National

Politics
6:09 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

Sunnylands: Where Movie Stars And Presidents Play (And Work)

President Bill Clinton with Walter and Leonore Annenberg at the entrance of the historic estate on Feb. 14, 1995.
White House The Annenberg Foundation Trust at Sunnylands

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 5:38 pm

President Obama arrives in Rancho Mirage, Calif., on Friday to spend two days with China's new president, Xi Jinping, at a 200-acre estate called Sunnylands.

The house at Sunnylands is built of lava stone. The private golf course includes a pink pagoda. And if the presidents feel like fishing in one of the property's 11 lakes, they will hardly be the first world leaders to dip a line in the water.

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The Two-Way
6:02 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

Tropical Storm Andrea Makes Landfall In Florida

The National Hurricane Center's tracking system placed Tropical Storm Andrea on Florida's Gulf coast, level with Gainesville, Thursday afternoon. The storm is expected to spread rain and strong winds along the Southeastern coast tonight and Friday.
National Hurricane Center

Tropical Storm Andrea has made landfall on Florida's Big Bend area, the National Hurricane Center in Miami reports. As of 5:45 p.m. ET, the center's tracking system placed the storm on the state's Gulf coast, level with Gainesville. Andrea is expected to spread rain and strong winds along the Southeastern coast tonight and Friday.

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Around the Nation
4:39 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

Mysterious Blob Hovers Over Local Ala. Weather Radar

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 5:38 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

This past Tuesday, in Huntsville, Alabama, something unusual appeared on the local weather radar.

(SOUNDBITE OF NEWSCAST)

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Well, it is the blob that ate Huntsville. On radar, at least.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: A giant angry-looking red spot. It caught the attention of all...

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Science
4:39 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

Girl's Need Breathes Life Into Debate Over Organ Allocation

Sarah Murnaghan, on May 30, as she and her parents marked the 100th day of her stay in Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
Murnaghan family AP

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 5:38 pm

The case of a Pennsylvania girl who is dying from cystic fibrosis has sparked an emotional debate over how the nation allocates lungs for transplantation.

Ten-year-old Sarah Murnaghan is in intensive care at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia awaiting a lung transplant. Under the current rules, lungs from adults are offered to other adults and adolescents before being offered to children younger than 12.

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Around the Nation
4:39 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

Michigan Congressman To Become Longest-Serving Member

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 5:38 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Now, a Washington figure who's been around longer than some of the monuments in this city and who is, himself, a living monument on Capitol Hill. Democratic Representative John Dingell, Jr. of Michigan, who is 86 years old, was first elected to the House of Representatives in 1955, and he has been there even since.

Tomorrow, he will surpass the late Senator Robert Byrd's record for congressional longevity when he achieves the tenure of 57 years, five months, and 26 days in Congress.

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Around the Nation
4:39 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

Contradictions Between Iowa, Illinois Show Uneven Employment

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 5:38 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

Tomorrow morning, the Labor Department will release its latest data on jobs. Results can vary dramatically from state to state, even among states right next to each other.

Mike Moen of member station WNIJ has this story about booming Iowa and hard-hit Illinois.

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Shots - Health News
4:18 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

Even A Small Change In Habits Helps Fend Off Stroke

Your brain will appreciate even a modest improvement in stroke risk factors.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 5:07 pm

This is not one of those posts that is going to beat you up for doing a crummy job exercising, eating better and all the other things you're failing to do to ward off death.

Instead, this post is here to say that if you improve one thing just one teeny bit, it's going to lower your risk of having a stroke. So pick something, and stick to it.

Stroke, which happens when a blood vessel bursts or is blocked in the brain, is a leading cause of death and disability.

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The Two-Way
4:12 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

Baby Moose Benefits From Anglers' Unlikely Catch And Release

Dr. Karen Sciascia of Red Hill, Pa., holds a baby moose she and Four Rivers Fishing Co. guide Seth McLean rescued from a river in southwestern Montana, in a photo taken just before they released the animal on the bank where its mother waited.
Four Rivers Fishing Co. AP

Dr. Karen Sciascia of Red Hill, Pa., has delivered thousands of babies in her career. But on a vacation to Montana this week, she helped deliver another life from danger, as she and her fishing guide saved a baby moose that was separated from its mother as they crossed a river.

