National

Pop Culture
6:47 am
Sun April 14, 2013

In A Fragmented Cultureverse, Can Pop References Still Pop?

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 11:04 am

In film and TV, pop culture references are meant to give a knowing nod to those in the audience who understand the joke. But in an increasingly segmented and diverse country, those jokes may be pulling in fewer laughs. This story originally aired on Morning Edition on Jan. 18, 2013.

Around the Nation
5:09 am
Sun April 14, 2013

In Hazleton, A Mixed Welcome For City's Immigrants

Roads End bar on Broad Street in Hazleton, Pa., displays a sign in 2007 that reads "ALL Legals Served." Longtime residents of the city are divided over the recent influx of Spanish-speaking immigrants.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 6:33 pm

Many residents say Hazleton, Pa., continues life now as a divided city. While some Spanish-speakers build new lives, longtime residents remain split on how the influx has changed their home.

It's not hard to find a Latino business in Hazleton these days, including law firms, insurance agencies and even a migrant education program. Amilcar Arroyo, the publisher of a local Spanish-language newspaper, says Latinos are now firmly establishing themselves as a part of the city.

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Education
4:58 am
Sun April 14, 2013

Jazz In The Cafeteria: Kids Learn To Listen While They Chomp

Saxophonist Harold Rapp plays during lunchtime at Alice Terry Elementary School in Sheridan, Colo.
Jenny Brundin for NPR

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 6:44 pm

School lunch is often synonymous with loud noise. Studies have shown the decibel level in some cafeterias is as high as a lawn mower.

Every so often, though, students at Alice Terry Elementary School, southwest of Denver, are asked not to make any noise.

When the music teacher told students here they'd occasionally have a "silent" lunch break, this was kindergartner Alyssa Norquette's reaction: "Why do we need a silent lunch? Is it because we're too loud or something?"

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Shots - Health News
4:57 am
Sun April 14, 2013

Scientists Race To Stay Ahead Of New Bird Flu Virus

Workers prepare an H7N9 virus detection kit at the Center for Disease Control in Beijing on April 3.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 9:01 am

A precious package arrived at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last Thursday afternoon.

Inside, packed in dry ice to keep it frozen, was a vial containing millions of viruses derived from a 35-year-old Chinese housewife who died last Tuesday of respiratory and kidney failure.

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The Two-Way
1:02 pm
Sat April 13, 2013

Storms Continue To Pound Large Parts Of The Country

An Xcel Energy crew works to restore a storm-damaged power line on Friday in Sioux Falls, S.D. More than 18,000 homes in the region were without power after a major spring storm brought freezing rain and heavy snow that downed trees and power lines.
DIRK LAMMERS AP

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 4:40 pm

Spring is spreading its share of nasty weather throughout much of the Midwest and Deep South, leaving thousands of people without power.

The upper Midwest is just emerging from a storm that dumped several inches of snow in parts of the Dakotas and forced temperatures down to as low as 22 degrees. Now, forecasters are saying another 6 to 12 inches of snow could fall as a new storm rages through Montana, North Dakota and northern Minnesota.

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The Two-Way
11:26 am
Sat April 13, 2013

Woods Given Two-Stroke Penalty At Masters, Avoiding Disqualification

Tiger Woods drops his ball after hitting into the water on the 15th hole during the second round of the Masters Tournament at Augusta National Golf Club. He was later assessed a two-stroke penalty for the improper drop.
Mike Ehrmann Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 14, 2013 7:19 am

Tiger Woods has been given a two-stroke penalty at the Masters, a tournament he's won four times, after a review found that he performed an illegal drop on the 15th hole of his second round Friday. Woods faced a possible disqualification for the infraction.

The incident began when Woods' wedge shot was a bit too on-target — it hit the base of the pin, and shot off the green and into a water hazard.

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The Two-Way
9:44 am
Sat April 13, 2013

Mother Of Slain Sandy Hook Student Sits In For Obama's Weekly Address

Francine Wheeler, seen here delivering the presidential address alongside her husband, David, urged the Senate to pass gun control legislation.
YouTube

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 3:16 pm

In a rare departure from tradition, Saturday's weekly presidential address was delivered not by President Obama but instead by Francine Wheeler, whose son Ben, 6, died in the Sandy Hook Elementary School shootings last December.

