National

Around the Nation
6:39 am
Thu February 7, 2013

Rep. Labrador Could Shape House Plan On Immigration

Originally published on Thu February 7, 2013 3:07 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Let's explore a key point of debate over changing immigration law. President Obama is pushing to change the status of millions of people in the United States illegally.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: We all agree that these men and women should have to earn their way to citizenship. But for comprehensive immigration reform to work, it must be clear from the outset that there is a pathway to citizenship.

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Around the Nation
6:39 am
Thu February 7, 2013

Postal Service To End Saturday Mail Delivery

Originally published on Thu February 7, 2013 3:07 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The U.S. Postal Service likes to talk about how reliable it is, and they are determined to keep that reputation, even after the change announced yesterday. The Postal Service plans to end Saturday delivery of regular mail. They will continue delivering packages on Saturdays. The decision will save some $2 billion a year, but it's getting mixed reviews, as NPR's Brian Naylor reports.

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Politics
6:39 am
Thu February 7, 2013

Pentagon To Off Some Benefits to Gay Spouses

Originally published on Thu February 7, 2013 3:07 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On a Thursday, it's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. As soon as today, the Pentagon could announce it is extending some benefits to spouses of gay and lesbian service members. The move comes two years after the repeal of the policy known as "don't ask, don't tell." Since nine states and Washington, D.C. allow same-sex marriage, the Pentagon has struggled with whether and how to recognize these spouses. NPR's Ari Shapiro reports.

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Sports
6:39 am
Thu February 7, 2013

Rare Brooklyn Atlantics Baseball Card Sells At Auction

Originally published on Thu February 7, 2013 3:07 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Here's the reason that more than 100 people gathered at an auction house near Portland, Maine last night. They came to see a show of sorts. Serious bidders were there to take their shot at owning one of the oldest baseball cards in existence in America.

Maine Public Radio's Jay Field watched the bidding.

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Shots - Health News
3:31 am
Thu February 7, 2013

Silica Rule Changes Delayed While Workers Face Health Risks

A worker makes a cut in the side of a sandstone block at the Cleveland Quarries facility in Vermilion, Ohio, earlier this month. The legal limit on the amount of silica that workers can inhale was set decades ago.
Ty Wright Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 7, 2013 3:07 pm

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Around the Nation
6:01 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Questions Sprout Up Over Razed California Wildlife Reserve

The Sepulveda Basin Wildlife Reserve after the land was stripped by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Several advocates, including elected leaders, are protesting the move.
Courtesy of Mathew Tekulsky

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 7:23 pm

Just a stone's throw from two of Los Angeles' busiest freeways lies the Sepulveda Basin Wildlife Reserve, a unique spot in an urban jungle.

The northern portion of the reserve is adorned with 30-foot-tall cottonwood trees, spots of coyote bush and other plants. Native plants cover 50 percent of the nature spot, says Kris Ohlenkamp with the San Fernando Valley Audubon Society.

"On the other side it was significantly more than that," he says.

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It's All Politics
5:18 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Even In Blue Minnesota, Gun Control Seems A Tough Sell

Gun rights advocate Andy Cers of Minneapolis listens to testimony during a Minnesota House hearing on gun violence bills Tuesday in St. Paul.
Jim Mone AP

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 8:36 pm

Minnesota has a Democratic governor, two Democratic senators, and Democrats control both houses of its Legislature. So it may have come as no surprise when President Obama went there earlier this week to rally support for his proposals to reduce gun violence.

But even in the politically blue state, there's considerable resistance to placing further restrictions on gun ownership.

During his visit to a Minneapolis police facility Monday, Obama urged Minnesotans to find common ground in curbing gun violence.

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Shots - Health News
5:05 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Defying Expectations, GOP Governors Embrace Medicaid Expansion

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder, a Republican, favors a federally subsidized expansion of Medicaid in his state.
Carlos Osorio AP

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 5:07 pm

Top-ranked archrivals Michigan and Ohio State faced off Wednesday night on the basketball court for the second time in this season (Michigan won in overtime to split the series).

But both states' Republican governors have something more in common this week than an intense distaste for their neighboring state's athletic team.

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Around the Nation
4:43 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Judge May Not Cut Amish Hair-Shearing Culprits A Break

An Amish man and woman walk through a parking lot after leaving the U.S. courthouse in Cleveland in September. Sixteen members of an Amish group in Bergholz, Ohio, led by Samuel Mullet, were found guilty of attacks targeting Amish bishops.
Mark Duncan AP

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 6:12 pm

Members of an Amish church group who were convicted of committing hate crimes against other Amish will be sentenced Friday in U.S. District Court in Cleveland.

The 16 parishioners were found guilty last September of shearing the beards and hair of their perceived enemies in an effort to shame their victims.

Bittersweet Nuptials

The sequence of events has shaken Lizzie Miller and other Amish across Eastern Ohio, where the assaults took place.

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NPR Story
4:38 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Boy Scouts Delay Decision On Allowing Openly Gay Scouts, Leaders

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 6:12 pm

The Boy Scouts' executive board delayed a decision on gay membership until May.

U.S.
4:38 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Bank Robberies On The Decline As Risk Outweighs The Rewards

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 6:12 pm

Audie Cornish talks to Jack Nicas, staff reporter at the Wall Street Journal, and why bank robberies have been on the decline.

Governing
4:36 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Senator: Cutting Postal Service 'Should Be A Last Resort'

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 6:12 pm

Robert Siegel talks to Senator Susan Collins, (R-Maine) about the Postal Service announcement that it will stop delivering letters and other mail on Saturdays, but continue to handle packages. The struggling agency said the move would save about $2 billion annually as it looks for ways to cut cost.

Around the Nation
4:36 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Congress May Not Let Postal Service End Saturday Mail Delivery

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 6:12 pm

The U.S. Postal Service announced Wednesday that it plans to end Saturday delivery later this year. The Postal Service lost more than $15 billion in fiscal year 2012 and it is under great pressure to reduce those losses.

Shots - Health News
4:28 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Debate Rages On Even As Research Ban On Gun Violence Ends

More than 400 guns, including these three, were turned in during a Dallas gun buyback program in January. But determining the effectiveness of such programs is difficult due to limits on gun-related research.
Tom Pennington Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 6:12 pm

The characteristics of gun violence in the U.S. are largely unknown because key federal health agencies have been banned from conducting such research since the mid-1990s.

President Obama, however, wants to change that.

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NPR Story
4:27 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

South Dakota Tribes Accuse State Of Violating Indian Welfare Act

Derrin Yellow Robe, 3, stands in his great-grandparents' backyard on the Crow Creek Reservation in South Dakota. He was taken off the reservation by South Dakota's Department of Social Services in July 2009 and spent a year and a half in foster care before being returned to his family.
John Poole NPR

Originally published on Thu February 7, 2013 11:35 am

For years now, council members of the Crow Creek Sioux Tribe in South Dakota have watched as the state's Department of Social Services removed children from the reservation and placed many of them in white foster homes, far from tribal lands. Many of the children were later adopted, losing their connection to their families and heritage.

"I've seen it firsthand," says Brandon Sazue, chairman of the Crow Creek tribe.

Sazue says the state has long overstepped its authority.

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