kenya's drought-prone north, a discovery that could be "a game changer" for the country, NPR's Gregory Warner reports.

The aquifers, located hundreds of feet underground in the Turkana region that borders Ethiopia and South Sudan, contain billions of gallons of water, according to UNESCO, which confirmed the existence of the subterranean lakes discovered with the help of a French company using technology originally designed to reveal oil deposits.

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The Two-Way
2:05 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

U.S. Troops Oppose Striking Syria, Online Survey Suggests

Members of the U.S. Marine Corps listen to President Obama during his visit to Camp Pendleton, Calif., in August.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

An online survey of 750 active-duty U.S. troops suggests that opposition to striking Syria is "more intense" among military personnel than among the American public.

Military Times, a publication and newssite owned by Gannett Co. (not the federal government) reports that:

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
1:54 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

The 10 Most Important Questions In Science*

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 4:52 pm

I noticed in The Guardian that there's a book coming out this week listing the 20 biggest challenges for modern science. I'd like to go over 10 of them today, perhaps coming back to the other 10 next week.

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