NPR Blogs

The Two-Way
9:37 am
Wed May 1, 2013

So, A Tiger Walks Into A Zoo ...

Stephen Jaffe AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 10:03 am

This is no joke:

A wild male tiger, which seems to be in search of some female companionship, has been lured into eastern India's Nandankanan Zoological Park after several frightening nights for those in nearby villages.

According to the Deccan Herald:

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The Two-Way
8:59 am
Wed May 1, 2013

Slow Growth In April: Survey Shows 119,000 Jobs Added

In Denver last month, a recruiter (right) talked with a job seeker at a health care career fair. There was job growth in April, according to a new survey, but the pace was modest.
Rick Wilking Reuters /Landov

A relatively weak 119,000 jobs were added to private employers' payrolls last month as federal spending cuts and tax increases began to bite, according to the latest ADP National Employment Report.

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The Two-Way
8:51 am
Wed May 1, 2013

Boston Bombing: No Death Penalty If Suspect Cooperates?

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, in an undated photo released by the FBI.
FBI.gov

Following up on word there have been discussions between lawyers for Boston Marathon bombings suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev and federal investigators about sparing him from the possibility of the death penalty if he provides valuable information about the attacks, NPR counterterrorism correspondent

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
8:38 am
Wed May 1, 2013

Who's Afraid Of The Quantum Ghost?

iStockphoto.com

When Isaac Newton published his theory of universal gravitation in 1686, he knew he'd have to confront a few critics. Like a ghost stretching its arms across empty space, Newton's theory described the gravitational attraction between two masses, say, the Sun and the Earth, as a mysterious force that acted instantaneously between them.

How could the Sun influence the Earth, and the Earth the Sun, without direct contact?

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The Two-Way
6:57 am
Wed May 1, 2013

Book News: Andrew Cuomo Signs Book Deal With HarperCollins

Andrew Cuomo leaves a news conference in February 2010 in New York City.
Chris Hondros Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
6:52 am
Wed May 1, 2013

U.S. Said To Be Leaning Toward Arming Syrian Rebels

Opposition fighters from the Free Syrian Army last month in Aleppo, Syria.
Maysun EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 8:46 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Kelly McEvers on the U.S. options regarding Syria

As the U.S. considers a "spectrum of military options" it could take to assist the groups battling against the regime of Syrian President Bashar Assad, the Obama administration is leaning toward giving lethal arms to some of those rebels, a senior administration official has told NPR's Kelly McEvers.

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The Salt
3:19 am
Wed May 1, 2013

Antibiotic-Resistant Bugs Turn Up Again In Turkey Meat

A truckload of live turkeys arrives at a Cargill plant in Springdale, Ark., in 2011. Most turkeys in the U.S. are regularly given low doses of antibiotics.
Danny Johnston AP

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 5:29 pm

Consumer groups are stepping up pressure on animal producers and their practice of giving antibiotics to healthy animals to prevent disease. In two new reports, the groups say they're worried that the preventive use of antibiotics is contributing to the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, which get harder to treat in humans and animals over time.

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Shots - Health News
3:17 am
Wed May 1, 2013

Mother And Daughter Injured In Boston Bombing Face New Future

Celeste Corcoran and her daughter, Sydney, were injured in the Boston Marathon bombings.
Ellen Webber for NPR

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 11:59 am

Forty-seven-year-old Celeste Corcoran is propped up in her hospital bed. In a nearby window is a forest of blooming white orchids from well-wishers. On the opposite wall, a big banner proclaims "Corcoran Strong."

She's recalling how thrilled she was to be near the finish line of the Boston Marathon, waiting for her sister Carmen Accabo to run by. "I just remember standing there, wanting to be as close as I could to catch her," Corcoran says. "I really just needed to see her face."

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The Two-Way
6:15 pm
Tue April 30, 2013

Video May Show 747 Jet's Last Seconds Before Bagram Crash

A dashcam video purports to show the crash of a civilian cargo 747 in Afghanistan Monday.
LiveLeak

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 1:06 pm

Update at 1 p.m. ET, May 1: Victims Identified:

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The Two-Way
6:07 pm
Tue April 30, 2013

Mask Recovered From Suspect's Trash Tests Positive For Ricin

Federal authorities wearing hazmat suits walk to the home of J. Everett Dutschke on April 23, 2013 in Tupelo, Miss.
Rogelio V. Solis AP

FBI agents witnessed J. Everett Dutschke trying to get rid of items authorities say would implicate him with the mailing of ricin-laced letters to President Obama and other officials.

As we've reported, the FBI originally arrested Paul Kevin Curtis in the case, but Curtis told them he was being set up by Dutschke, his rival.

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Shots - Health News
4:43 pm
Tue April 30, 2013

How Doctors Would Know If Syrians Were Hit With Nerve Gas

Doctors at a hospital in Aleppo, Syria, treat a boy injured in what the government said was a chemical weapons attack on March 19. Syria's government and rebels accused each other of firing a rocket loaded with chemical agents outside of Aleppo.
George Ourfalian Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed May 1, 2013 12:02 pm

President Obama affirmed Tuesday that there's evidence Syrians have been attacked with chemical weapons — in particular, nerve gas.

But that's not the same as proof positive.

"We don't know how they were used, when they were used, who used them," Obama said. "We don't have a chain of custody that establishes what exactly happened."

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The Salt
3:59 pm
Tue April 30, 2013

Why An Immigration Deal Won't Solve The Farmworker Shortage

American farms like this iceberg lettuce field owned by Duda Farm Fresh Foods outside Salinas, Calif., are facing a dwindling supply of farmworkers from rural Mexico.
Kirk Siegler

Originally published on Tue April 30, 2013 8:01 pm

The Salinas Valley in Northern California grows about 80 percent of the country's lettuce, and it takes a lot of people to pick and pack it. In a field owned by Duda Farm Fresh Foods, a dozen lechugueros, or lettuce pickers, are bent at the waist, cutting heads of iceberg lettuce. They work frantically to stay in front of a line of 12 more packers, who seal them with tape and toss them onto a conveyor belt.

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The Two-Way
3:53 pm
Tue April 30, 2013

Spanish Judge Orders Bags Of Blood Destroyed In Doping Case

Doctor Eufemiano Fuentes, left, arrives at a court house in Madrid on January 28, 2013.
Dani Pozo AFP/Getty Images

By all accounts, it was a less-than-spectacular end to one of Spain's biggest doping cases. El País, the country's biggest newspaper, summed up the trial of Dr. Eufemiano Fuentes saying it ended without blood and without a sentence.

Fuentes was convicted of endangering public health and was given a one-year suspended sentence, a $6,000 fine and a four-year ban from practicing medicine. Most people sentenced under two years in Spain skip prison.

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The Salt
3:52 pm
Tue April 30, 2013

Caffeine-Laced Gum Has Energized The FDA

Wrigley says its new Alert Energy Caffeine Gum gives consumers the power to control how much caffeine they get.
Wrigley Incorporated

The caffeinated chewing gum has pushed the FDA over the edge.

The federal agency held its tongue when caffeinated potato chips, jelly beans, chocolate, sunflower seeds and energy bars hit the market.

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