National

Around the Nation
4:43 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Judge May Not Cut Amish Hair-Shearing Culprits A Break

An Amish man and woman walk through a parking lot after leaving the U.S. courthouse in Cleveland in September. Sixteen members of an Amish group in Bergholz, Ohio, led by Samuel Mullet, were found guilty of attacks targeting Amish bishops.
Mark Duncan AP

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 6:12 pm

Members of an Amish church group who were convicted of committing hate crimes against other Amish will be sentenced Friday in U.S. District Court in Cleveland.

The 16 parishioners were found guilty last September of shearing the beards and hair of their perceived enemies in an effort to shame their victims.

Bittersweet Nuptials

The sequence of events has shaken Lizzie Miller and other Amish across Eastern Ohio, where the assaults took place.

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NPR Story
4:38 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Boy Scouts Delay Decision On Allowing Openly Gay Scouts, Leaders

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 6:12 pm

The Boy Scouts' executive board delayed a decision on gay membership until May.

U.S.
4:38 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Bank Robberies On The Decline As Risk Outweighs The Rewards

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 6:12 pm

Audie Cornish talks to Jack Nicas, staff reporter at the Wall Street Journal, and why bank robberies have been on the decline.

Around the Nation
4:36 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Congress May Not Let Postal Service End Saturday Mail Delivery

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 6:12 pm

The U.S. Postal Service announced Wednesday that it plans to end Saturday delivery later this year. The Postal Service lost more than $15 billion in fiscal year 2012 and it is under great pressure to reduce those losses.

Governing
4:36 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Senator: Cutting Postal Service 'Should Be A Last Resort'

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 6:12 pm

Robert Siegel talks to Senator Susan Collins, (R-Maine) about the Postal Service announcement that it will stop delivering letters and other mail on Saturdays, but continue to handle packages. The struggling agency said the move would save about $2 billion annually as it looks for ways to cut cost.

Shots - Health News
4:28 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Debate Rages On Even As Research Ban On Gun Violence Ends

More than 400 guns, including these three, were turned in during a Dallas gun buyback program in January. But determining the effectiveness of such programs is difficult due to limits on gun-related research.
Tom Pennington Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 6:12 pm

The characteristics of gun violence in the U.S. are largely unknown because key federal health agencies have been banned from conducting such research since the mid-1990s.

President Obama, however, wants to change that.

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NPR Story
4:27 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

South Dakota Tribes Accuse State Of Violating Indian Welfare Act

Derrin Yellow Robe, 3, stands in his great-grandparents' backyard on the Crow Creek Reservation in South Dakota. He was taken off the reservation by South Dakota's Department of Social Services in July 2009 and spent a year and a half in foster care before being returned to his family.
John Poole NPR

Originally published on Thu February 7, 2013 11:35 am

For years now, council members of the Crow Creek Sioux Tribe in South Dakota have watched as the state's Department of Social Services removed children from the reservation and placed many of them in white foster homes, far from tribal lands. Many of the children were later adopted, losing their connection to their families and heritage.

"I've seen it firsthand," says Brandon Sazue, chairman of the Crow Creek tribe.

Sazue says the state has long overstepped its authority.

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The Two-Way
4:13 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Game On! Rare 1865 Baseball Card Sold For $80,000

The Library of Congress' version of the rare Brooklyn Atlantics baseball card.
Library of Congress

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 11:46 am

Update at 8:06 p.m. ET. Card Sells For $80,000

The nearly 150-year-old Brooklyn Atlantics baseball card that was was discovered late last year in a photo album bought at a yard sale has sold for $80,000 — $92,000 if you count the auction house's buyer's premium.

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Around the Nation
4:02 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Shooting Of 'American Sniper' Raises Questions About PTSD Treatment

Chris Kyle, a retired Navy SEAL and best-selling author of American Sniper: The Autobiography of the Most Lethal Sniper in U.S. Military History, was killed at a gun range near Glen Rose, Texas, on Feb. 2.
Paul Moseley MCT/Landov

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 6:12 pm

Police in Texas have charged Eddie Ray Routh, a 25-year-old U.S. Marine reservist, with capital murder. Arrest records indicate that Routh had been twice taken to a mental hospital in recent months, and had told police he was suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder.

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U.S.
3:59 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

As Drought Intensifies, 2 States Dig In Over Water War

Harlan County Lake, the Republican River's main reservoir in Nebraska, dropped 10 feet during the summer drought and hasn't recovered.
Grant Gerlock

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 7:28 pm

Epic water battles are the stuff of history and legend, especially in the West. And as a severe drought drags on in the Midwest, a water war is being waged over a river that irrigates agriculture in Colorado, Nebraska and Kansas.

It's that last border crossing where this water war is under way. Kansas has gone to the Supreme Court to argue that Nebraska uses too much water from the Republican River, and that there's not enough left for Kansas farmers.

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Law
1:23 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Detector Dogs And The Law: The Right To Sniff And Seize

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 3:31 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. In the coming months, the Supreme Court is expected to rule on two cases involving police dogs and the limits of reasonable search. Does the trained nose of a detector dog provide probable cause, and does a sniff from a front porch constitute an illegal search?

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NPR Story
1:23 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

The TV Bad Guys We Hate To Love

Originally published on Thu February 7, 2013 2:37 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Elizabeth and Phillip Jennings, two kids, split level in the Virginia suburbs. They're on a travel agency and drive a big boxy Oldsmobile - a typical American family in Ronald Reagan's America, except for their other job as Soviet spies.

Last Wednesday night, when "The Americans" debuted on FX, an FBI agent moved in next door, which prompted Phillip, played Matthew Rhys, to suggests to Kerri Russell's Elizabeth it might be a good time to defect.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "THE AMERICANS")

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Your Money
11:59 am
Wed February 6, 2013

Skip The Flowers And Jewelry For Your Valentine

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 1:07 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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NPR Story
11:59 am
Wed February 6, 2013

Bravery By Speaking Up Or Keeping Quiet?

fifteen-year-old Malala Yousefzai relaxes. The Pakistani girl shot by the Taliban on Oct. 9 2012 has made her first video statement since she was nearly killed, released Monday, saying she is recovering.
Courtesy of Malala Yousefzai AP

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 5:31 pm

Finally today I want to talk about - and I want you to hear - the voices of two women: one who is really at the beginning of her life, one whose life has just come to its end. One I had the privilege to meet. One I have not — at least not yet. But they are both women who stand for something.

And here is the first:

"Today you can see that I'm alive."

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Politics
11:59 am
Wed February 6, 2013

Shutting Down Black Markets For Guns

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 1:07 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, rising gas prices, rising insurance costs, and rising payroll taxes - Happy New Year, middle class. We'll talk with NPR's senior business editor Marilyn Geewax in just a few minutes about all the things that are squeezing the middle class right now - as if you hadn't noticed.

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