National

The Salt
7:25 am
Sun April 12, 2015

Beyond Almonds: A Rogue's Gallery of Guzzlers In California's Drought

Leif Parsons for NPR

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 5:54 am

California is parched. Wells are running dry. Vegetable fields have been left fallow and lawns are dying. There must be some villain behind all this, right?

Of course there is. In fact, have your pick. As a public service, The Salt is bringing you several of the leading candidates. They have been nominated by widely respected national publications and interest groups.

There's just one problem: Not all of these shady characters live up to their nefarious job description. Let us explain.

1. Almonds

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Television
5:37 am
Sun April 12, 2015

'Nurse Jackie' Ends As TV's Most Honest Depiction Of Addiction

Edie Falco stars in Showtime's "Nurse Jackie."
David M. Russell Showtime

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 4:46 pm

Even after an accident with a carload full of pills gets her arrested, Nurse Jackie Peyton can't be honest about her addictions. Especially not while explaining her sudden absence to her ex-husband Kevin.

"Where were you this past week?" Kevin asks, tensely.

"Really, you want to know where I was?" Jackie responds. "I went to a detox program."

"Is that what you call jail?" he shoots back. "I was notified of the accident. The car's still in my name."

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U.S.
5:25 am
Sun April 12, 2015

Newly Released Texas Inmates Prepare For A Long Ride To Freedom

The Huntsville Greyhound station has been the gateway to the free world for hundreds of thousands of offenders who are released from The Walls, the Civil War-era red-brick prison, Monday through Friday.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 9:37 am

Last year, 21,000 inmates were released in Huntsville, Texas — one of the largest prison towns in America. For most of them, their gateway to the free world is the Huntsville Greyhound station.

Monday through Friday, the glass doors swing open on the front of the Civil War-era, red-brick prison they call "The Walls." The inmates exit and shuffle along the sidewalk, some smiling, some pensive, shouldering potato sacks full of belongings. Most of them don't have loved ones waiting, so they continue walking the two blocks to the bus station — single file, out of habit.

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Around the Nation
6:09 pm
Sat April 11, 2015

As Scott Family Reels From Police Shooting, Hundreds Turn Out For Funeral

Originally published on Sat April 11, 2015 9:04 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

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The Two-Way
6:09 pm
Sat April 11, 2015

Federal Government Protects Bat, Angers Industry

An undated file photo provided by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources of a northern long-eared bat. A fungal disease has devastated the species, now listed as threatened.
AP

Originally published on Sat April 11, 2015 9:04 pm

They may not be the most attractive creatures in the world, and they scare the life out of many people, but you have to feel bad for the bat.

Millions of them are dying across the Northeast, the Midwest and parts of the South, from a disease called White Nose Syndrome, named for a white fungus that crusts their faces.

Seven species of bats are being decimated by White Nose Syndrome; the hardest-hit species is the northern long-eared bat. Last week, the federal government listed it as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.

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The Two-Way
5:12 pm
Sat April 11, 2015

U.S. Capitol Briefly Placed On Lockdown After Apparent Suicide

Members of law enforcement and emergency services gather and a perimeter created around the west front of the U.S. Capitol as the U.S. Capitol was on lockdown Saturday after an apparent suicide.
Carolyn Kaster AP

A "precautionary lockdown" of the U.S. Capitol and Capitol Visitor Center has been lifted today after a shot was fired in an apparent suicide, according to police.

"The suspected shooter has been neutralized but the U.S. Capitol Building has been locked down as a precautionary measure," Capitol Police spokeswoman Kimberly Schneider said in a written statement after the shooting, which occurred around 1 p.m. EDT.

No one else is believed to have been hurt, The Associated Press says.

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The Salt
4:21 pm
Sat April 11, 2015

Eating To Break 100: Longevity Diet Tips From The Blue Zones

A distinct version of the Mediterranean diet is followed on the Blue Zone island of Ikaria, Greece. It emphasizes olive oil, vegetables, beans, fruit, moderate amounts of alcohol and low quantities of meat and dairy products.
Gianluca Colla Courtesy of Blue Zones

Originally published on Wed April 15, 2015 2:02 pm

Want to live to be 100? It's tempting to think that with enough omega-3s, kale and blueberries, you could eat your way there.

