National

Shots - Health News
11:56 am
Tue January 15, 2013

Pictures May Speak Louder Than Words When It Comes To Smoking

A cigarette warning label image approved by the Food and Drug Administration.
Food and Drug Administration

Researchers have found that graphic anti-smoking images may be more powerful than words alone in warning people from different income and racial groups about the dangers of smoking.

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Shots - Health News
10:44 am
Tue January 15, 2013

These Are The Tweets That Will Get A Doctor In Trouble

What's up, doc? How would you feel if your doctor shared a picture like this one?
Dr. Ryan Greysen

Originally published on Thu January 17, 2013 8:50 am

Is it OK for your doctor to tweet a drunken photo?

What if the photo shows the doctor drinking, say, at a staff holiday party, but not noticeably under the influence?

Or what if the festive physician is wearing scrubs in the photo, which might imply he was drinking on the job?

The answers to those questions, according to the people responsible for disciplining doctors: definitely not, probably and maybe.

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U.S.
10:34 am
Tue January 15, 2013

The Politics Of Disaster Aid Are Starting To Shift

A U.S. flag still hung on the remains of homes in the Breezy Point neighborhood of Queens, N.Y., in December, nearly two months after Superstorm Sandy tore through the area.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 15, 2013 12:11 pm

House Republicans are taking a Solomonic approach to relief for areas ravaged by Superstorm Sandy.

Having already split financial aid for the Northeast into two votes, House leaders are now splitting the second package itself into two, giving conservatives the opportunity to oppose spending provisions they don't like.

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Around the Nation
7:46 am
Tue January 15, 2013

Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas Speaks

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep with a word from Clarence Thomas - we're just not exactly sure what it is. The Supreme Court justice had gone seven years without saying a word in oral arguments. Then yesterday, Justice Thomas spoke.

Several justices were talking at once, leaving his exact remark unclear. But a detailed contextual analysis by The New York Times suggests he told a joke, saying a law degree from Yale or Harvard might be proof of incompetence. He's a Yale grad.

Politics
4:22 am
Tue January 15, 2013

Obama Urges Congress To Raise Debt Ceiling

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

In a looming battle over the federal debt ceiling, Republicans in Congress insist they hold the cards. They do have the power to stop federal borrowing, withhold payment of federal debts and cause unknown damage to the world economy. Some want to use that power to force President Obama to reduce federal spending in the way they want.

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Business
4:22 am
Tue January 15, 2013

Toyota Regains No. 1 Sales Position

Originally published on Tue January 15, 2013 6:43 am

After careening from back-to-back crises — recalls and the tsunami — Toyota is No. 1 in worldwide sales again. Toyota says it sold at least 9.7 million vehicles in 2012. General Motors reports it sold 9.3 million. Both companies say it doesn't really matter which one is in the top spot.

Business
4:22 am
Tue January 15, 2013

JPMorgan Chase Agrees To Beef Up Risk Management

Originally published on Tue January 15, 2013 6:06 am

Banking regulators are telling JPMorgan Chase that it must take action to improve its risk analysis and money-laundering controls. The bank racked up a $6 billion trading loss last year. CEO Jamie Dimon cited managerial lapses and called the loss inexcusable.

Around the Nation
4:22 am
Tue January 15, 2013

Utilities Contemplate What Climate Change Means To Them

Originally published on Tue January 15, 2013 9:36 am

Superstorm Sandy devastated the mostly below ground electric system that runs through the heart of Manhattan. What happens if Sandy is part of a new weather pattern? Con Edison, the utility that provides power to much of New York's five boroughs, is looking for ways to protect its aging infrastructure.

Law
4:22 am
Tue January 15, 2013

Court To Weigh In On Concealed Weapons In Md.

Originally published on Tue January 15, 2013 7:18 am

A federal appeals court is considering a challenge to Maryland's handgun permit laws in the case of a man who sued after being denied a concealed carrry permit. At issue is whether Maryland can require people to prove a "good and substantial reason" to exercise a constitutional right.

