National

Alt.Latino
1:13 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Te Odio, Te Amo: Why Telenovelas Rule Latin Entertainment

Cuna de Lobos (Cradle of Wolves) is one of the most iconic telenovelas of all time.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 8:35 am

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The Two-Way
12:45 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Cleveland Kidnapper Sentenced To Life Plus 1,000 Years

Ariel Castro appears in court during the sentencing phase on Thursday in Cleveland. Castro pleaded guilty last week to 937 counts, including kidnapping, rape and aggravated murder.
Tony Dejak AP

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 2:58 pm

This post was updated at 1:40 p.m. ET

Michelle Knight, who was raped and tortured during more than a decade of captivity, faced her abuser, Ariel Castro, in court on Thursday, assuring him that while her hell was over, his had just begun.

"I spent 11 years in hell; now your hell is just beginning," she said, addressing Castro, who admitted to abducting Knight, Amanda Berry and Gina DeJesus, and subjecting them to years of sexual and emotional abuse in his Cleveland home.

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Shots - Health News
12:16 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Want To Be A Morning Person? Take A Few Tips From Campers

All in the name of science: Volunteers hike in Colorado during their one-week hiatus from electrical lighting.
Courtesy of Kenneth Wright

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 2:07 pm

In the first episode of Downton Abbey, the Countess of Grantham, played by Maggie Smith, complains about the newfangled electrical chandelier installed in her family's 1915 estate. "Oh, dear, such a glare," she says, shielding her eyes with a fan.

The countess may have a point.

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U.S.
12:12 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Are Bad Background Checks Costing Jobs?

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 4:30 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. In a few minutes, we'll hear from the former Commerce Secretary in the George W. Bush administration, Carlos Gutierrez. He's organized a group of high-powered Republican donors to press for immigration reform. He says immigration is a boon to the economy and we'll hear more of his argument in just a few minutes.

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Politics
12:12 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

Former Commerce Secretary: Doing Nothing On Immigration Is 'De Facto Amnesty'

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 4:30 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now we turn to immigration and the debate within the Republican Party over the issue. Republican leaders, including Florida Senator Marco Rubio, are pressing the party to embrace a comprehensive immigration plan. But many House Republicans want to increase border security first and are wary of any policy that could create a path to citizenship for the millions of immigrants who are currently in the country without proper authorization. Now, a new group is hoping to tip the balance. It's called Republicans for Immigration Reform.

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Television
12:12 pm
Thu August 1, 2013

A Drama-Free Show For Black Women?

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 4:30 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now we want to tell you about a new TV program that's hoping to bring new relevance to TV talk. The show is called "Exhale," it's on the ASPiRE network. That's a television network created by NBA legend Magic Johnson, to serve primarily African-American viewers. On the show, a panel of accomplished women talk about everything from health and fitness to sex and relationships.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "EXHALE")

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The Two-Way
10:33 am
Thu August 1, 2013

Beset San Diego Mayor Says He Didn't Get Harassment Training

San Diego Mayor Bob Filner announced at a news conference last week that he intended to seek professional help for sexual harassment issues.
Bill Wechter Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 3:41 pm

San Diego Mayor Bob Filner, accused by at least eight women of sexually harassing them, never received a mandated training course on sexual harassment from the city, according to his attorney.

Harvey Berger says the city failed to meet its legal requirement and therefore should foot the mayor's legal bills. Filner and the city of San Diego are being sued by the mayor's former communications director, Irene McCormack Jackson.

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Shots - Health News
10:06 am
Thu August 1, 2013

When Fleeing Zombies (Or Flu), Cooperation Saves Lives

Best to check with the neighbors and the health department if commuting during zombie attacks.
AMC-TV

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 12:01 pm

How will humans survive the zombie apocalypse? Will it be each man for himself or will a coordinated effort be what saves us from ultimate doom?

An MIT professor is trying to answer this question for us mortals. "There is a price that society pays if everyone determines his behavior selfishly," Ruben Juanes says. And this cost of selfish behavior is what game theorists call the price of anarchy.

