National

Arts & Life
3:06 am
Mon May 20, 2013

Nostalgia For Sale As Captain Kangaroo's Pals Are Auctioned Off

More than 500 items from the Captain Kangaroo show — including Dancing Bear's life-sized costume.
Nate D. Sanders Auction House

Originally published on Mon May 20, 2013 10:38 am

The classic children's show Captain Kangaroo aired on TV for nearly 30 years, starting in 1955. After its creator and star, Bob Keeshan, died in 2004, his estate donated a few of his beloved hand puppets to the Smithsonian.

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:04 am
Mon May 20, 2013

If Your Shrink Is A Bot, How Do You Respond?

Ellie is a computer simulation designed to engage real people in meaningful conversation and take their measure. The computer system looks for subtle patterns in body language and vocal inflections that might be clues to underlying depression or other emotional distress.
YouTube

Originally published on Mon May 20, 2013 5:19 pm

Read more
Health
3:03 am
Mon May 20, 2013

Bans Of Same-Sex Marriage Can Take A Psychological Toll

Opponents of same-sex marriage participate in the March for Marriage in Washington, D.C., on March 26, as the Supreme Court hears arguments on California's Proposition 8 ban on same-sex marriage.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 20, 2013 9:25 am

As the country awaits two important Supreme Court decisions involving state laws on same-sex marriage, a small but consistent body of research suggests that laws that ban gay marriage — or approve it — can affect the mental health of gay, lesbian and bisexual Americans.

Read more
Around the Nation
3:01 am
Mon May 20, 2013

Seeing The (Northern) Light: A Temporary Arctic Retirement

The Botnen-Chen family moved from Boston to live for a year on Rødøy, a Norwegian island north of the Arctic Circle.
Courtesy of Winston Chen

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 11:10 pm

By all the laws of anything, Winston Chen should not have quit his well-paying, midcareer job at a software company at age 40. But one day he was watching a TED Talk, one of those popular online video presentations, delivered by a New York designer.

"He presented this absolutely irresistible idea," Chen says. "He said, 'Why don't we take five years out of retirement and spread them throughout your working life?' "

Read more
Around the Nation
4:58 pm
Sun May 19, 2013

Boom Or Bust? Saving Rhode Island's 'Superman' Building

The iconic Industrial Trust Tower, knows as the "Superman building," stands in downtown Providence, R.I. The art deco-style skyscraper, the tallest in the state, lost its last tenant when the bank's lease expired in April.
Steven Senne AP

Originally published on Mon May 20, 2013 11:30 am

Rhode Island is home to beautiful beaches, top-notch universities and a thriving arts scene. Beneath the surface, however, the state faces challenges similar to other parts of the country: shrinking revenues, lost jobs and general economic malaise.

Read more
Around the Nation
4:58 pm
Sun May 19, 2013

Remembering The Long Lost Germans Of Texas

Originally published on Sun May 19, 2013 6:18 pm

More than a century ago, German settlers found a pocket of Texas to call home between Austin and San Antonio. And once the local lingo merged with their own language, it proved to be an interesting dialect. Weekends on All Things Considered host Jacki Lyden speaks with University of Texas professor Hans Boas, who has been archiving the last remaining speakers of this unique blend.

The Salt
8:05 am
Sun May 19, 2013

Giant Renaissance Food People Descend Upon New York

Vertumnus, Arcimboldo's portrait of Emperor Rudolph II
Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Tue May 21, 2013 4:30 pm

It takes a lot of chutzpah to reduce one of the most powerful men on Earth to a pile of fruits and vegetables.

Luckily for art lovers, Giuseppe Arcimboldo had nerve to spare.

Arcimboldo created this unorthodox produce portrait of Holy Roman Emperor Rudolph II back in 1590. By that time, the Italian artist had been painting for the emperor and his powerful Habsburg family for more than 25 years, so presumably, they'd grown used to his visual jokes. (The emperor has "peachy" cheeks and "ears" of corn, get it?)

Read more
Around the Nation
5:41 am
Sun May 19, 2013

Turmoil Of '63 Shut Down Proms; Former Students Dance Again

Originally published on Sun May 19, 2013 2:11 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

There were countless sacrifices made during the Civil Rights movement, in Birmingham, Ala. And for African-American students graduating high school during a particularly turbulent year, one of those sacrifices was their prom. But this past Friday, hundreds of members of the Class of 1963 got to have their night, 50 years later. From Birmingham, Gigi Douban has the story.