Shots - Health News
3:23 am
Tue January 15, 2013

Flu Wave Stresses Out Hospitals

Physician assistants Scott Fillman (left) and Andrew Hunadi get ready to see patients with flu symptoms, in a tent erected just outside the emergency entrance at the Lehigh Valley Hospital in Allentown, Pa.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Wed January 16, 2013 3:32 pm

What does it feel like to be working in an emergency room during this nasty flu season? Monday. Every day feels like Monday, typically the busiest time of week in the ER.

"Now instead of having a Monday peak, it's seven days a week of a Monday," said Dr. Bill Frohna, who runs the emergency department at MedStar Washington Hospital Center in Washington, D.C.

It's still too soon to say whether this is a historically bad flu season. But it's already clear that emergency rooms around the country are filled with a feverish throng that is much larger than the last time around.

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World
3:22 am
Tue January 15, 2013

Training Program Aims To Prep Soldiers For Civilian Jobs

Minnesota National Guard Capt. Jeff Pratt, who has nearly 20 years of military service under his belt, found a civilian job with the help of a new jobs program led by the Minnesota National Guard.
Jennifer Simonson for NPR

Originally published on Tue January 15, 2013 10:11 am

Thousands of Minnesota soldiers deployed in Kuwait woke up to a surprise last spring. Just weeks before the end of their tour, a group of corporate recruiters in business-casual attire showed up on base. The first-of-its kind visit was part of a new strategy to help returning service members find civilian jobs before their feet even hit U.S. soil.

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Losing Our Religion
3:21 am
Tue January 15, 2013

More Young People Are Moving Away From Religion, But Why?

(From left) Yusuf Ahmad, Kyle Simpson, and Melissa Adelman also participated in the discussion about religion with NPR's David Greene at the Sixth & I Historic Synagogue in Washington, D.C.
Coburn Dukehart NPR

Originally published on Wed January 16, 2013 6:24 pm

One-fifth of Americans are religiously unaffiliated — higher than at any time in recent U.S. history — and those younger than 30 especially seem to be drifting from organized religion. A third of young Americans say they don't belong to any religion.

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The Two-Way
6:38 pm
Mon January 14, 2013

U.S. Military's Suicide Rate Surpassed Combat Deaths In 2012

U.S. military suicides rose in 2012. Here, the Army's "Generating Health and Discipline in the Force" report, right, is seen last January. The reports was a follow-up to its "Health Promotion/Risk Reduction/Suicide Prevention" report.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 15, 2013 6:47 am

The number of suicide deaths in the U.S. military surged to a record 349 last year — more than the 295 Americans who died fighting in Afghanistan in 2012. The numbers were first reported by the AP; NPR has confirmed them.

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'Radio Diaries'
5:43 pm
Mon January 14, 2013

'Segregation Forever': A Fiery Pledge Forgiven, But Not Forgotten

During his inaugural address on Jan. 14, 1963, newly elected Alabama Gov. George C. Wallace vowed "segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever."
Bettmann Corbis

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 8:17 pm

It was just a single line in a speech given 50 years ago today. But that one phrase, "segregation now, segregation tomorrow and segregation forever," is remembered as one of the most vehement rallying cries against racial equality in American history.

The year was 1963. Civil rights activists were fighting for equal access to schools and the voting booth, and the federal government was preparing to intervene in many Southern states.

And on Jan. 14, in Montgomery, Ala., newly elected Gov. George Wallace, a Democrat, stepped up to a podium to deliver his inaugural address.

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Energy
5:40 pm
Mon January 14, 2013

Five Years Into Fracking Boom, One Pa. Town At A Turning Point

The natural gas fracking boom has sped up life in Towanda, Pa. There are positives and negatives to that fact — Towanda's unemployment rate stayed low throughout the recession, but its crime rate jumped, too. And now that natural gas prices have slowed down drilling, Towanda is wondering whether its boom is already turning into a bust.

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