But one of the key takeaways from a new book on how to eat and live like "the world's healthiest people" is that longevity is not just about food.

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The Two-Way
2:27 pm
Sat April 11, 2015

Part Of Fishing Boat Destroyed In Japan Tsunami Appears Off Oregon

An image provide by Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. shows a chunk of a fiberglass boat 25-30' long that was spotted off the Oregon shore west of Ona Beach on Thursday. The debris is the latest to reach the U.S. West Coast from Japan's devastating 2011 tsunami.
AP

Originally published on Sat April 11, 2015 3:26 pm

A piece of a commercial fishing boat that was ripped from Japan's coast by the March 11, 2011 tsunami has turned up on near Oregon four years later, carrying a small diaspora of live yellowtail jack fish, native to east Asian waters, according to state park officials.

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Education
8:55 am
Sat April 11, 2015

Students Push College Fossil Fuel Divestment To Stigmatize Industry

Alumnus Will Lawrence of the Fossil Fuel Divestment Student Network came back to Swarthmore to help the students effectively communicate their protest to the school's administrators.
Emily Cohen NewsWorks

Originally published on Sat April 11, 2015 10:54 am

In the past few years, students at hundreds of colleges and universities have started pushing their schools to divest from fossil fuel companies as a way to slow climate change.

The campaign has had some notable wins in the past year. But at tiny Swarthmore College, outside of Philadelphia, where the movement was born, students have been staging a sit-in for nearly a month to try to make their voices heard.

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Law
8:06 am
Sat April 11, 2015

Colorado Deals Inmates A New Deck Of Cards

Colorado is the latest state to produce the cold case cards.
Colorado Bureau of Investigation

Originally published on Sat April 11, 2015 10:54 am

There's not a whole lot to do in prison, so inmates spend a fair amount of time playing cards.

For several years, law enforcement officials around the country have been putting that prisoners' pastime to good use. They've been putting facts and photos from unsolved crimes in front of prisoners' eyes by printing them on decks of cards, hoping to generate leads.

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Race
7:43 am
Sat April 11, 2015

Large Crowds Expected For Walter Scott's S.C. Funeral

Originally published on Sat April 11, 2015 10:54 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TAMARA KEITH, HOST:

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Arts & Life
7:43 am
Sat April 11, 2015

Inside The Wild (And Hand-Drawn) World Of Bill Plympton

Jake and Ella meet cute on the bumper cars in Cheatin', but their perfect romance goes wrong after another woman starts scheming to drive them apart.
Plymptoons

Originally published on Sat April 11, 2015 10:54 am

Bill Plympton has come to be known as the king of indie animation — he's made seven animated features, all carefully hand-drawn. The latest has just been released — it's called Cheatin', and it's a wild tale of love, betrayal and bumper cars. Like many of Plympton's films, it has no dialogue.

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Sports
7:43 am
Sat April 11, 2015

Compression Clothes' Advantage Could Be Placebo Effect

Originally published on Sat April 11, 2015 10:54 am

Copyright 2015 KERA Unlimited. To see more, visit http://www.kera.org/.

Transcript

TAMARA KEITH, HOST:

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Goats and Soda
7:03 am
Sat April 11, 2015

Former Ebola Fighters Feel As If They Get No Respect

Mohammed Zangar (left) and Amos Tomah find relief from the sun under the leaves of a mango tree.
Ingrid Gercama Ingrid Gercama

Originally published on Sat April 11, 2015 9:35 am

They are the heroes nobody remembers.

"We were the foot soldiers," says Amos Tomah, 25. When Ebola struck Liberia, he went door-to-door to raise awareness about the disease; he earned about $80 a day for his two-week stint.

His friend, 42-year-old Rancy "Hooks" Harrison, used his taxi (and later, a Red Cross ambulance) to pick up bodies of Ebola victims from West Point, a poor neighborhood in the capital city of Monrovia. Hooks made $600 a month while working for the Red Cross.