GIGI DOUBAN, BYLINE: They arrived at the Boutwell Auditorium in downtown Birmingham, in stretch limos. Some came from Atlanta and Detroit.

Read more
Author Interviews
5:41 am
Sun May 19, 2013

Stories Of Hope Amid America's 'Unwinding'

Originally published on Sun May 19, 2013 2:11 pm

According to New Yorker writer George Packer, there used to be a kind of deal among Americans — a deal in which everyone had a place.

"People were more constrained than they are today, they had less freedom," he says, "but they had more security and there was a sense in which each generation felt that the next generation would be able to improve itself, to do better."

Read more
Mental Health
5:27 pm
Sat May 18, 2013

Alzheimer's Cases Rise, But Hope Remains

Amy Goyer moved back to Phoenix to look after her father, Robert, when he began to show signs of Alzheimer's. He is just one of 5 million Americans living with the disease.
Sarah Brodzinski

Originally published on Sat May 18, 2013 7:47 pm

More than 5 million Americans are currently living with Alzheimer's disease, and the National Institute on Aging estimates that that number is going to triple by 2050 — in part due to aging baby boomers.

The cost of coping with the disease — currently estimated at $215 billion — is projected to rise to half a trillion dollars by 2050. That amount will likely tax our overburdened health care system, the economy and the families of those affected.

Amy Goyer realized her 84-year-old father Robert's health was deteriorating one night while watching a movie with him.

Read more
Around the Nation
4:42 pm
Sat May 18, 2013

Impossible Choice Faces America's First 'Climate Refugees'

The 350 residents of Newtok, Alaska, will soon be the country's first "climate refugees." The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says the village is likely to be underwater in just four years.
Richard Sprenger The Guardian

Originally published on Sun May 19, 2013 5:59 am

Climate change is a stark reality in America's northernmost state. Nearly 90 percent of native Alaskan villages are on the coast, where dramatic erosion and floods have become a part of daily life.

Perched on the Ninglick River on the west coast of the state, the tiny town of Newtok may be the state's most vulnerable village. About 350 people live there, nearly all of them Yupik Eskimos. But the Ninglick is rapidly rising due to ice melt, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says the highest point in the town — a school — could be underwater by 2017.

Read more
Commentary
2:35 pm
Sat May 18, 2013

Astronaut Chris Hadfield's Most Excellent Adventure

After a half-year mission at the International Space Station, Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield lands in central Kazakhstan on Tuesday.
Sergei Remezov AFP/Getty Images

Chris Hadfield went from feeling truly sublime to faintly ridiculous this week.

Read more
Code Switch
11:44 am
Sat May 18, 2013

'Scandal': Preposterous, Unmissable, Important

Kerry Washington from ABC's Scandal is shown on a TV monitor as an iPad displays the show page.
Frazier Moore AP

Originally published on Sat May 18, 2013 2:15 pm

OK, let's get this out of the way: Scandal is a ridiculous show.

The hit ABC drama about a Washington "fixer" named Olivia Pope just wrapped up its second season with one of its trademark cliffhangers.

(Assume spoilers, y'all.)

Read more
Shots - Health News
8:38 am
Sat May 18, 2013

The Unsafe Sex: Should The World Invest More In Men's Health?

A man smokes a cigarette as he takes a break at a fruit market in Hyderabad, India. Smoking tobacco is eight times more prevalent among Indian men than women.
Noah Seelam AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 20, 2013 5:20 pm

On average, men aren't as healthy as women.

Men don't live as long, and they're more likely to engage in risky behaviors, like smoking and drinking.

But in the past decade, global health funding has focused heavily on women.

Programs and policies for men have been "notably absent," says Sarah Hawkes from the University of London's Institute of Global Health.

Read more
Monkey See
5:13 am
Sat May 18, 2013

Working Women On Television: A Mixed Bag At Best

Geena Davis played the president in the 2005 ABC series Commander in Chief. Now, she works on issues involving women in media.
Kent Eanes AP

Originally published on Mon May 20, 2013 1:33 pm

When actress Geena Davis was watching children's shows with her daughter a few years ago, she became so troubled by the lack of female representation, she started a think tank on gender in the media. The Geena Davis Institute recently partnered with University of Southern California professors to conduct a study analyzing gender roles and jobs on screen.

The good news? Prime-time television's pretty decent at depicting women with careers.

Read more

Pages