National

Law
5:05 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Jury Begins Deliberations In George Zimmerman Case

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 6:19 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. A jury in Sanford, Florida is beginning deliberations in the electric and closely watched trial of George Zimmerman. Zimmerman is charged with second degree murder and manslaughter in the killing of unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin. He's pleaded not guilty. He said he acted in self defense. We have two reports now on the trial and preparations outside the courtroom.

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Code Switch
4:21 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Awkwardly Awaiting The Zimmerman Trial's Outcome

George Zimmerman wipes his face after arriving in the courtroom for his trial in Sanford, Fla., on Friday. Zimmerman is charged in the 2012 shooting death of unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin.
Joe Burbank AP

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 4:40 pm

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Shots - Health News
3:59 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Texas Abortion Fight Is Just One Of Many This Year

Opponents of a state abortion bill circle its supporters in Austin, Texas, in early July.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 4:15 pm

The eyes of the nation may be on Texas, as legislators fight over whether to impose strict new regulations on abortion and those who provide it. But a report on abortion laws and regulation across the country finds that the Lone Star State isn't alone.

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The Salt
2:58 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

How Much Arsenic Is Safe In Apple Juice? FDA Proposes New Rule

The FDA's proposal follows concerns raised by consumer groups about levels of inorganic arsenic, a carcinogen, in apple juice.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 6:19 pm

Here's some news for parents of the sippy-cup crowd: The Food and Drug Administration has proposed a 10 parts-per-billion threshold for levels of inorganic arsenic in apple juice. This is the same level set by the EPA for arsenic in drinking water. Right now, there is no FDA standard for apple juice.

Now, we've told you about the brouhaha over trace levels of arsenic commonly found in apple juice before.

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The Two-Way
1:55 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Teen Who Died In Asiana Crash Was Hit By A Firetruck, Police Say

Debris left behind by the crash-landing of Asiana Flight 214, released by the NTSB this week. Police officials say a teenager who died at the airport was hit by a fire truck on the runway; she had been covered by firefighters' foam.
NTSB

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 2:28 pm

One of the two Chinese teenagers who died in the crash-landing of an Asiana Airlines flight Saturday was hit by a firetruck responding to the scene on the runway, police officials in San Francisco said Friday. But it remains uncertain if that accident is what killed the girl.

The girl, Ye Meng Yuan, 16, was planning to visit Stanford University and attend a summer camp at a Christian school, The San Francisco Chronicle reports.

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Monkey See
1:37 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

BuzzFeed Identifies Red Flag Favorite Books, Which Is A Red Flag

BuzzFeed's Joseph Bernstein says that liking these books always, without exception, universally indicates a red flag. We take issue.
iStockphoto.com

As is a pretty common happening on the internet now, there's a new BuzzFeed article going around. The headline is a random and arbitrary number followed by some nouns, and the article itself is a numbered list of pictures, animated GIFs, and perhaps as many as 100 words or so.

This week's entry: Joseph Bernstein's July 9 screed, 28 'Favorite' Books That Are Huge Red Flags.

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Television
1:23 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Back For More: Sorkin's 'Newsroom' Is A Serious Standout

Jeff Daniels returns to Aaron Sorkin's HBO series The Newsroom as cable news anchor Will McAvoy.
HBO

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 2:44 pm

The one major change series creator Aaron Sorkin made to The Newsroom between seasons was a structural one. Instead of having each week's show focus on a separate major storyline, this year's edition of The Newsroom follows a single story over the course of the entire season. And it's a season-long plot line in which anchor Will McAvoy and the other employees of the fictional Atlantic Cable News network get one important news report very wrong.

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Business
12:48 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Does The Canadian Rail Explosion Make Pipelines Look Safer?

A police photograph shows burned and wrecked crude oil carrying rail tankers piled up in Lac-Megantic, Quebec, on Monday. Dozens of people died in the disaster.
EPA/Landov

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 1:48 pm

When an oil-laden train derailed last weekend, it turned into an inferno that killed dozens in Lac-Megantic, a small town in Quebec.

This week, the Canadian tragedy is morphing into something very different. It is becoming Exhibit A in the political case for building pipelines — as well as for opposing them.

How could the same tragedy prove opposite points? Listen in to the debate:

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Shots - Health News
12:40 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

3-D Casts So Cool That You'll Almost Want To Break A Bone

The waterproof material of the Cortex cast may hold up better in high-stress areas, such as hands.
Courtesy of Jake Evill

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 9:11 am

Anybody who has ever worn a cast knows that it can really cramp your style. You itch. After a while, you stink. At times, it seems like the cast needs even more care than you do. Keep it dry or else!

Other than the addition of garish colors of fiberglass, there hasn't been much innovation in cast technology in what seems like forever. But down in New Zealand, designer Jake Evill is bringing the latest in 3-D printing to orthopedics.

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The Salt
12:12 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Heavy Rains Send Iowa's Precious Soil Downriver

Soil erosion after five inches or more of rain fell in one hour across portions of Western Iowa in 2013.
USDA Natural Resources Conservation

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 1:33 pm

What a difference a year makes. Last year at this time, the Midwest was heading into one of the worst droughts in decades. Now much of the region is soggy.

But the biggest loser from this year's heavy rains? The land itself.

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Around the Nation
12:05 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

'Can't Even See The Sky': Ex-Prisoner On Solitary Confinement

Thousands of California prisoners are waging a hunger strike, protesting conditions in the prisons. For more on the strike and the prisoners' demands, host Michel Martin talks with Los Angeles Times Reporter Paige St. John and former inmate Jerry Elster, of Legal Services for Prisoners with Children.

The Two-Way
10:43 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Homeland Security Secretary Napolitano Is Stepping Down

Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano.
Kevin Dietsch UPI/Landov

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 1:14 pm

(Click here for latest updates.)

Saying the post has been "the highlight of my professional career," Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano announced Friday morning that she is stepping down to become president of the University of California.

Her statement followed a Reuters report that broke the news.

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Monkey See
10:10 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Pop Culture Happy Hour: The Big Three

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

Back in the summer of 2010, we sat down to do our very first Pop Culture Happy Hour. We talked about Community, Wipeout, Doctor Who, and Netflix streaming. And now, three years later, we sit down for our 147th episode — which is, appropriately enough, all about the number three.

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Digital Life
10:09 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Protecting Your Online Privacy

With the NSA conducting surveillance on our data and Google scanning our email, how can we protect our personal information? Jon Xavier, digital producer at Silicon Valley Business Journal, discusses the services that you can use to make your information more secure and private.

Health
10:09 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Surf's Up for Pathogenic Viruses and Bacteria, Too

A day at the shore can leave beachgoers with more than a sunburn — a gulp of seawater can expose swimmers to disease-causing microbes like norovirus, salmonella, and adenovirus. Marine scientist Rachel Noble and environmental medicine researcher Samuel Dorevitch discuss the risk, and what's being done to limit swimmers' exposure.

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