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Author Interviews
6:17 am
Sat April 11, 2015

'Born With Teeth,' Actress Kate Mulgrew On A Life Lived With Abandon

Mulgrew starred as Captain Kathryn Janeway, the first woman to command a Federation Starship, in Star Trek: Voyager.
CBS Photo Archive/Delivered By Online USA Getty Images

Originally published on Sat April 11, 2015 7:22 pm

Even if you don't know Kate Mulgrew's name, you know her work. She currently plays Red, the formidable prison kitchen manager in the series Orange Is the New Black. And for seven seasons she was Captain Janeway on Star Trek: Voyager.

"Nothing could be more challenging, more arduous, or more rewarding than that part on that series," Mulgrew tells NPR's Tamara Keith, referring to the role of Janeway.

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It's All Politics
5:03 am
Sat April 11, 2015

5 Things You Should Know About Hillary Clinton

Hillary Clinton in June 1969 at the Rodham family home. She was featured in a Life magazine story called "The Class of '69."
Lee Balterman The LIFE Premium Collection/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 2:34 pm

Many Americans have a pre-formed opinion of Hillary Clinton, who is expected to announce her candidacy for president this weekend. Call it a blessing — or, simply, an inevitable effect — of being in the public eye for so long. But Clinton has long implied that the public perception of her is all wrong.

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Shots - Health News
5:38 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Clam Cancer Spreads Along Eastern Seaboard

The blood cancer in soft-shell clams poses no risk to humans, but it does kill the shellfish.
Pat Wellenbach AP

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 8:50 am

Not every clam is, as the expression goes, happy as a clam. Even shellfish, it turns out, can get cancer. And it just might be that this cancer is spread from clam to clam by rogue cells bobbing through the ocean, scientists reported Thursday in the journal Cell.

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Law
5:05 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Police-Involved Shootings Highlight Problem With Law Enforcement 'Culture'

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 7:30 pm

NPR's Audie Cornish talks with Seth Stoughton, an assistant professor at the University of South Carolina School of Law, about his view that there needs to be a paradigm shift in policing away from the "warrior mindset" to a "guardian" role.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Around the Nation
5:04 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Fort Hood Purple Heart Ceremony Honors Survivors Of 2009 Shooting

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 7:30 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Law
5:04 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Charleston Civil Rights Leaders Point To Gentrification In Racial Justice Debate

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 7:30 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Salt
3:57 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Lunch, Not Landfill: Nonprofit Rescues Produce Rejected At U.S. Border

Yolanda Soto runs Borderlands Food Bank in Nogales, Ariz. Each year, the nonprofit rescues millions of pounds of nutritious and safe fruits and vegetables rejected near the U.S. border and redirects them to needy families across America.
Lisa Morehouse for NPR

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 11:07 am

Just across the border from Nogales, Ariz., rows of northbound trucks line up for inspection. Over half of the produce that's grown in Mexico and imported — $4 billion worth — comes through this border crossing. Most gets distributed to all parts of the U.S. and Canada, but some fruits and vegetables get rejected before they leave the city of Nogales.

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The Two-Way
2:56 pm
Fri April 10, 2015

Cool Atlantic, Warm Pacific Could Mean Few Hurricanes

Hurricane Arthur, the first hurricane of the 2014 Atlantic season, as it nears landfall in the Carolinas.
LANCE-MODIS NASA

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 4:43 pm

Seven named storms, three hurricanes — one of them major.

That's the early prediction for the 2015 Atlantic basin hurricane season by Colorado State University's Department of Atmospheric Sciences. If the forecast pans out, it would be one of the quietest seasons in decades.

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The Salt
10:59 am
Fri April 10, 2015

Cooking With Emoji: We're Taking Eggplant Back From The Bros

Unicode/Apple

Originally published on Thu April 16, 2015 2:39 pm

Last week, Amanda Hess at Slate laid out the evolution of a situation truly distressing to our food-loving hearts: Over the past couple of years, it seems, the purple, elongated eggplant found on the emoji keyboard on smartphones "has risen to become America's dominant phallic fruit."

