NPR Blogs

The Salt
8:03 am
Wed July 3, 2013

Coke Changed Caramel Color To Avoid Cancer Warning; Pepsi In Transition

Pepsi says it plans to reformulate all its colas sold in the U.S. by February 2014 to eliminate 4-MEI, a chemical listed as a carcinogen by the state of California.
PR Newswire

In 2011, the state of California created a problem for the soda industry.

The caramel color that Coke and Pepsi used to give colas that distinctive brown hue contained a chemical, 4-methylimidazole — 4-MEI — that is listed as a carcinogen by the state.

And in accordance with California's Proposition 65 law, the levels of 4-MEI found in sodas would have warranted a cancer warning label on every can sold in the state.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:21 am
Wed July 3, 2013

Book News: Authors Lose Class-Action Status In Google Books Case

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:01 am
Wed July 3, 2013

Egypt's President Morsi Is Ousted From Power By Military

Protesters gather at Tahrir Square. Morsi remained defiant as the military pressed the president and his political opponents to strike a compromise.
Amr Nabil AP

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 7:27 am

(Click here for most recent update: 7 p.m. ET.)

A huge celebration has begun in Egypt's Tahrir Square, after army chief Gen. Abdel Fattah al-Sisi proclaimed that Mohammed Morsi is out as president and the country's constitution has been suspended. The new plan calls for Egypt's chief justice to lead an interim government and set a date for early presidential elections.

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:39 am
Wed July 3, 2013

One Man's Quest To Make Medical Technology Affordable To All

Patients sit with their eyes bandaged at an Aravind Eye Care clinic in Madurai, India after cataract surgeries. Aravind performs more than 300,000 cataract surgeries annually.
Reinhard Krause Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 2:47 pm

David Green is a man on a mission to drive down the cost of medical devices and health services.

His tactic: Use market forces and slightly tweaked business strategies to make health care accessible to even the poorest people. And he's had some amazing success.

I caught up with Green (no relation to NPR's David Greene) at a company he is launching in Chicago that's taking on the high cost of hearing aids. He's demonstrating how to program his company's new hearing device on a cellphone.

Read more
The Salt
3:37 am
Wed July 3, 2013

Guess Who's Fighting To Keep Indiana Dry On Sundays?

Kyle Fronke inventories the wine in Kahn's Fine Wines and Spirits in Indianapolis last year. Only liquor stores in the state can sell cold beer, and on Sunday, practically all carry out alcohol sales are prohibited.
Darron Cummings AP

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 9:52 am

When you think summer, you might think of cold beer at a barbecue, maybe a bottle of wine with a Sunday picnic. A lot of people take it for granted that they can just go to the store and pick up alcohol.

Not in Indiana.

While many states have laws restricting liquor sales, Indiana is the only one where you can't buy packaged beer, wine and liquor on Sundays, and it's the only state that regulates alcohol sales based on temperature. Only liquor stores can sell cold beer.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:25 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Egypt's Morsi Says He Won't Step Down, Defies Army's Demand

Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi says he will not resign, despite a military demand that he reach a compromise with critics. Here, Morsi supporters take part in a drill during a demonstration in the suburb of Nasr City Tuesday.
Ed Giles Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 7:26 pm

Updated at 7:20 p.m. ET. Morsi Addresses The Nation:

In a broadcast speech Tuesday night, President Mohammed Morsi refused to step down, saying it would undermine the legitimacy of the country's constitution.

"Legitimacy is the linchpin for security," he said. "It is the only guarantee that no violence can be embraced."

Read more
The Two-Way
7:05 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Wildfire Season So Far: Tragic, Destructive And Below Average

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 9:13 am

It may seem like wildfire Armageddon out there, given the tragic deaths of 24 wildland firefighters this year, more than 800 homes and businesses burned to the ground, nearly 1.6 million acres scorched and over 23,000 blazes requiring suppression.

But as dramatic as it's been, the 2013 wildfire season has yet to kick into high gear.

