National

The Salt
11:40 am
Mon April 15, 2013

First, You Growl: When Your Dog's Food Is Recalled For Salmonella

Salmonella and other pathogens can be in pet food, not just people food.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 1:43 pm

Ashley Chaifetz is getting a Ph.D. in food safety policy, so you'd figure she knows a thing or two about keeping bad microbes out of her house.

So she was more than a little surprised when she got an email from her online pet food purveyor, saying that they'd sold her dry dog food that might be contaminated with salmonella.

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It's All Politics
11:34 am
Mon April 15, 2013

While Congress Slumbers, Laws Pass Elsewhere

A sliver of moon rises behind the Capitol dome in Washington, D.C. While Congress has shown signs of life this spring, its veritable hibernation has left plenty of room for states to experiment with policy.
Bill O'Leary The Washington Post via Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 2:10 pm

Maybe Barack Obama would be happier as a governor.

It's early days in his second term, but the president's agenda doesn't appear to have a whole lot of momentum. His budget last week was greeted with more criticism than applause from Democrats and Republicans alike.

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Monkey See
11:15 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Superheroines, Fighters, And Why Isn't There A Wonder Woman Movie?

Katie, who's nine years old, explains her love of Wonder Woman in a new documentary.
Vaquera Productions

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 2:41 pm

Any comics fan of any seriousness can rattle off female superheroes who have either had their own books or appeared in other or ensemble books.

But what about ordinary absorbers of culture?

The same people who don't actually read comics but can tell you that Superman is the idealized, square-jawed fighter for good, while Batman is the darker, more conflicted survivor of tragedy and Spider-Man is the scrapper barely concealing an ordinary kid — how many women can they name who have worn capes, particularly ones that aren't superhero derivatives like Supergirl or Batgirl?

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The Two-Way
9:43 am
Mon April 15, 2013

George W. Bush: 'I'm Comfortable With What I Did'

Former President George W. Bush, as he delivered a tribute at the funeral for pianist Van Cliburn last month in Fort Worth, Texas.
Joyce Marshall MCT /Landov

Since President George W. Bush left office in 2009, The Dallas Morning News writes, he has been "a punching bag for [President] Obama, Democrats and even some Republicans."

But while Bush told the Morning News during an interview for a long story posted over the weekend that "nobody likes to be criticized all the time," he also indicated that the criticism hasn't caused him to question his decisions:

"I'm comfortable with what I did," he said. "I'm comfortable with who I am."

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Monkey See
8:47 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Let's Rush To Judgment: 'Catching Fire'

Screenshot

After the huge success of The Hunger Games, both movie and book, it seems like a foregone conclusion that there's enormous pent-up demand for the next chapter of the film adaptation, Catching Fire. This is the book where Katniss' story becomes much more explicitly political, and her status as a revolutionary and a warrior is more fully realized.

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The Two-Way
8:31 am
Mon April 15, 2013

'Mila' Is First Grandchild For George W. And Laura Bush

Former President George W. Bush, former first lady Laura Bush with their daughter Jenna Bush Hager (holding baby Margaret Laura "Mila" Hager) and her husband Henry Hager
Today Show

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 2:48 pm

Jenna Bush Hager, daughter of former President George W. Bush and former first lady Laura Bush, gave birth over the weekend to a girl.

Margaret Laura "Mila" Hager is named for her grandmothers, the former president announced in a statement. According to The Associated Press, the little girl's nickname is pronounced MEE-luh.

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Around the Nation
7:34 am
Mon April 15, 2013

6 Year Old Takes Car Out To Get Chinese

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 1:28 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. People in Lapeer, Michigan called to report a car moving erratically. Callers said it looked like a six-year-old was driving. Police discovered a six-year-old was driving. He'd taken the keys off the counter at home and taught himself what to do. Asked what he thought he was doing, the boy explained that he was going out for Chinese food, of course.

Around the Nation
7:30 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Happy Birthday: Federal Income Tax Turns 100

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 1:28 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

If you weren't finished with your taxes, you may have been buried in paperwork over the weekend. Not true for last-minute filers a century ago. While this year's 1040 tax form has 214 pages of instructions, in 1913 it was just one page. There was a section for how farmers should claim livestock including animal wool and hides. There was a line for losses sustained in firestorm or shipwreck. But sorry, the family account at the country store was not deductible.

Religion
4:42 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Evangelicals Try To Soften Hearts On Overhauling Immigration

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 1:28 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Evangelical Christians in the United States are raising their voices in support of immigration overhaul. Church leaders were largely mute during the earlier contentious debates over how to fix the nation's immigration laws, but now they are speaking out, telling conservative Christians and their friends in Congress that it's OK to embrace compassionate solutions. Here's NPR's John Burnett.

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Politics
4:42 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Sen. Marco Rubio Touts Upcoming Immigration Bill

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 1:28 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Here's a bit of Washington language: getting on all five of the Sunday morning TV political talk shows is known as the full Ginsburg, named for William H. Ginsburg, Monica Lewinsky's lawyer, who was the first to achieve this feat back in 1998.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Sports
4:42 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Australian Adam Scott Wins Golf's Masters

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 1:28 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Australia is celebrating its first Masters champion. Hard to believe, but the great Australian golfer Greg Norman never did this. Adam Scott did, yesterday. He's 32 and outlasted both the field and the weather to win a playoff against the 2009 Masters winner Angel Cabrera.

NPR's Tom Goldman reports.

TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: You know those classic, gorgeous scenes, late on a final round Sunday at Augusta? Sun low in the sky, shadows reaching across the 18th green? Yesterday was just like, except for the shadows and sun.

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Race
4:42 am
Mon April 15, 2013

New NPR Team Covers Race, Ethnicity And Culture

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 1:28 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This week we're introducing a new team at NPR that will cover race, ethnicity and culture. We're here with Gene Demby, who's the team's lead blogger. Gene, thanks for coming in.

GENE DEMBY, BYLINE: Hey, David. Good to talk to you again.

GREENE: It's good to talk to you too. OK. So tell me about your blog, the name of it.

DEMBY: OK. Our blog and our team is called Code Switch.

GREENE: Code Switch. OK. You've got to explain this to us.

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Shots - Health News
3:05 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Inside The Brains Of People Over 80 With Exceptional Memory

Lou Ann Schachner, 84, and Jay Schachner, 81, are volunteers with the Northwestern University SuperAging Project. They keep track of all their plans in a shared calendar. She loves to cook and study French and he is a part-time tax lawyer.
Samantha Murphy for NPR

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 8:45 am

Most research on memory loss in the elderly focuses on dementia, Alzheimer's disease or other brain diseases.

But neuroscientist Emily Rogalski from Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine knew there is great variation in how good memory is in older people. Most have memory loss to varying degrees, but some have strong memories, even well into old age.

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Shots - Health News
3:04 am
Mon April 15, 2013

How Exercise And Other Activities Beat Back Dementia

An older man performs exercises in Mumbai, India. Research suggests that moderate physical exercise may be the best way to keep our brains healthy as we age.
Rajesh Kumar Singh AP

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 8:45 am

The numbers are pretty grim: More than half of all 85-year-olds suffer some form of dementia.

But here's the good news: Brain researchers say there are ways to boost brain power and stave off problems in memory and thinking.

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Shots - Health News
3:01 am
Mon April 15, 2013

Supreme Court Asks: Can Human Genes Be Patented?

Artist's representation of DNA.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 8:45 am

Same-sex marriage got huge headlines at the Supreme Court last month, but in the world of science and medicine, the case being argued on Monday is far more important. The lawsuit deals with a truly 21st century issue — whether human genes may be patented.

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