National

National Security
2:17 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Knives On Planes: Redefining Safety In The Skies

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 3:56 pm

The Transportation Security Administration is set to enact changes to the list of prohibited items in April. Small pocket knives and some sporting goods will be allowed in carry-on items. The proposed changes were met with opposition from flight attendants and passengers who fear the items pose a safety risk.

The Two-Way
12:20 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Harvard Offers 'Partial Apology' For Email Search Of Resident Deans' Accounts

Jessica Rinaldi Reuters /Landov

Saying that the action was required because a confidential email that was leaked to the news media "threatened the privacy and due process afforded students," Harvard University administrators on Monday issued a statement explaining why they last year authorized searches of 16 resident deans' email accounts.

Read more
Health Care
12:05 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

African-Americans Suffer From Vaccine Gap

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 1:28 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
Politics
12:03 pm
Mon March 11, 2013

Dr. Ben Carson: Healthcare Is 'Upside Down'

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 2:01 pm

Dr. Ben Carson is known for blazing trails in the neurological field — including breakthrough work separating conjoined twins. Now he's making waves for his political views. Host Michel Martin talks with Carson about the current state of health care in America and his upcoming speech at the Conservative Political Action Conference.

Read more
Health Care
11:57 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Medical Trials Need More Diversity

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 12:48 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
Mental Health
11:57 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Forgiveness Isn't All It's Cracked Up To Be

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 1:28 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this TELL ME MORE from NPR News. This is the season of reflection, for many religious people around the world. The importance of repentance and forgiveness are often a focus this time of year. But faith leaders aren't the only people who talk about the importance of forgiveness.

Recently, on this program, we talked about the work of psychologists who are trying to teach people how to practice forgiveness. They note that there are often physical and emotional benefits to forgiveness.

Read more
Shots - Health News
11:49 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Hardening Of Human Arteries Turns Out To Be A Very Old Story

A 3-D reconstruction of Mummy 38's CT scans shows calcification in her aorta and iliac arteries.
Courtesy of The Lancet

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 1:23 pm

Going "paleo" may not be the answer to heart disease, after all.

A few years ago, a team of researchers challenged our understanding of heart disease as a modern affliction. They found evidence of hardened arteries in the CT scans of ancient Egyptian mummies.

It was a little surprising since our predecessors didn't have fried chicken or cars.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:40 am
Mon March 11, 2013

In Ohio, Town Mourns Death Of Six Teens Killed In Crash

Friends and family of the six teenagers killed in a car crash brought stuffed animals and other memorials to the site Sunday in Warren, Ohio.
Scott R. Galvin AP

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 11:42 am

Warren, Ohio, is in mourning after the deaths of six teenagers who died Sunday when the SUV they were in ran off a highway, flipped over a guardrail and landed in a small pond.

"It's going to be a rough week, a rough rest of the school year," said Michael Notar, Warren school superintendent, as NBC News reports.

Read more
All Tech Considered
7:20 am
Mon March 11, 2013

The Most Talked About Tech And Culture Trends At SXSW Interactive

The feline known as Grumpy Cat.
Elise Hu NPR

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 8:40 pm

Everywhere you walk in downtown Austin, Texas, new names compete for the attention of the tens of thousands wandering the SXSW Interactive festival. Which of this year's emerging ideas and brands — MakerBot, Leap Motion, Geomagic — will break into mainstream consciousness? Here's a quick rundown of the conversation topics in coffee lines, and some notes on appearances and panels that caught our attention:

Beyond The Keyboard And Mouse

Read more
Around the Nation
5:10 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Marvel Announces Comic-Book Freebies

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 7:23 am

At South by Southwest, Marvel announced a comic-book giveaway: On Monday and Tuesday, the publisher is offering free downloads of more than 700 of its "No. 1" issues.

Around the Nation
5:10 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Good News For Gas Guzzlers

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 7:23 am

On Sunday, the Lundberg Survey reported gasoline prices fell more than 5.5 cents a gallon. That may not sound like a whole lot, but it's the first price drop all year.

Around the Nation
5:10 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Bus And Subway Ridership Up Slightly

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 7:23 am

There were some 10.5 billion trips taken across the nation on mass transit last year, the second-highest number since 1957, according to the American Public Transportation Association, which keeps track of how many people ride buses, trains, subways and ferries.

Shots - Health News
4:41 am
Mon March 11, 2013

New Voices For The Voiceless: Synthetic Speech Gets An Upgrade

Samantha Grimaldo was born with a rare disorder, Perisylvian syndrome, and has never been able to speak.
Ellen Webber for NPR

Originally published on Wed March 13, 2013 1:23 pm

Ever since she was a small child, Samantha Grimaldo has had to carry her voice with her.

Grimaldo was born with a rare disorder, Perisylvian syndrome, which means that though she's physically capable in many ways, she's never been able to speak. Instead, she's used a device to speak. She types in what she wants to say, and the device says those words out loud. Her mother, Ruane Grimaldo, says that when Samantha was very young, the voice she used came in a heavy gray box.

Read more
Shots - Health News
4:40 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Depression And Anxiety Could Be Fukushima's Lasting Legacy

A road leading back to the Togawas' old home in the seaside village of Namie is closed due to radioactive contamination.
Geoff Brumfiel NPR

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 7:23 am

Two years ago today, an earthquake and tsunami triggered a meltdown at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Japan. Hundreds of thousands of people living near the plant were forced to flee. The World Health Organization recently predicted a very small rise in cancer risk from radioactive material that was released. For the nuclear refugees, though, anxiety and depression could be the more persistent hazard. Correspondent Geoff Brumfiel traveled to Fukushima prefecture and met victims of the accident to see how they are coping.

Read more
Shots - Health News
4:34 am
Mon March 11, 2013

Aspirin Vs. Melanoma: Study Suggests Headache Pill Prevents Deadly Skin Cancer

A doctor checks for signs of skin cancer at a free cancer screening day in New York City.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 12, 2013 10:22 am

It's not the first study that finds the lowly aspirin may protect against the deadliest kind of skin cancer, but it is one of the largest.

And it adds to a mounting pile of studies suggesting that cheap, common aspirin lowers the risk of many cancers — of the colon, breast, esophagus, stomach, prostate, bladder and ovary.

Read more

Pages