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The Two-Way
8:00 am
Thu September 27, 2012

Netanyahu To Press For 'Red Line' On Iran

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 11:47 am

When Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu addresses the U.N. General Assembly today he will "argue for the need to set a 'red line' for Iran's nuclear program," Reuters reports.

NPR's Michele Kelemen adds that Netanyahu has "been urging the Obama administration to spell out clear red lines that would trigger military action" against Iran if it appears to be near to developing or acquiring nuclear weapons.

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The Two-Way
7:30 am
Thu September 27, 2012

We Have A Ruling: NFL Referees Are Returning To The Field

They'll be welcomed back by fans: Regular NFL refs will be on the job again starting tonight. (2006 file photo.)
Shaun Best Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Thu September 27, 2012 7:34 am

  • Mike Pesca and Steve Inskeep

The not-so-long, not-so-much of a national nightmare is over.

Regular NFL officials will be on the field starting with tonight's game now that the league and its referees union have reached tentative agreement on a new, eight-year contract.

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The Salt
3:39 am
Thu September 27, 2012

New Anti-Obesity Ads Blaming Overweight Parents Spark Criticism

A controversial ad by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota shows an overweight shopper and her daughter buying junk food.
courtesy Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota

Originally published on Thu September 27, 2012 4:50 am

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The Two-Way
6:17 pm
Wed September 26, 2012

Some Rental Computer Users Got More Than They Bargained For

Ever feel like someone is watching you? The Federal Trade Commission finds you could be right — if you've used a rental computer.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu September 27, 2012 9:12 am

Rent-to-own companies may have a right to use software to track the computers they lease out — and disable them remotely if a customer stops making payments.

But they don't have the right to spy on their customers, which is exactly what the Federal Trade Commission says took place. The agency found that the compromised data included everything from passwords to highly personal images.

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The Two-Way
5:59 pm
Wed September 26, 2012

What If Google Were Run By Replacement Engineers?

A spoof site launched by Erik Johnson pretends to offer Google's search engine — if it were run by replacements.
Replacement Google

Frustration over the NFL's not-ready-for-primetime replacement referees has inspired web designer Erik Johnson to present Google as if its search engine had replacement engineers at the controls. The result is a web page that looks a lot like the standard Google Search page — with a note that it is sponsored by the NFL.

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The Two-Way
5:18 pm
Wed September 26, 2012

UC OKs $1 Million Settlement In Pepper-Spray Suit

Nov. 18, 2011: Occupy protesters get sprayed at University of California Davis.
Thomas K. Fowler AP

Originally published on Thu September 27, 2012 6:44 am

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The Two-Way
5:10 pm
Wed September 26, 2012

Army Brigadier General Faces Sexual Misconduct Charges

Originally published on Thu September 27, 2012 7:42 am

Months after his sudden removal from his post in Afghanistan, Army Brig. Gen. Jeffrey Sinclair has been charged with multiple violations of the military's Uniform Code, ranging from wrongful sexual conduct to several rules violations.

For our Newscast desk, NPR's Tom Bowman reports that "Sinclair faces multiple counts of sexual misconduct and maltreatment of subordinates, as well as charges he violated orders by possessing alcohol and pornography while deployed."

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The Salt
3:51 pm
Wed September 26, 2012

Greek Credit Crisis Forces Winemakers, Food Canners To Adapt

Winemakers like Stellios Boutaris, shown near his vineyard outside Naoussa, Greece, and other business leaders have been forced to pursue new financial tactics because credit is hard to come by.
Jim Zarroli NPR

Originally published on Wed September 26, 2012 5:54 pm

When the economic crisis erupted in Greece and the bottom fell out of the domestic wine market, the Kir-Yianni vineyard outside picturesque Naoussa decided to adapt. Like other wineries in Greece, it has increasingly tapped the export market, successfully marketing and selling wine in Europe, the United States and even China.

"If you ask me, this crisis has been good for us," says Stellios Boutaris, the son of the company's founder. "It's going to make us stronger."

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Shots - Health Blog
3:27 pm
Wed September 26, 2012

Scientists Go Deep On Genes Of SARS-Like Virus

Cheryl Gleasner, a research technologist at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, works with a genome sequencing machine designed for disease surveillance. Since the SARS epidemic in 2003, advances in sequencing technologies have greatly speed up the ability to detect and track a new virus.
Ross D. Franklin AP

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 2:51 pm

When an unknown virus emerges, disease detectives turn to gene sequencers — not magnifying glasses — to identify the culprit.

So when a new type of coronavirus killed a man in Saudia Arabia and hospitalized another in the U.K., investigators got cracking.

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The Two-Way
3:22 pm
Wed September 26, 2012

Freddie Mac Didn't Harm Homeowners, Inspector General Says

In January, NPR and ProPublica reported on a potential conflict of interest at Freddie Mac, a mortgage giant sponsored by the federal government. The stories noted that even as Freddie Mac was writing rules making it harder for homeowners to refinance their mortgages, it also was stepping up investments in securities that gain when homeowners remain stuck in high-rate loans.

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The Two-Way
2:08 pm
Wed September 26, 2012

Babies Bring Good Luck, Big Bucks For One Norwegian Family

When an Oksnes plays Norway's lottery, he or she tends to have good luck.
Norsk Tipping

Forget four-leaf clovers, horseshoes and rabbit feet. The secret to a three-time-lottery-winning family in Norway is simple: getting pregnant.

Or, more accurately, making sure Hegge Jeanette Oksnes has recently given birth — or is just about to.

Last week, her brother, 19-year-old Tord Oksnes, won 12.2 million kroner ($2.12 million) and became the latest member of the Oksnes family to win Norway's national lottery — a few months after his sister gave birth to her third child.

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The Two-Way
1:36 pm
Wed September 26, 2012

Young Man Who Helped Capture Gadhafi Dies After Being Tortured

Friends and relatives of Omran Ben Shabaan carried his coffin Tuesday after it arrived as the airport in Misrata, Libya.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 26, 2012 1:58 pm

A year ago, Omran Ben Shaaban was among the young men who helped capture Moammar Gadhafi as the former Libyan leader tried to hide in a drainage ditch.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
1:09 pm
Wed September 26, 2012

Looking For Answers Beyond The Cosmic Horizon

This spectacular image of the large spiral galaxy NGC 1232 was obtained by the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (VLT) in 1998. NGC 1232 sits in the constellation Eridanus (The River) at a distance of about 100 million light-years and is about twice the size of the Milky Way galaxy.
ESO

Where does the Universe end? Or, to put it differently, does the Universe have an edge? When cosmologists say that the Universe is expanding, people tend to think of an exploding bomb. They see galaxies as shrapnel, flying off in all directions. Even if intuitive, this image is dead wrong.

The cosmic expansion is an expansion of space itself. Since Einstein's theory of general relativity, space has been endowed with a plasticity that allows it to expand, shrink or fold like a rubber balloon in response to the presence of matter (and energy).

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Shots - Health Blog
12:40 pm
Wed September 26, 2012

Knee Replacements Are All The Rage With The Medicare Set

Ouch!
Ken Tannenbaum iStockphoto.com

Spend a little time where seniors hang out and there's a good chance you'll hear about somebody getting a new knee — maybe two.

Some figures pulled from Medicare data analyzed in the latest JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association, help explain why.

There are about 600,000 knee replacements a year now, at a cost of around $15,000 a piece. All told, the tab for all that orthopedic work is about $9 billion a year, the JAMA study says.

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