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NPR History Dept.
10:54 am
Fri April 10, 2015

Defeating Polio, The Disease That Paralyzed America

A nurse prepares children for a polio vaccine shot as part of citywide testing of the vaccine on elementary school students in Pittsburgh in 1954.
Bettmann/CORBIS

Originally published on Sat April 11, 2015 8:57 am

Tens of thousands of Americans — in the first half of the 20th century — were stricken by poliomyelitis. Polio, as it's known, is a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

The hallmarks of the Polio Era were children on crutches and in iron lungs, shuttered swimming pools, theaters warning moviegoers to not sit too close to one another.

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It's All Politics
10:50 am
Fri April 10, 2015

Hillary Clinton Expected To Go Small With Big Announcement

Don't expect a big rally with thousands of cheering supporters to launch Hillary Clinton's campaign. For her second run at the presidency, she's out to prove she is taking nothing for granted.
Yana Paskova Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 4:16 pm

The long will-she-or-won't-she charade is nearly over. A source with knowledge of Hillary Clinton's campaign plans tells NPR's Mara Liasson she will announce on Sunday that she's running for president.

But don't expect a big rally with thousands of cheering supporters. For her second run at the presidency, the former secretary of state and first lady is going small. Think Starbucks doing small batch coffee roasts.

One of the biggest names in American politics is out to prove she's taking nothing for granted.

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Shots - Health News
10:40 am
Fri April 10, 2015

Bundle Of Joyful Microbes: Mom's DNA Alters Baby's Gut Bacteria

During the first year of life, a baby's gut will become home to about 1,000 species of bacteria.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 8:35 pm

Right after birth, trillions of microbes rush into a baby's gut and start to grow. Most of these critters come from the mom's skin, birth canal and gut.

But exactly which types of bacteria take up residence in an infant's gut can depend on the mother's DNA, scientists reported Thursday.

The study, published in the journal Microbiome, focuses on a microbe called Bifidobacterium that potentially benefits babies.

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Monkey See
10:13 am
Fri April 10, 2015

Pop Culture Happy Hour: 'The Comedians' And Cameo Appearances

NPR

This week, paired with the return of Louie, FX introduced a comedy series called The Comedians, which features Billy Crystal and Josh Gad as ... well, as Bizarro Billy Crystal and Josh Gad, forced to work together on a fictional FX sketch comedy show.

Does that make sense?

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The Two-Way
8:30 am
Fri April 10, 2015

80 Municipal Courts In St. Louis County Change Fees After Criticism

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 3:47 pm

Changing a process that was blamed for fueling anger and frustration with the legal system in Ferguson, Mo., 80 municipal courts in St. Louis County have agreed to set uniform fees and fines to be more fair to people charged with offenses such as speeding.

Critics call the move one step on what they see as a long path of reform. They note that the agreement is voluntary and lacks a formal system of tracking or enforcement.

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Television
8:04 am
Fri April 10, 2015

'Game Of Thrones' And 'Veep' Anchor HBO's Killer Sunday Lineup

As the new season of Game of Thrones begins, Tyrion Lannister (played by Peter Dinklage) is on the run after killing his manipulative father.
HBO

Originally published on Fri April 10, 2015 8:26 pm

(Spoiler alert: Details from the new seasons of several shows follow below.)

HBO's hit fantasy drama Game of Thrones ended last year with the most shocking death of the season: Tywin Lannister's.

Lannister, the most influential power broker in the fictional, medieval-style continent of Westeros, was killed by his son, the tortured alcoholic dwarf Tyrion.

When the show returns with a new episode Sunday night, Tyrion is on the run. The man who is helping him, a scheming spymaster named Varys, wants Tyrion's help.

But Tyrion isn't having it.

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Shots - Health News
6:03 am
Fri April 10, 2015

A Lifesaving Medicine That My Patient Didn't Get In Time

A kit with naloxone, also known by its brand name Narcan, is displayed at the South Jersey AIDS Alliance in Atlantic City. Naloxone counters an overdose with heroin or certain prescription painkillers by blocking the receptors these opioids bind to in the brain.
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 5:56 pm

Every doctor and nurse in our hospital's emergency room knew Jerome. He was one of our regulars.

In his 20s, he had back problems that led him to become addicted to prescription painkillers. That habit proved too expensive, and he switched to heroin.

Jerome used to come to the ER nearly every week. Often, he just wanted a sandwich and someone to talk to. He had lost his job and his home. Several months ago, he decided he had to quit heroin.

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