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Monkey See
3:51 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

When 'G' Movies Are For Kids, Do Kids Avoid 'G' Movies?

The 1939 film The Wizard Of Oz was rated G. The 2013 film Oz the Great and Powerful was rated PG. The difference? Maybe a little violence and a womanizing leading man.
AP/Walt Disney Pictures

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 5:38 pm

If you're a parent with small children, summer is traditionally a time when there's lots for them to see at the multiplex. That's not untrue this summer. But if you're specifically looking for a film with a G rating, you may just be out of luck.

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Monkey See
2:24 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

Joss Whedon's 'Much Ado' As Romantic Comedy And Cop Show

Amy Acker as Beatrice eavesdrops in a scene from Joss Whedon's new film version of Much Ado About Nothing.
Roadside Attractions

If you all think back all the way to when I was in Toronto last fall, you'll recall I was very enamored with Joss Whedon's Much Ado About Nothing, the story of the bickering lovers Beatrice and Benedick. And now, months later, this morning, he was on Morning Edition to talk about it with NPR's Renee Montagne.

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Author Interviews
2:02 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

The Patient Who Let Us Peek Inside A Brain In 'Present Tense'

In her latest book about Henry Molaison, Corkin tells the story of the amnesic man she studied for a half-century, whose brain helped teach neuroscientists about the distinctions between memory and intellect.
Basic Books

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 5:03 pm

In 1953, 27-year-old Henry Gustave Molaison underwent an experimental brain surgery in an attempt to alleviate his severe epileptic seizures. The surgery left him with a form of amnesia; he could remember many things from the past, but was unable to form new memories.

"He could tell us about where he was born, [that] his father's family was from Thibodaux, La., his mother came from Ireland," says neuroscientist Suzanne Corkin. "He talked about the towns in Hartford where he lived and about his specific neighbors. He knew the schools he attended, some of his classmates' names."

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The Two-Way
1:46 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

Christie Names N.J. Attorney General To Be Interim Senator

New Jersey Attorney General Jeffrey Chiesa is going to be New Jersey's interim senator — filling the seat vacated Monday by the death of Democrat Frank Lautenberg.

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Monkey See
1:38 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

The Vexing Matter Of The Summer Blockbuster

In Iron Man 3, Robert Downey Jr. reprises his role as Tony Stark (aka Iron Man), and Gwyneth Paltrow reprises hers as his girlfriend, Pepper Potts.
Paramout Pictures

On today's Here & Now from WBUR, I talked to host Robin Young about the weird situation of summer blockbusters — which can easily go the way of Iron Man 3 (hit!) or the way of After Earth (non-hit!) and it's not always easy to tell what you're going to get until it happens.

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The Salt
12:36 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

Feeling A Little Blue May Mask Our Ability To Taste Fat

Feeling down? It could be messing with your ability to taste the fat in that carton of ice cream.
Heather Rousseau NPR

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 4:00 pm

So, here's the scenario: You're feeling a little blue, then you watch an emotional movie and dig into a bowl of ice cream.

Are you aware of how fattening your comfort food is? Likely not. Especially in the moment.

A new study finds that temporary, strong emotions, like the sadness we experience from a weepy movie, can significantly decrease our ability to taste — or perceive — the amount of fat we're eating.

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The Two-Way
12:24 pm
Thu June 6, 2013

In Letter To Senators, DoJ Explains How Secret Court Works

A man takes a photograph with his cell phone of names on the walls of "Empty Sky Memorial" at Liberty State Park in Jersey City, New Jersey. The concrete and steel memoria pays tribute to the 746 citizens of New Jersey who lost their lives on Sept. 11.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 2:32 pm

Back in October of 2011, then-Assistant Attorney General Ronald Weich wrote a letter to Sens. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) and Mark Udall (D-Colo.) concerning section 215 of the USA Patriot Act.

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