NPR Blogs

Shots - Health News
10:13 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Catholics Split Again On Coverage For Birth Control

Baltimore Archbishop William Lori gave voice to a letter Catholic groups sent to the administration and Congress to protest insurance rules for contraceptives.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 2:42 pm

  • As Heard On Morning Edition

Two prominent Catholic groups are finding themselves, once again, on opposite sides of a key issue regarding the Affordable Care Act.

Three years ago, the Catholic Health Association, whose members run hospitals and nursing homes across the country, backed passage of the health law. The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, which represents the hierarchy of the church, opposed it.

Now the groups are divided over the law's requirement for most employer-based health insurance plans to provide women with birth control.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:54 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Foul Play, Negligence Not Ruled Out In Quebec Train Disaster

Do not cross: Crime scene tape blocks access to part of Lac-M├ęgantic, Quebec, where a train derailed and exploded on Saturday.
Stephen Morrison EPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 6:19 am

Quebec police are looking into whether Saturday's train derailment and the massive explosions that followed in the small town of Lac-Megantic were caused by "foul play or criminal negligence," CBC News reported Wednesday morning.

Read more
Shots - Health News
9:11 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Tax Break Can Help With Health Coverage, But There's A Catch

Tax credits may help make health insurance more affordable, but can bite back if your income goes up more than expected.
iStockphoto.com

There are two kinds of financial help for people planning to enroll in the online health insurance marketplaces that will open this fall. One could put people at risk of having to pay some of the money back, while the other won't.

That's one big difference between tax credits and subsidies, both of which are intended to help people with lower incomes pay for health insurance through the new health care law.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:03 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Royals In Nappies: A Family Album

Little Princess Elizabeth takes a ride on the grounds of Windsor Castle in 1927 with her cousin, Gerald Lascelles.
AP

The photographers are already setting up ahead of the expected birth this month of the little prince or princess who will be Britain's third in line to the throne.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:53 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Reports: Egypt Orders Arrest Of Muslim Brotherhood Leader

Muslim Brotherhood leader Mohammed Badie in Cairo last December.
EPA/Landov

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 8:57 am

Prosecutors in Egypt have ordered that Muslim Brotherhood leader Mohammed Badie be arrested, according to Egyptian state television and other news outlets.

NPR's Leila Fadel adds from Cairo that she's been told about the order by an Egyptian security official with knowledge of what's happening.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:47 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Book News: 'Ender's Game' Author Responds To Boycott Threats

Orson Scott Card poses at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, in 2008.
Wikimedia Commons/ Nihonjoe

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 7:08 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:45 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Investors Brace For News Out Of Fed Minutes

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke during a news conference in June. Financial markets reacted to comments he made then by selling off bonds and stocks.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 9:13 am

After the Federal Open Market Committee meeting last month, the financial markets "freaked out," according to David Wessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal.

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke's remarks at the time sent a shockwave through the markets when he suggested the Fed's stimulus could end.

Read more
Shots - Health News
4:32 am
Wed July 10, 2013

How Oregon Is Getting 'Frequent Fliers' Out Of The ER

Jeremie Seals used to go to the hospital emergency room to avoid sleeping in his car.
Kristian Foden-Vencil OPB

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 8:03 am

Forty-year-old Jeremie Seals has had a tough life.

He left home at 14, and his health isn't good. He had a heart attack when he was 35. He has congestive heart failure, and nerve pain in his legs that he says is "real bad."

"Long story short, I'm terminal," he says, matter-of-factly.

Seals is unwilling to divulge too much about his past. But over the years, he says his health has deteriorated to such a degree that he can no longer hold a job.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:10 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Asiana Crash Trip Was Pilot's First As Instructor, NTSB Says

The pilot who attempted to land Asiana Airlines Flight 214 in San Francisco , says the National Transportation Safety Board. Here, a member of the team investigating the crash-landing takes a photo of the plane's landing gear.
NTSB Flickr

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 8:49 pm

Three pilots, all of them with extensive flying experience, were in the cockpit of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 when it crash-landed at San Francisco International Airport Saturday, says National Transportation Safety Board Chair Deborah Hersman.

Read more
Shots - Health News
5:07 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Harmful Parasites In Cat Poop Are Widespread

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 8:34 am

That cat poop can pose a health risk to humans no longer surprises us.

Some cats carry a parasite called Toxoplasma gondii. Infected cats shed embryonic T. gondii, called oocysts, in their feces.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:01 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Members Of Elite Firefighting Unit Memorialized In Arizona

Former Granite Mountain Hotshot firefighters walk past ceremonial firefighter boots and gear during a memorial honoring 19 fallen firefighters in Prescott Valley, Ariz., on Tuesday.
Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 4:56 pm

Thousands of firefighters are gathered in Prescott, Ariz., today, to honor the Granite Mountain Hotshots, the 19 firefighters who were killed by a wildfire on Sunday, June 30. The speakers include Gov. Jan Brewer and Vice President Joe Biden.

"These men were some of the strongest, most disciplined" people in the world, Biden said, calling them "an elite unit, in every sense of that phrase."

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:44 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

'Sputnik' Orbits A Russian City, Finding And Healing Tuberculosis

Nurse Marina Bogdanova, with Sputnik, gives medications to Sergei Gaptenko, who is close to finishing treatment for drug-resistant tuberculosis.
Konstantin Salomatin for NPR

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 8:33 am

Russia is confronting one of its most serious public health threats since the collapse of the Soviet Union. The threat is tuberculosis, but with a dangerous twist: Strains of the bacteria are widely circulating that are resistant to ordinary anti-TB drugs, and far harder to cure.

In parts of Siberia, nearly 30 percent of all tuberculosis cases aren't treatable by two of the most potent medications, the World Health Organization reported last year.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:19 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

California's Prison Sterilizations Reportedly Echo Eugenics Era

From 2006 to 2010, at least 148 female inmates at two California facilities had tubal ligation surgeries. Some of the surgeries took place at the Valley State Prison for Women, seen here in 2000.
Gary Kazanjian AP

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 5:16 pm

Nearly 150 women were sterilized in California's prisons without the state's approval, a practice that critics say targeted inmates who were seen as being at risk of serving a future jail term. Those numbers represent data from 2006 to 2010, according to the Center for Investigative Reporting, which first reported the news.

Read more
Shots - Health News
2:26 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Should Doctors Ask Older People If They Have Guns At Home?

Older men may have guns in the home that can pose a risk when people are depressed or not thinking clearly.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 5:49 pm

Older men are at high risk of suicide, and they're far more likely to kill themselves if they have access to firearms.

Doctors should ask relatives of older people with depression or cognitive problems if there are guns in the home, much as they might ask about whether it's time to take away the car keys, an academic paper says.

Read more

Pages