NPR Blogs

Shots - Health News
12:15 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

In Rural Uganda, Homemade Bikes Make The Best Ambulances

Bike ambulance driver Grace Kakyo transports a patient in northern Uganda.
Photo courtesy CA Bikes

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 7:56 am

When Chris Ategeka was 9, his younger brother died while Ategeka was helping to carry him to the nearest hospital — 10 miles from their village in Fort Portal, Uganda.

There was no quicker way to get his sick brother, who was coughing and had a bloody stool, to medical care. "I did not understand the concept of lack of mobility being the biggest factor until it got later in life. I realized how that could have helped so much," he tells Shots.

Read more
Krulwich Wonders...
12:00 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

This Pulsing Earth

John Nelson IDV Solutions

It's breathing, he thought. "All of a sudden I see a thing with a heartbeat."

John Nelson is a designer, well known for tracing complex weather patterns or cultural information on maps, so considering what he usually does, this was easy. NASA's Visible Earth team publishes pictures of our planet every month of the year, so John thought, why not stitch them together, and see what the seasons look like from outer space?

So he stitched, and then looked.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:32 am
Mon August 12, 2013

After Much Hype, Elon Musk Unveils His High-Speed 'Hyperloop'

Elon Musk's "Hyperloop" vehicle.
Elon Musk

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 6:03 pm

Update at 4:45 p.m. ET. Introducing Hyperloop:

Bloomberg scored the big scoop and got Elon Musk — the founder of Tesla, SpaceX and Paypal — to explain his vision for a high-speed mass transit vehicle that could deliver you from Los Angeles to San Francisco in an astonishing 30 minutes. Musk explained that the Hyperloop pods would leave every 30 seconds and would run inside "low pressure" tubes. Bloomberg continues:

Read more
The Two-Way
10:58 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Judge Orders Baby's Name Changed From 'Messiah'

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 11:47 am

A Tennessee judge ordered a baby's name changed from Messiah to Martin last week, after the boy's parents went to court to fight over their son's last name. The boy's mother, Jaleesa Martin, says she was shocked by the decision and that she'll appeal the judge's order to rename her baby Martin DeShawn McCullough.

Read more
13.7: Cosmos And Culture
10:35 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Is There Existential Meaning Beyond Religion?

A man reaches for a wooden cross in the sea during an Epiphany ceremony in the Greek port of Thessaloniki on January 6, 2011.
Sakis Mitrolidis AFP/Getty Images

Religious beliefs are often (though not always) comforting. The idea of an afterlife can be attractive. Ideas like fate and destiny — or simply things happen for a reason — can make it easier to cope with difficult situations. It's nice to think that humans have a purpose, that we were put here for some reason, that the natural world is meaningful.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:23 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Rodeo Clown In Obama Mask Sparks Outrage, Apologies

A photo taken of the clown who wore a mask resembling President Obama during a rodeo at the Missouri State Fair on Saturday.
Jameson Hsieh AP

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 11:42 am

"It was feeling like some kind of Klan rally."

That's the reaction of spectator Perry Beam to Saturday's appearance at the Missouri State Fair in Sedalia, Mo., of a rodeo clown wearing a mask meant to look like President Obama and what happened during his performance.

Videos that Beam took show some of the scene and capture some of what the rodeo announcer and another clown were saying. The Kansas City Star has posted two of the clips on its YouTube channel.

Read more
Monkey See
8:31 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Can You Really Dissolve A Guy In A Bathtub? 'Mythbusters' Tackles 'Breaking Bad'

Adam Savage and Aaron Paul trade some information on Monday night's Mythbusters.
Don Feria Discovery

Perhaps you heard that last night, a plucky little drug dealer named Walter White returned to television for his last eight episodes of the award-hoarding Breaking Bad.

But before he began his life of crime, Walter White was a chemistry teacher, and chemistry is what originally made him such a great meth cook. Breaking Bad has always included a lot of science talk, especially in the early days, and the time has come for someone to see whether it holds up.

And by "someone," I mean "Mythbusters."

Read more
The Two-Way
8:29 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Top Stories: Drug Law Changes; Egypt's Warning To Protesters

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 10:43 am

Read more
The Two-Way
7:09 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Book News: Does Lance Armstrong Have The Right To Lie In His Memoirs?

Lance Armstrong is being sued for false claims in his books, which were marketed as nonfiction.
Nathalie Magniez Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 9:47 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Read more
The Salt
3:09 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Food Delivery Hits The Web, But Restaurants Pay The Price

A Seamless sticker is displayed next to the menu in the window of a restaurant in New York's Times Square on Saturday. Rivals Seamless and GrubHub said Friday that they have completed their combination, creating an online takeout company covering about 25,000 restaurants in 500 cities.
Mary Altaffer AP

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 8:56 am

Two big restaurant delivery websites — Grubhub and Seamless — have announced a merger. Together, they'll allow diners in 500 cities the convenience of ordering from thousands of restaurants with just a few clicks on their computer. For restaurants, the costs of being on these websites can be hard to swallow.

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:07 am
Mon August 12, 2013

New Muscle Drugs Could Be The Next Big Thing In Sports Doping

Belgian Blue bulls look like they are made of muscle because they have a mutation in the gene that codes for the protein myostatin. In humans, as in other types of cattle, myostatin normally limits the number of muscle fibers that form before birth and then limits the growth of those fibers later on.
Courtesy of Se-Jin Lee and Alexandra McPherron PNAS

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 11:03 am

Research intended to help people with muscle-wasting diseases could be about to launch a new era in performance-enhancing drugs.

The research has produced several muscle-building drugs now being tested in people with medical problems, including muscular dystrophy, cancer and kidney disease. The drugs all work by blocking a substance called myostatin that the body normally produces to keep muscles from getting too big.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:31 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

Reactor Powered Up On First 'Made in India' Nuclear Sub

A Russian Akula-class sub in Brest harbor, western France, in 2004. The INS Arihant is said to be based on this Cold War design.
Fred Tanneau AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 12:44 pm

India has activated the reactor aboard the INS Arihant, believed to be the first nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarine designed and built outside the Cold War "nuclear club."

Prime Minister Manmohan Singh called the event a "giant stride in ... our indigenous technological capabilities."

It's the first nuclear-powered submarine built in India and the first such vessel constructed by a country other than the United States, U.K., France, Russia or China.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:25 am
Sun August 11, 2013

Family Rescued In Pacific After Sailing 'Where God Led Us'

The Gastonguays hoped to reach the vast archipelago nation of Kiribati, part of which is shown in this 2001 photo.
Torsten Blackwood AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 2:59 pm

A leap of faith that sent an Arizona family bound for the South Pacific in a sailboat has returned them in an airplane after a harrowing ordeal at sea that saw them adrift and nearly out of food in one of the remotest stretches of ocean on the planet.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:28 am
Sun August 11, 2013

Israel OKs New Settlement Construction In West Bank

Chief Palestinian negotiator Saeb Erakat speaks to the media with Israel's chief negotiator and Justice Minister Tzipi Livni (left) and Secretary of State John Kerry in Washington on July 30.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 8:20 am

Israel's housing minister has given the green light to build 1,200 apartments in Jewish settlements in the West Bank, complicating newly revived peace talks with the Palestinians.

The decision comes as the two sides prepare for a second round of talks in Jerusalem after a high-level meeting in Washington, D.C., on July 31 — the first in five years.

The Associated Press writes:

Read more

Pages