National

NPR Story
11:44 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Revisiting News Coverage Of The Battle Of Gettysburg

Front page of the Saturday Evening Post from June 1863. (Courtesy of the Saturday Evening Post)

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 10:22 am

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NPR Story
11:40 am
Tue July 2, 2013

FAA Changes Urged After 5 Near Airline Collisions

A Virgin America flight prepares to land at McCarran International Airport, March 2012, in Las Vegas. (Julie Jacobson/AP)

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 10:22 am

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has issued recommendations to the Federal Aviation Agency to change its air traffic control procedures.

The NTSB found that current rules for planes that abort a landing create “hazardous conflicts and introduce unnecessary collision risk.”

The NTSB investigated five near mid-air collisions at commercial airports and found that the rules create the possibility for mid-air collisions and leave pilots without any guidance from air-traffic control.

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Monkey See
11:32 am
Tue July 2, 2013

'Big Brother' Isn't Just A Terrible Show, It's A Wasted Opportunity

Houseguest Judd makes a toast during the season premiere of Big Brother.
Cliff Lipson CBS

Here's how Big Brother works.

Producers throw a bunch of people into a house, where they're stuck for about three months. All day and all night, they're watched by cameras, and they can be watched online — these are the so-called "live feeds," which are sort of like watching the security cameras in the most boring juice bar in Los Angeles. (I wrote about touring the house in 2010; it's very creepy.)

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NPR Story
11:20 am
Tue July 2, 2013

St. Louis’ Famous Dish: Toasted Ravioli

Toasted ravioli at Villa Farotto in St. Louis, Missouri. (Jeremy Hobson/Here & Now)

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 10:22 am

New York is famous for its hotdogs. Chicago has its deep dish pizza. And St. Louis is known for its toasted ravioli — ravioli that’s covered in breadcrumbs and deep fried.

Here & Now host Jeremy Hobson visits Villa Farotto to taste the regional dish.

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NPR Story
11:15 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Sifting Through Wildfire Ashes For Memories, Hope

Samaritan's Purse volunteers work in a house. (Megan Verlee/Colorado Public Radio)

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 10:22 am

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Shots - Health News
11:10 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Savory And Sweet: A Taste For Infertility

Humans have long relied on the sense of taste in the struggle to survive and multiply. A bitter taste alerts us to a plant that may be poisonous. A sweet taste tells us that a plant is likely high in calories and can help sustain us.

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NPR Story
10:53 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Investigation Into 19 Firefighters’ Deaths Begins

Prescott and other area department firefighters embrace during a memorial service, Monday, July 1, 2013 in Prescott, Ariz. for the 19 Granite Mountain Hotshot Crew firefighters who were killed Sunday, when an out-of-control blaze overtook the elite group. (Julie Jacobson/AP)

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 10:22 am

Last night, the community of Prescott, Ariz., gathered in Fire Station Number 7 to mourn the deaths of 19 members of the Granite Mountain Interagency Hotshot Crew, which was based in Prescott.

The firefighters died battling the Yarnell Hills fire, which continues to rage.

Officials have launched an investigation into how the firefighters were killed and whether their deaths could have been prevented.

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NPR Story
9:53 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Ohio Power Plants Respond To New Regulations

The Painesville, Ohio, power plant recently turned 125 years old. It still burns coal to produce electricity, though operators expect to complement Painesville power production with wind and hydropower in the near future. (Brian Bull/WCPN)

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 10:22 am

Last week President Obama announced that he is directing the Environmental Protection Agency to crack down on air pollution from coal-powered utility plants.

As part of a more aggressive stance to curb climate change, federal regulators will now write carbon emission standards for existing plants, as well as any built in the future.

In Ohio, coal operators are generally opposed to the new regulations. But the response from some power plant operators has been more muted.

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Monkey See
9:02 am
Tue July 2, 2013

To The Dump, To The Dump, To The Dump Dump Dump: Write Us A Lone Ranger Joke

Milos Luzanin iStockphoto.com

This morning, as I perused the headlines, I saw a few items about the new Lone Ranger movie, and rather than being struck by interesting thoughts about the racial politics of Johnny Depp's Tonto, I abruptly remembered this joke: "Where does the Lone Ranger take his trash?" "To the dump, to the dump, to the dump dump dump." You know, because of the music?

And then I thought, "Who built the Lone Ranger's luxury apartment building?"

"Donald Trump, Donald Trump, Donald Trump Trump Trump."

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Around the Nation
7:20 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Sign Maker Misspells Florida, Twice

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 8:36 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene. Florida's Department of Transportation ordered a new sign for Interstate 95. It read: Exit 344, University of Florida, Florida State College South Campus. Only one issue. Both times, Florida was spelled wrong. It read: Flordia. The sign manufacturer in Arkansas made that mistake. According to First Coast News, the company has agreed to fix the sign for free. They also might want to get off at that exit and head back to school.

Around the Nation
5:03 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Nation Grieves After Arizona Firefighting Tragedy

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 8:36 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

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Law
4:45 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Boston Jury Learns How Case Against Bulger Was Built

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 8:36 am

After 16 years on the lam, Boston mobster James "Whitey" Bulger is on trial. His murder and racketeering trial is expected to last through the summer. Already testimony from government witnesses is raising questions about the justice system, and how the FBI cozied up to villainous characters to prosecute Bulger.

Television
4:45 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Local TV Stations Snapped Up In Buying Sprees

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 8:36 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

The Chicago-based Tribune Company, newly out of bankruptcy, is trying to sell off its newspaper holdings. Yet even as the company withdraws from print media, it's making a big push into local television, following the lead of other major media players.

NPR's David Folkenflik reports

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Business
4:45 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Former Energy Secretary Wants Power Generation Decentralized

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 8:36 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

President Obama announced, last week, a hugely ambitious plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and push the country towards cleaner energy. Right now, just nine percent of our energy consumption comes from renewable sources.

Former U.S. secretary of energy Steven Chu would like to see us get to 50 percent by the middle of the century. Chu left the cabinet in April, but even before that, he began talking to utility companies could adopt a radically different business model.

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Politics
4:45 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Texas Democrats See Opportunity In Changing Demographics

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 8:36 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

All week, we are looking at demographic changes in the currently very red, very Republican Lone Star state. Democrats hope the growing size and potential voting clout of the Latin population will turn Texas blue.

Whether that happens or not, the Texas Democratic Party already bears little resemblance to what it looked like when it last dominated Texas politics decades ago.

NPR's Don Gonyea brings us the latest in our series Texas 2020.

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