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Pop Culture
5:39 am
Thu August 1, 2013

'Brony' Convention Takes Off Like Magical Winged Pony

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 10:23 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

In the '80s, My Little Pony was a toy line and TV franchise aimed at little girls. Well, today an expanding group of grown men are fans of the pastel-colored ponies. They call themselves Bronies. This weekend, thousands are heading to Baltimore for BronyCon 2013. There'll be music inspired by My Little Pony, Brony Dance-offs, even some academic pony panels. BronyCon began two years ago with a hundred attendees. Like a magical flying pony, the thing's taking off,

Business
3:03 am
Thu August 1, 2013

Firm Hopes 'Owning Nashville' Will Pay Off For Investors

A new fund trading on the New York Stock Exchange will allow investors to put money in companies that all call Nashville home. The manager's of the fund hope to expand the project to other cities.
Walter G. Arce CSM /Landov

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 10:23 am

There's a hot stock tip floating around Nashville, and it's a first-of-its-kind investment fund that begins trading on the New York Stock Exchange Thursday.

The fund is a collection of stocks in publicly traded companies that have one thing in common: the city they call home.

When people buy into the Nashville Area Exchange Traded Fund — which starts trading at $25 a share — they will essentially be placing a bet based on an area code.

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Business
3:02 am
Thu August 1, 2013

As Back-To-School Shopping Begins, Consumers May Turn Frugal

Chris Viehland helps her daughter Jenna try on shoes for the new school year at a Famous Footwear store in Fenton, Mo., Aug. 9, 2012.
Christian Gooden MCT/Landov

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 6:01 pm

As August begins, retailers are stepping up sales promotions to attract back-to-school shoppers. And several states are offering tax-free shopping to encourage purchases.

But most economists say this year's sales will be slower than last summer's because consumers have been coping with more expensive gasoline and higher payroll taxes.

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Code Switch
3:01 am
Thu August 1, 2013

To '60s Civil Rights Hero, Math Is Kids' Formula For Success

Bob Moses works with Jennifer Augustine, Guitoscard Denize, Darius Collins and other students who are part of this Algebra Project classroom. It's one of several student cohorts across the country where students who've struggled with math get to college-level by the end of high school.
Christopher Connelly NPR

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 6:01 pm

Bob Moses is 78, but he has the same probing eyes you see behind thick black glasses in photos from 50 years ago when he worked as a civil rights activist in Mississippi. The son of a janitor, Moses was born and raised in Harlem. He's a Harvard-trained philosopher and a veteran teacher.

He started a math training program — the Algebra Project — with a MacArthur "Genius Grant" 30 years ago. The goal is simple: Take students who score the worst on state math tests, double up on the subject for four years and get them ready to do college-level math by the end of high school.

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Books
3:00 am
Thu August 1, 2013

How Andrew Carnegie Turned His Fortune Into A Library Legacy

Carnegie ultimately gave away $60 million to fund a system of 1,689 public libraries across the country. "In bestowing charity the main consideration should be to help those who help themselves," he wrote.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 4:03 pm

Andrew Carnegie was once the richest man in the world. Coming as a dirt poor kid from Scotland to the U.S., by the 1880s he'd built an empire in steel — and then gave it all away: $60 million to fund a system of 1,689 public libraries across the country.

Carnegie donated $300,000 to build Washington, D.C.'s oldest library — a beautiful beaux arts building that dates back to 1903. Inscribed above the doorway are the words: Science, Poetry, History. The building was "dedicated to the diffusion of knowledge."

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The Two-Way
8:52 pm
Wed July 31, 2013

Sold! First Parcels Auctioned For Future Offshore Wind Farms

The offshore wind farm in the North Sea near Borkum, Germany, is nearly complete. The Riffgat facility, seen here on June 23, includes 30 turbines, each with a generating capacity of 3.6 megawatts.
David Hecker Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 2, 2013 6:01 pm

A Rhode Island company was the highest bidder in the federal government's first-ever auction for the right to build an offshore wind farm.

After 11 rounds, Deepwater Wind outbid two other companies for two patches of ocean off the coasts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. The winning bid was $3.8 million.

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Around the Nation
6:45 pm
Wed July 31, 2013

Twice Rejected, LGBT Group Won't Give Up On Boy Scout Bid

Senicka Arciaga-Spears (left), with his siblings and mothers, Kelly and Eliza. Senicka hopes to join the Boy Scouts if the Utah Pride Center's troop charter application is accepted.
Terry Gildea KUER

Seventh-grader Senicka Arciaga-Spears wants to be a Boy Scout. Over a homemade Sunday evening dinner, he tells his two moms, Eliza and Kelly, that he wants to learn survival skills — including fishing and "dangerous hiking."

Eliza would like her son to join the Scouts, too. "They teach discipline and obedience and respect and self-sufficiency. I want that for him," she says. "I want him to learn those things and be surrounded by those things."

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