NPR Blogs

The Two-Way
4:16 pm
Sun November 17, 2013

Pakistan Plans To Try Ex-President Musharraf For Treason

Former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf at an anti-terrorism court in Islamabad on April 20.
Aamir Qureshi AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 10:01 am

Pakistan's interior minister said that the country plans to try its former military ruler Pervez Musharraf for treason. During his rule, Musharraf declared a state of emergency and suspended the constitution.

The AP reports the charges could mean the death penalty or life in prison if convicted. The wire service adds:

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:29 pm
Sun November 17, 2013

Why A Patient's Story Matters More Than A Computer Checklist

Illustration by Daniel Horowitz for NPR

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 9:22 am

As I walk to the door of my patient's house on a dirt road outside Tuscaloosa, Ala., I step gingerly. Mrs. Edgars says that she killed a rattlesnake in her flower bed last year.

She is at the door, expecting my visit. Mr. Edgars sits on the couch, unable to recall that I am his doctor, or even that I am a doctor. But he is happy to see me nonetheless.

We chat a moment, then we move on to Mr. Edgars' arthritis. Early on in his dementia he wandered the woods. His wife was afraid he would get lost and die, although the family agreed that this was how he would want it.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:08 pm
Sun November 17, 2013

Tornadoes In Illinois Cause 'Severe Damage'

A satellite image showing severe weather as it moves through the midwest area of the United States on Sunday.
NOAA Getty Images

Originally published on Sun November 17, 2013 10:49 pm

(This post was last updated at 5:16 p.m. ET.)

A line of storms moving through the country's midsection has already produced a few damaging tornadoes and the National Weather Service predicts that major severe weather could break out as the system moves east.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:48 pm
Sun November 17, 2013

Passenger Plane Crash In Russia Leaves 50 Dead

A commercial aircraft crashed during a landing in the central Russian city of Kazan, state media is reporting.

According to RIA Novosti and Russia Today, the Emergencies Ministry says they fear at least 50 people are dead. RT reports:

Read more
The Salt
11:29 am
Sun November 17, 2013

See How Food Stamp Cuts Are Hitting Across The U.S.

Screen grab of a map that shows hard numbers about who's getting hit by food stamp cuts.
Stateline

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 4:20 pm

When you think of Oregon and food, you probably think organic chicken, kale chips and other signs of a strong local food movement. What probably doesn't come to mind? Food stamps.

And yet, 21 percent of Oregon's population – that's one out of every five residents – relies on food stamps to get by. And like many people across the country, these Oregon families who have come to rely on federal food assistance program for meals are learning to make do with less as of this month.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:08 am
Sun November 17, 2013

Doris Lessing, Nobel Prize-Winning Author, Dies

British author Doris Lessing (L) shows her prize insignia of the 2007 Nobel Prize in Literature at the Wallace Collection in London in 2008.
Shaun Curry AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 10:43 am

Doris Lessing, the Nobel Prize-winning author, died Sunday morning according her publisher, Harper Collins.

Lessing, who produced 55 works, including poetry, operas and short stories, was 94 years old.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:52 am
Sun November 17, 2013

Boeing Announces Huge $95 Billion Haul At Dubai Airshow

A model of the Boeing 777-9X is displayed during the Dubai Airshow on Sunday, in the United Arab Emirates' capital Dubai.
Marwan Naamani AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 8:55 am

The Chicago-based Boeing Co. announced a stunning haul at the Dubai Airshow on Sunday: Emirates, Qatar Airways, Eithad Airways, Lufthansa and Qatar bought 259 of its new 777 aircraft.

Based on list prices, the agreements are worth more than $95 billion.

Reuters reports:

Read more
The Two-Way
8:59 am
Sun November 17, 2013

In The Philippines, Signs Of Hope As Relief Efforts Pick Up

A girl crosses between collapsed roof tops in the damaged downtown area in Tacloban, Philippines, on Sunday.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Sun November 17, 2013 2:12 pm

A little over a week after a major typhoon devastated parts of the Philippines, there is some reason for hope today.

NPR's Russell Lewis, who has been trying to get to Tacloban all week, points us to the front page of today's The Philippine Star: "Aid Delivery To Leyte, Samar Speeding Up" the main headline reads.

Read more
The Salt
6:35 am
Sun November 17, 2013

MSG, Seasoned For A Comeback

According to legend, Japanese chemist Kikunae Ikeda discovered the food additive monosodium glutamate in 1908 after contemplating the meaty flavor of seaweed soup.
Jung K Oh iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 4:20 pm

Umami, that savory fifth taste — in addition to bitter, sour, sweet and salty — has become a sought-after flavor in the culinary scene.

Not quite so beloved is the umami additive monosodium glutamate — MSG, as it's more popularly known. For decades it's been vilified, maligned and, some say, misunderstood.

Read more
The Salt
6:35 am
Sun November 17, 2013

'Anything That Moves' Explores America's Extreme Food Culture

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun November 17, 2013 4:20 pm

Author Dana Goodyear has spent a lot of time dining with foodies who champion bugs as a meal. And horses. And brains. Whales. Leaves. Weeds. Ash. Hay. Even plain dirt.

Goodyear, a staff writer for The New Yorker, set out to document the outer bounds of the extreme food culture that has taken hold among American foodies. Their quest for ever more exotic, challenging ingredients, she says, is raising fundamental questions about the nature of food itself and the assumptions that underlie what we view as acceptable to eat.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:25 pm
Sat November 16, 2013

That Clam In Your Chowder Might Be Hundreds Of Years Old

Mike Cardew MCT/Landov

First we heard on Morning Edition that a clam scientists had opened up turned out to have been 507 years old.

That led us to stories with headlines like this: "Scientists accidentally kill world's oldest animal at age 507."

Read more
The Two-Way
3:50 pm
Sat November 16, 2013

Holy Heartwarmer! No One Can Seem To Get Enough Of Batkid

The little cape crusader's fans were out on Friday in San Francisco.
Jeff Chiu AP

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 4:44 pm

One day after San Francisco was turned into Gotham City so that a little boy who battled leukemia could fight off some archcriminals, fans still can't seem to get enough of Miles Scott, a.k.a. Batkid.

Just explore #batkid on Twitter and you'll see what we mean.

The news networks also can't leave the story alone.

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:25 pm
Sat November 16, 2013

New Medical Device Treats Epilepsy With A Well-Timed Zap

The device sits under a patient's skull and tracks brain activity.
Courtesy of NeuroPace

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 9:35 am

Imagine a tiny computer embedded under your scalp that's constantly tracking your brain activity and zapping you when it senses something awry.

That might sound like science fiction, but a medical device that does that was just approved by the Food and Drug Administration as an option for people with epilepsy that's resistant to treatment with drugs.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:35 pm
Sat November 16, 2013

Body Of Florida Man Who Fell From Plane May Have Been Found

The sky above the Atlantic Ocean near Miami. What happened up there?
Arthur Mitchell Landov

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 4:30 pm

One important clue to solving the mystery of what happened this week over the Atlantic Ocean near Miami may have been discovered:

Read more
The Two-Way
1:47 pm
Sat November 16, 2013

U.S. Soldier Accused Of Murder In Deaths Of Deaf Iraqi Boys

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 4:13 pm

A U.S. Army sergeant who in 2007 allegedly shot and killed two unarmed deaf Iraqi boys who had no known ties to the insurgents then battling American forces, has now been charged with two counts of premeditated murder.

The story of what Sgt. 1st Class Michael Barbera allegedly did was spelled out in detail last December by the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. An online version of the newspaper's 8-page report is posted here. It began its package of stories this way:

Read more

Pages