"We have seen, overall, less fire activity so far this year," says Randy Eardley, a spokesman at the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise, Idaho.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:47 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Clapper Apologizes For Answer On NSA's Data Collection

Director of National Intelligence James Clapper has apologized for a "clearly erroneous" response to a question about surveillance on Americans. The question was asked before the Senate Intelligence Committee in March.
Susan Walsh AP

After telling Congress that the National Security Agency does not collect data on millions of Americans, National Intelligence Director James Clapper has issued an apology, telling Senate Intelligence Committee Chairwoman Dianne Feinstein that his statement was "clearly erroneous."

Read more
Shots - Health News
5:09 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Curing Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis In Kids Takes Creativity

Rukshona Saidova, 12, lives with both HIV and tuberculosis. She can't walk right now because the diseases have atrophied muscles in her legs.
Jason Beaubien NPR

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 9:07 pm

The world is struggling to cope with a growing epidemic of drug-resistant tuberculosis. Treatment is even more complicated for children.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:12 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

NASA Has Shut Down Space Telescope Orbiting Earth

"The Galaxy Next Door" — This composite image of the Andromeda galaxy was produced by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer, showing Andromeda's ultraviolet side. NASA sent a decommission command to the space telescope Friday.
NASA

NASA is sending a reliable servant into a retirement that will end with a fiery re-entry into Earth's atmosphere in about 65 years. That's the fate that awaits the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, the "galaxy hunter" space telescope whose original 29-month mission was extended to more than 10 years.

Along the way, the orbiting system, known as GALEX, helped scientists study how galaxies and stars are born, and how they change over time.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:26 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Off The Rails: Strike-Hit Bay Area Struggles With 'Horrible' Commutes

Frustrated commuters wait at the Transbay Temporary Terminal in San Francisco to catch a bus over to Oakland on Tuesday.
Alan Greenblatt NPR

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 6:44 pm

Andrea Brearley's kids really want to see Pixar while on vacation. The problem is that the family is staying in San Francisco, and with rail workers on strike, they're having a hard time figuring out how to get to the cartoon-maker's headquarters across the bay in Emeryville, Calif.

Brearley, who lives in Windsor, Ontario, says it's been "scary" trying to figure out an alternative route. "Three different people told me three different buses," she says.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:20 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Felony Arrest Of Student Who Bought Water Riles Many In Virginia

A college student spent the night in jail and was charged with felony counts after agents approached her car, suspecting she bought beer at this Harris Teeter grocery store in Charlottesville, Va.
Google

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 11:27 pm

"We're the police."

"This is bottled water."

If an encounter between several young women and Virginia's Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control agents had gone that smoothly, the participants might be looking back on a chance encounter as merely odd, perhaps even funny. Instead, they're coping with the aftermath of a brief flight from authorities that resulted in spending a night in jail and felony charges, now dropped, of hitting agents with a car. The state agency says it's reviewing the case.

Read more
The Salt
1:56 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

'Heart Attack On A Hook': Meet America's 'Worst Restaurant Meal'

Long John Silver's Big Catch platter will net you 33 grams of trans fats in one meal.
Courtesy of Clare Politano Center for Science in the Public Interest

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 12:19 pm

Seafood is generally considered a more healthful choice when dining out — but not if you're battering and deep-frying it and serving it up with hush puppies and onion rings.

And that is precisely why the folks at the Center for Science in the Public Interest, a nutrition and health policy watchdog group, have named Long John Silver's new "Big Catch" meal the worst restaurant meal in America.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:42 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

His Son Is 'A Modern Day Paul Revere,' Snowden's Father Says

Declaring that "you are a modern day Paul Revere; summoning the American people to confront the growing danger of tyranny and one-branch government," the father of "NSA leaker" Edward Snowden on Tuesday released an open letter to his son.

Read more
Krulwich Wonders...
1:02 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

Democracy, My Mother And Toast

Robert Krulwich NPR

When they proposed it in the 1770s, it was such a novel idea. That instead of a king anointed by God, instead of a sage, instead of one leader telling all of us what to do, we should, every four years, all of us, pick our own leader, who would serve for a season, and then, job done, gently depart.

Nothing like this had been tried for thousands of years. Somehow, together we would be wiser than a single king. We would lead ourselves.

In principle, democracy seems noble, beautiful even.

At my family dinner table, I wondered a little. More than a little.

Read more

Pages