National

Monkey See
10:37 am
Mon April 13, 2015

The Hapless 'Veep' Staff Trips Itself Up As Selina Ascends

Julia Louis-Dreyfus as Selina Meyer on HBO's Veep.
Patrick Harbron HBO

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 1:02 pm

One of the central conceits of the first season of HBO's Veep was the carnival of humiliations suffered by Selina Meyer, played so brilliantly by Julia Louis-Dreyfus, in her capacity as vice president. She battled for relevance while waiting for the phone to ring, surrounded by a staff even more determinedly clinging to shreds of power and significance than she was. Later, Selina wound up battling primary opponents in her own bid to become president — a path that proved to have its own endless frustrations.

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Goats and Soda
10:25 am
Mon April 13, 2015

After Global Protests, Kenyan Court Sentences 3 Men Who Raped Teen

In March, demonstrators in Nairobi demanded tougher punishment for assailants of women and girls.
Anadolu Agency Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 7:53 pm

At 16, Liz was beaten and repeatedly raped, then thrown unconscious into a pit latrine in Busia County, in Western Kenya. The local police doled out their own brand of "punishment": They ordered the assailants to cut the grass at the police station.

But after millions of people around the world petitioned for a stronger punishment, a trial began last year. And on Monday, three of her assailants were sentenced to 15 years in prison.

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Around the Nation
7:18 am
Mon April 13, 2015

Waiting Reporters Receive Pizzas From Hillary Clinton Team

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 8:00 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Around the Nation
7:18 am
Mon April 13, 2015

Police In Rural Washington State Find Stolen Cabin

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 8:00 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Politics
6:25 am
Mon April 13, 2015

2016 Presidential Field Expands; Obama Returns From Americas Summit

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 8:00 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Sports
6:23 am
Mon April 13, 2015

NHL Aims To Include More Minority Players To Expand Fan Base

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 8:00 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Around the Nation
6:02 am
Mon April 13, 2015

1912 Tree Helps Park Service Determine Cherry Blossoms' Peak

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 8:00 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
5:01 am
Mon April 13, 2015

Marco Rubio Expected To Announce Presidential Bid

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 8:00 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
4:56 am
Mon April 13, 2015

21-Year-Old Jordan Spieth Wins Masters Golf Tournament

Last year's champion, Bubba Watson, helps Jordan Spieth put on the iconic green jacket Sunday at the 79th Masters Golf Tournament at Augusta National Golf Club.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 12:02 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
4:56 am
Mon April 13, 2015

SuperPACS Are Back And They Are More Powerful Than Ever

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 8:00 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Politics
4:40 am
Mon April 13, 2015

Rubio's Path To The Nomination, And 3 Obstacles In His Way

Marco Rubio celebrates onstage with his family in 2010 after winning his U.S. Senate seat in Florida when he was just 39 years old. Now, he's expected to embark on a run for president.
Alan Diaz AP

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 7:09 am

Marco Rubio, the charismatic, Hispanic, young (and even younger-looking) freshman senator from Florida is launching his campaign for the White House Monday in Miami.

Rubio, 43, will be entering a growing field of candidates. Right now, he's considered a second-tier candidate, polling behind Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, the man Rubio has called a mentor.

That could change once he gets in. Rubio's advisers believe he has a path to the nomination, with assets few other candidates can match.

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Around the Nation
3:32 am
Mon April 13, 2015

What We Talk About When We Talk About Gay Marriage

The small town of Wahpeton, N.D., is one of the places where conversations on same-sex marriage are playing out in schools, churches and families.
Maggie Penman NPR

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 10:27 am

This week, Morning Edition is taking a look at the attitudes about gay rights in North Dakota, one of 13 states that still bans same-sex marriage.

Wahpeton, N.D., is about an hourlong drive from Fargo, through vast, empty farmland that's brown and yellow this time of year. It will look very different soon — farmers are already out on their tractors preparing for the planting season.

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Shots - Health News
3:30 am
Mon April 13, 2015

Why Some Doctors Hesitate To Screen Smokers For Lung Cancer

This spiral CT image of the chest shows a large malignant mass (purple) in one lung. A conventional chest X-ray could have missed this tumor, radiologists say.
Medical Body Scans Science Source

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 10:39 pm

In February, Medicare announced that it would pay for an annual lung cancer screening test for certain long-term smokers. Medicare recipients between the ages of 55 and 77 who have smoked the equivalent of a pack a day for 30 years are now eligible for the annual test, known as a spiral CT scan.

