National

Religion
12:21 pm
Fri July 5, 2013

From Deep In The Bible Belt, Pastor Looks For 'Hope After Faith'

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 1:13 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Now it's time for Faith Matters. That's the segment on this program when we talk about issues of religion and spirituality in our lives. And today, we focus on the absence of faith.

(SOUNDBITE OF JERRY DEWITT SPEECH)

JERRY DEWITT: I realized I was standing on a rock. Yes, my friends, there was a rock and it was a rock of reason. I want you to understand that today you're changing the future. You're making life better. And there is hope after faith. Can I get a Darwin?

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U.S.
12:21 pm
Fri July 5, 2013

Understanding Migrants Through The Things They Carried

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, preachers serve as spiritual guides for their flocks, but what happens when a preacher loses his own faith? We'll talk with one man who knows what that's like in just a few minutes. But first, anthropologists and archaeologists, of course, study the way that groups live throughout history.

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Economy
12:21 pm
Fri July 5, 2013

Four Years On, Economic Recovery Still Sluggish

June job numbers are out, and the unemployment rate is still 7.6%. As the U.S. enters its fifth year of recovery, guest host Celeste Headlee asks Sudeep Reddy of the Wall Street Journal where we go from here.

Health
12:03 pm
Fri July 5, 2013

Can White Blood Cells Spread Cancer?

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 1:55 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. White blood cells are part of our body's defense system. Their job is to attack invaders, and one of the first white blood cells sent out is the neutrophil. These neutrophils put out a trap to capture and destroy the invaders. But here's where it gets interesting, because in a new study, researchers say they have shown that these nets might actually activate and spread the cancer cells. It's the exact opposite of what you want. But there may be a way to counteract this problem.

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Monkey See
11:57 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Pop Culture Happy Hour: 'The Heat' Is On, So Come On Down

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

With apologies for an abbreviated post this week (I'm actually not at the office; I am invisible!), we bring you a show all about The Heat, the buddy comedy starring Melissa McCarthy and Sandra Bullock, which — hey! — we really liked, along with much of the rest of the universe. We'll talk about the comedy, the weird idea that a hit starring these particular actresses is a "surprise" hit, the script that made us laugh, and lots more.

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Shots - Health News
10:42 am
Fri July 5, 2013

How Sunscreen Can Burn You

Don't get near that grill with the spray-on sunscreen.
Lisa Thornberg iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 2:25 pm

That sunscreen you dutifully spray throughout the day could actually get you burned.

We're not talking sunburn. We're talking people bursting into flames because they're wearing sunscreen.

Last year, the Food and Drug Administration recorded five incidents in which people were burned after their sunscreen caught on fire. One person was hurt after lighting a cigarette. Another stood near a citronella candle.

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All Tech Considered
8:54 am
Fri July 5, 2013

At Tech-Free Camps, People Pay Hundreds To Unplug

Camp Grounded is located in Northern California.
Courtesy of Scott Sporleder

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 12:17 pm

The overwhelming and endless stream of electronic alerts and messages on our computers, phones and tablets is driving demand for a new kind of summer camp for adults. "Technology-free" camps that force their campers to surrender their gadgets, wallets and that nagging "fear of missing out" — FOMO — are booking up fast.

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Around the Nation
7:06 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Boy Saved From Drowning By Woman Posing For Engagement Photo

Becki Salmon and her fiancé were posing on the banks of a fast-moving creek in a Philadelphia park. That is until a five-year-old boy started drowning right behind them, reports WPVI TV. Salmon, who's a trained lifeguard, jumped into the water and saved the boy.

Around the Nation
4:51 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Prescott's July 4 Celebrations Honor Fallen Firefighters

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 5:39 am

For the nearly 700 firefighters trying to smother the Arizona blaze that killed 19 of their own on Sunday, July 4th was another day on the hill. An interagency investigation team was collecting evidence to figure out what went wrong. And in nearby Prescott — home to the Granite Mountain Hotshots — the town went ahead with its holiday celebration.

Around the Nation
4:51 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Crowd Relishes Hot Dog Eating Contest

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 5:31 am

It wouldn't be the Fourth of July holiday without a hot dog eating contest. The 38th Nathan's Hot Dog Eating Contest was held on Coney Island Thursday. Joey Chestnut won the men's division and Sonya Thomas was the women's champion.

Around the Nation
4:51 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Boston Celebrates Its Role In America's Independence With HarborFest

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 5:28 am

Boston, the birthplace of the American Revolution, has kicked off its summer with HarborFest. The annual event provides work for lots of unemployed actors, who get to show off their faux British accents while wearing red-coat costumes. Other actors get to be revolutionaries in tri-cornered hats.

Media
4:51 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Louisville TV Station Promises Not To Hype Breaking News

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 5:42 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In local television news, one of the most basic ways to appeal to viewers is the constant promise of breaking news. As NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik reports, one station in Louisville, Kentucky is taking a different approach and it's beginning to win attention for it.

DAVID FOLKENFLIK, BYLINE: The spot is for WDRB television in Louisville.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SPOT)

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Education
4:51 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Education Reform Movement Learns Lesson From Old Standards

Advocates for Common Core standards say it will be harder for states to hide their failing schools.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 10:08 am

Common Core — the new set of national education standards in math and English language arts — will take effect in most states next year. This move toward a single set of standards has been embraced by a bipartisan crowd of politicians and educators largely because of what the Common Core standards are replacing: a mess.

In years past, the education landscape was a discord of state standards. A fourth grader in Arkansas could have appeared proficient in reading by his state's standards — but, by the standards of another state, say Massachusetts, not even close.

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On Aging
2:06 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Seniors Flex Creative Muscles In Retirement Arts Colonies

Buster Sussman, 86, shown with his art instructor, Randall Williams, is a former real estate reporter who only recently started painting. His paintings were on display at the Burbank Senior Artists Colony.
Ina Jaffe NPR

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 4:51 am

Some famous writers, painters and musicians have done some of their best work in their later years — impressionist Claude Monet, for one. But at the North Hollywood Senior Arts Colony, older people are proving that you don't have to be famous — or even a professional artist — to live a creatively fulfilling life in old age.

With a fully equipped theater and painting and sculpture studios, there seems to be rehearsals or exhibitions of some sort going on here all the time.

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StoryCorps
1:39 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Two Brothers Remember Lives Spent With Liberty

The Bizzaro brothers — James, 81 (left) and Paul, 82 — spent their childhoods living in a house right behind the Statue of Liberty.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 4:51 am

Brothers Paul and James Bizzaro, both in their 80s, spent their childhoods living in a house right behind the Statue of Liberty. Their family moved to the same small island in New York Harbor as Lady Liberty 75 years ago this summer, not long after their father, also James, became a guard at the statue.

When the Bizzaros moved to what's now called Liberty Island in 1937, Paul was 8 and James was 6.

"Half of the island was for the visitors. The half that we lived in, we had that whole half to us," says James.

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