Flanked by her husband, David, Wheeler called for Americans to urge the Senate to pass gun control legislation that it is scheduled to begin debating in the coming week.

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Around the Nation
6:17 am
Sat April 13, 2013

Saying Goodbye To The Grand Canyon's Mail Mules

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 8:57 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The U.S. Postal Service announced this week that it would postpone the end of Saturday mail delivery, which it had proposed to stop earlier in the year, but mail service will halt at the bottom of the Grand Canyon where mules have delivered the mail since the 1920s. The company that runs the mule train says they will no longer deliver packages starting next week. The service was a way for loved ones to send care packages to guides rafting down the Colorado River. Laurel Morales of member station KJZZ reports from Flagstaff.

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Environment
5:33 am
Sat April 13, 2013

Now Endangered, Florida's Silver Springs Once Lured Tourists

A glass-bottomed boat glides along water in Silver Springs, Fla. The springs, once a major tourist destination, have declined both in volume and in water quality.
Greg Allen NPR

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 5:24 pm

Before Disney World, Silver Springs in Central Florida was for decades one of the state's most popular tourist destinations.

Even if you've never visited Silver Springs, you might have seen it. The 1960s television show Sea Hunt was filmed here, as were countless movies, including Tarzan and Creature From the Black Lagoon.

The crystal clear water of Silver Springs made it invaluable to Hollywood. Guy Marwick, the founder of the Silver River Museum, says it drew more than 1 million visitors a year.

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Remembrances
5:07 am
Sat April 13, 2013

How Did All Those People Get Inside Jonathan Winters?

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 10:11 am

You can call anyone but Einstein a genius and start an argument.

Well, maybe Einstein or Jonathan Winters. The comedian, who died Friday at the age of 87, was immediately hailed by Steve Martin, Robin Williams and others as a genius.

He made hit comedy albums, was a regular on the old Tonight Show, memorably knocked down a gas station in It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad, World and co-starred with and inspired Robin Williams.

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It's All Politics
6:11 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

Tiny Group Linked To McConnell Recording Causes Big Stir

Sen. Mitch McConnell and his wife, former Labor Secretary Elaine Chao, at a Republican dinner in Winchester, Ky., last month.
Roger Alford AP

Originally published on Sat April 13, 2013 7:19 am

So who exactly comprises Progress Kentucky, the superPAC linked to the surreptitious recording of a meeting at Sen. Mitch McConnell's campaign headquarters? In the recording, an aide is heard disparaging actress Ashley Judd, who was then considering a Senate run to challenge the Senate's top Republican.

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Law
4:26 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

New York Lawmakers To Confront Recent Spate Of Corruption

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 5:20 pm

In the wake of two high profile corruption arrests this month, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is proposing laws that are supposed to make it easier to catch corrupt politicians. Good government groups say it might also help to take some of the money out of politics in New York — and other states too.

Code Switch
3:15 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

Six Moments Of Code-Switching In Popular Culture

Gloria from "Modern Family" does a whole lot of code-switching on the show, especially when her family comes to town to visit baby Fulgencio.
Modern Family

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Shots - Health News
3:08 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

Wait For Obamacare Price Tags Could Last Months

If buying health insurance were only this easy.
iStockphoto.com

Vermont became the first state to provide a glimpse, although an imperfect one, of how much individual health insurance might cost under the Affordable Care Act.

Rates made public there last week, while of limited relevance to the rest of the country because of the state's unusual insurance market, showed little change from current prices. The prices reassured health law supporters fearing headlines about sticker shock.

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The Salt
2:45 pm
Fri April 12, 2013

Bands Aren't The Only Things That Incubate At Music Festivals

Customers line up for an ice cream van at the 2011 Glastonbury Music Festival in southwest England.
Matt Cardy Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 8:04 pm

Coachella, the massive outdoor music festival that kicks off this weekend in Indio, Calif., has become an "incubator" not just for new bands, but for rising food entrepreneurs, according to a story in the San Jose Mercury News earlier this week.

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