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Business
3:29 am
Mon April 13, 2015

In Pennsylvania, Employment Booms Amid Oil And Natural Gas Bust

Students at the Pennsylvania College of Technology are learning a technique called "tripping pipe," moving a pipe from a stack into a horizontal position and lowering it down into a well. The students train on a practice drilling rig to learn how to be roustabouts.
Jeff Brady NPR

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 8:00 am

Lower oil and natural gas prices have the petroleum industry laying off tens of thousands of workers. It looks like a decade-long trend of job growth in the U.S. oil business may end.

But there are parts of the country where those job numbers are still rising. Pennsylvania is one of them.

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Around the Nation
3:29 am
Mon April 13, 2015

For Some Superstorm Sandy Victims, The Government Wants Its Money Back

Liz Treston received thousands of dollars from FEMA and the Small Business Administration after Superstorm Sandy destroyed her basement. Two years later, FEMA demanded more than $4,000 of that money back.
Alex Welsh for NPR

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 1:28 pm

As the rain and wind swirled outside the window during Superstorm Sandy more than two years ago, Liz Treston's family helped her into bed.

Treston, 54, was disabled in a diving accident when she was in her 20s. She uses a wheelchair to get around her Long Island, N.Y., home and an electronic lift machine to get into her bed. The night the storm hit, she wanted to be ready for sleep in case the power went out.

Under the covers, she listened as water rushed into her basement, pouring over the appliances and furniture she kept down there.

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Shots - Health News
3:27 am
Mon April 13, 2015

The Hidden Cost Of Mammograms: More Testing And Overtreatment

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 8:00 am

There's no question mammograms can save lives by detecting breast cancer early. But they can also result in unnecessary testing and treatment that can be alarming and costly.

In fact, each year the U.S. spends $4 billion on follow-up tests and treatments that result from inaccurate mammograms, scientists report in the current issue of Health Affairs.

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Around the Nation
5:25 pm
Sun April 12, 2015

20 Years Later, Sabotage Of Amtrak's Sunset Limited Still A Mystery

Federal investigators search for evidence at the scene of the Amtrak Sunset Limited wreckage near Hyder, Ariz., the day after the derailment.
Eric Drotter AP

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 11:33 am

The mystery goes back 20 years.

It was an ordinary, cross-country train trip back in 1995: Amtrak's Sunset Limited passenger train, bound for Los Angeles from Miami.

The train never reached its destination: It was sabotaged, derailed in the Arizona desert.

The investigation continues to this day: On Friday, at the FBI field office in Phoenix, Assistant Special Agent in Charge Mark Cwynar announced a $310,000 reward for information leading to the arrest of those who derailed the Sunset Limited.

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Poetry
5:25 pm
Sun April 12, 2015

I Saw The All-Stars Of Our Generation Honor Allen Ginsberg's 'Howl'

Poet Allen Ginsberg reads his poem "Howl" outside the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington, D.C., Oct. 19, 1994, before a hearing on the constitutionality of a FCC policy restricting indecent material.
Dennis Cook AP

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 3:05 pm

Sixty years ago in San Francisco, Allen Ginsberg penned a poem that opened with the now-famous lines:

I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked,
dragging themselves through the negro streets at dawn looking for an angry fix ...

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History
5:25 pm
Sun April 12, 2015

Discovery Gives New Ending To A Death At The Civil War's Close

An engraving depicts Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's surrender to Union Gen. Ulysses S. Grant in Appomattox, Va.
Library Of Congress

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 8:02 pm

For decades, the story of Hannah Reynolds' death read like a tragedy of historical circumstance.

In 1865, Reynolds was a slave in the household of Samuel Coleman in the Virginia village of Appomattox Court House. And as Union and Confederate troops fought the Battle of Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865, a cannonball tore through the Coleman house.

The Coleman family had left the day before, but Reynolds had stayed behind. The cannonball struck her in the arm and, it was thought, she died that same day, as the battle's only civilian casualty.

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Music
5:25 pm
Sun April 12, 2015

Karen Haglof, No-Wave Guitarist Turned Doctor, Relaunches Music Career

Originally published on Sun April 12, 2015 6:43 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ARUN RATH, HOST:

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It's All Politics
3:50 pm
Sun April 12, 2015

Hillary Clinton, Polarizing Or Misunderstood, Jumps Into Race For President

Hillary Clinton has described herself as the most famous person you don't really know. And as she launches into her second presidential campaign, she'll be reintroducing herself to voters who largely think they have her figured out.
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 4:14 pm

Hillary Clinton officially launched the campaign everyone has been expecting for months — years, really. She's running for president and to finally break open that glass ceiling she famously said her last campaign put "18 million cracks" in.

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The Two-Way
3:44 pm
Sun April 12, 2015

It's Official: Hillary Clinton Announces Presidential Run

Hillary Clinton announces her candidacy.
Hillary Clinton campaign

Originally published on Sun April 12, 2015 4:26 pm

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton announced today that she is seeking the Democratic presidential nomination for the 2016 election.

