National

Law
4:30 pm
Tue April 2, 2013

Conn. Lawmakers Propose Strict Gun Laws After Newtown Shooting

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 9:56 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

In Connecticut, a bipartisan group of lawmakers has agreed on what it calls the toughest gun laws in the nation. But they're still not tough enough, say some state gun control advocates. They're concern: No outright ban on high-capacity magazines, like the ones Adam Lanza used at Sandy Hook Elementary.

Jeff Cohen from member station WNPR has our story.

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Law
4:30 pm
Tue April 2, 2013

State Senator Accused Of Trying To Buy A Spot In New York City Mayoral Race

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 9:56 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

In the race to replace outgoing New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, things took a strange turn today. Federal officials arrested six people, including elected officials and party leaders. They say they have uncovered a wide-ranging conspiracy centered on buying a spot for State Senator Malcolm Smith, a Democrat, to be the Republican candidate for mayor. Member station WNYC's Brigid Bergin has our story.

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It's All Politics
4:20 pm
Tue April 2, 2013

Daughter Of Former Fla. Sen. Bob Graham Running For Congress

Gwen Graham, a lawyer and administrator in the Leon County, Fla., school district, says she'll seek the Democratic nomination to challenge Republican Rep. Steve Southerland next year.
Gwen Graham For U.S. Congress

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 4:37 pm

The daughter of Florida political legend Bob Graham has announced she will run for Congress next year, taking on incumbent Republican Steve Southerland.

Gwen Graham, a lawyer and administrator in the Leon County school district, made the announcement Tuesday morning. "It doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that Congress is a dysfunctional mess," Graham wrote on her campaign website.

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Shots - Health News
3:55 pm
Tue April 2, 2013

Could Wind Turbines Be Toxic To The Ear?

A maintenance worker looks out over an off-shore wind farm in Liverpool, England in 2008. Some people are concerned about the potential health effects of noise from wind turbines.
Christopher Furlong Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 3, 2013 11:18 am

The U.S. is embracing wind energy, with wind turbines making up half of the new electricity added to the power grid last year. But a smattering of people who live near the turbines say they're a nuisance — and making them ill.

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It's All Politics
3:43 pm
Tue April 2, 2013

Seeking Forgiveness And A House Seat, Sanford Again Faces GOP Voters

Former South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford faces former Charleston County Councilman Curtis Bostic in the GOP primary runoff Tuesday. The winner will represent Republicans in a May 7 special election for a U.S. House seat.
Bruce Smith AP

Originally published on Wed April 3, 2013 10:23 am

Update at 8:41 p.m. ET Sanford Wins Runoff

Former Gov. Mark Sanford, whose political career was derailed four years ago by his admission of an extramarital affair, has won the GOP nomination for the U.S. House seat he once held, reports The Associated Press. Note at 8:10 a.m. Wednesday: Sanford won with about 57 percent of the vote. (We mistakenly said earlier that he won "by" about 57 percent.)

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Around the Nation
3:43 pm
Tue April 2, 2013

In Missouri, Days Of Drought Send Caretakers To One 'Big Tree'

This bur oak, called "The Big Tree" by Missouri locals, has been around for centuries. When a drought hit the state last year, the community came together to offer help and water for the iconic tree.
Courtesy of Christopher Starbuck

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 10:52 am

The devastating drought in the Midwest last summer is a story often told by the numbers, with statistics on large crop failures, days without rain and thousands of parched acres.

This story is also about a tree — a bur oak in rural Columbia, Mo., that everyone calls "The Big Tree." Although it's survived all kinds of punishments during its 350 years on the prairie, last year's record drought was especially tough.

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Around the Nation
2:31 pm
Tue April 2, 2013

An Overlooked School Shooting And The Korean-American Community

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 2:57 pm

On Apr. 2, 2012, six people were killed and three wounded at Oikos University in Oakland, Calif. The shooter was a Korean-American former student, One L. Goh. Writer Jay Kang, who visited Goh in prison, explains how this tragedy has been discussed in the Korean-American community.

The Salt
2:29 pm
Tue April 2, 2013

Fruit, Not Fries: Lunchroom Makeovers Nudge Kids Toward Better Choices

Students select blueberries and rolls from the food line at Lincoln Elementary in Olympia, Wash., in 2004.
John Froschauer AP

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 4:49 pm

Gone are the days of serving up tater tots and French toast sticks to students. Here are the days of carrot sticks and quinoa.

New nutritional guidelines, announced in 2012, require public school lunchrooms to offer more whole grains, low-fat milk and fewer starchy sides like french fries. But short of stationing grandmothers in every cafeteria, how do you ensure that students actually eat the fruits and veggies they're being offered?

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Mental Health
2:22 pm
Tue April 2, 2013

A Focus On Adults: Living With Chronic ADHD

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 2:57 pm

With rates of childhood attention deficit hyperactivity disorder at alarming highs, a study confirms that, for many, the condition persists into adulthood. A study by the Boston Children's Hospital and the Mayo Clinic finds that the chronic form of ADHD can lead to depression and substance abuse.

Around the Nation
2:11 pm
Tue April 2, 2013

What Changes As Women Rise Through Law Enforcement's Ranks

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 2:57 pm

President Barack Obama named Julia Pierson as the head of the Secret Service, the first female director in the agency's history. At least one woman is said to be on the shortlist for FBI director. Women are also climbing the ranks on local police forces as well.

Shots - Health News
12:20 pm
Tue April 2, 2013

The Hidden Limitations Of Health Savings Accounts

In order to get the tax advantages of a health savings account, the health plan it's linked to has to meet certain criteria.
iStockphoto.com

Health plan deductibles keep getting higher — the proportion of workers with a deductible that topped $1,000 for single coverage nearly tripled in the past five years, to 34 percent.

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Education
11:29 am
Tue April 2, 2013

For Women, No Straight Road To Success

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 12:57 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, it is April, which means, along with April showers, National Poetry Month and we will be asking you once again to contribute if you would like by tweeting us your original poems in 140 characters or less. We are going to kick it off with our curator Holly Bass in just a minute.

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Around the Nation
11:29 am
Tue April 2, 2013

Should Toddlers Own Tablets?

Originally published on Tue April 2, 2013 12:57 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. They say it takes a village to raise a child, but maybe you just need a few moms in your corner. Every week, we check in with a diverse group of parents for their common sense and savvy advice.

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Around the Nation
7:05 am
Tue April 2, 2013

Surprise Party Kidnapping Lands Friends In Hot Water

Friends of a New York man planned a surprise party, but he found out. To surprise him, they threw a pillowcase over his head, threw him in a van and drove him to the party in Pennsylvania. Witnesses to the fake abduction called police, who mounted a massive search.

Around the Nation
6:58 am
Tue April 2, 2013

Mets Opening Day Special For Fan, Usher

In 1964, Robert Ostertag attended his first of 50 straight New York Mets home openers. That same day, Luke Gasparre began his job as an usher. The New York Times captured quite a moment Monday: Gasparre showed Ostertag to his seat in section 310.

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