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The Two-Way
11:01 am
Sun April 12, 2015

Stephen Hawking Covers Monty Python's 'Galaxy Song'

Stephen Hawking flying through the universe in a new video of Monty Python's Galaxy Song.
Monty Python YouTube

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 9:01 am

Has life gotten you down?

Do things seem hard or tough?

We might have just the antidote: Stephen Hawking covering Monty Python's "Galaxy Song."

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The Two-Way
9:26 am
Sun April 12, 2015

Australia To Stop Payments To Families Who Refuse Child Vaccinations

Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott looks during a news conference at Parliament House in Canberra, Australia, last month. Abbott announced Sunday that his government would close a loophole to discourage families from refusing childhood vaccinations.
Lukas Coch EPA/Landov

Originally published on Tue April 14, 2015 1:25 pm

Updated at 12:50 p.m. ET

Australia has announced plans to halt welfare payments and child care rebates to families that refuse to have their children vaccinated — an aggressive move aimed at clamping down on a rising number of parents who opt out of immunizations.

Prime Minister Tony Abbott said Sunday that the government was closing a loophole and would stop payments of up to $11,500 per child (15,000 Australian dollars) for parents who don't get their kids immunized by claiming to be "conscientious objectors."

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Around the Nation
9:02 am
Sun April 12, 2015

Better Than 'Survivor': Wild Drama Hooks Viewers On Nest Web Cams

One of the two female ospreys that scuffled over the male on the Boulder County, Colo., nest web cam.
Boulder County

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 10:37 am

Fans of Boulder County's osprey nest cam saw a bit of drama last season.

Two females and a male were living in the nest, when a third female arrived and kicked the original female out. Observers said she bonded with the male.

"People called it ... the 'home-wrecker osprey,' " says Nik Brockman, Boulder County's web specialist.

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Mental Health
8:28 am
Sun April 12, 2015

Working Through Depression: Many Stay On The Job, Despite Mental Illness

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 12:53 pm

When a pilot crashed a Germanwings plane into a mountainside in the French Alps last month, one word kept coming up over and over in the media coverage: depression. What did the airline know about the pilot's mental health, and what was he required to tell them?

Of course, being depressed is a very different thing from wanting to take the lives of others. But experts we talked with said that an event like this one — a violent act carried out by someone with a mental illness — increases the stigma for everyone with mental illness.

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Goats and Soda
8:06 am
Sun April 12, 2015

Jonas Salk's Polio Vaccine Makes A Comeback

A health worker injects a vaccine to prevent polio and measles in Lahore, Pakistan.
K.M. Chaudary AP

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 7:38 pm

The injectable polio vaccine marks its 60th birthday Sunday. For many people, it seems like a relic — isn't the oral version, not the injectable, the vaccine that's supposed to end polio within a few years?

But after being eclipsed by the oral polio vaccine, the injectable version has made a quiet comeback in some developed countries, including the U.S. And now the vaccine introduced by physician Jonas Salk in 1955 is re-emerging on the global level. Health experts believe it is key to eliminating the disease in the developing world.

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Shots - Health News
8:03 am
Sun April 12, 2015

What Could Go Wrong When Doctors Treat Their Own Kids?

Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 5:55 pm

Famed doctor and medical educator William Osler once said, "A physician who treats himself has a fool for a patient."

What, I wonder, does that say about us doctors who treat our own kids?

This past winter, my daughter got the flu. She was miserable: daily fevers, achiness, sore throat, stuffy head and nausea with a total loss of appetite.

We didn't run a flu test on her, which you can do with a quick nasal swab at a doctor's office. Since my wife and I are both docs, we were comfortable that her symptoms fit the diagnosis.

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Around the Nation
7:25 am
Sun April 12, 2015

On Steel Horses They Ride — To Honor 19th-Century Cavalries

Reverend Jeff Moore blesses a biker at the Buffalo Soldiers Motorcycle Club rally in San Jose, Calif.
Leila Day KALW

Originally published on Sun April 12, 2015 11:01 am

In the mid- and late 1800s, the Buffalo Soldiers were all-black cavalries and regiments deployed to patrol and protect what would eventually become America's national parks.

Their moniker was said to have been given to the cavalries by Native Americans who thought the soldiers' hair resembled the woolly texture of a buffalo.

It's a name that carries a lot of pride — and one that lives on today. But instead of horses, today's Buffalo Soldiers ride bikes.

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Race
7:25 am
Sun April 12, 2015

Cop Shooting Victim's Family Calls For Calm In South Carolina

Originally published on Sun April 12, 2015 11:01 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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